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  • The_Fluff_Pawlor
    replied
    Use #10 blade its the safest

    Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

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  • schnauzerLuv
    replied
    Originally posted by Particentral View Post
    I use those sometimes but NEVER use the foot blade in between pads as the teeth are futher apart and they tend to nick the webbing between the toes easily. I still scissor most of my pads. Flush with the pad, not inside. If I have to go inside I use the Bravura or Mini Arco.
    Agreed. I bought one and hate it. Still have it just to remind me not to use the toe blade. I love the 5-1's for feet now.

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  • Particentral
    replied
    Originally posted by OntheBRINKofDisaster View Post
    SO MUCH safer (and less expensive in the long run) just to get an adjustable trimmer like a Bravura and using that.
    I use those sometimes but NEVER use the foot blade in between pads as the teeth are futher apart and they tend to nick the webbing between the toes easily. I still scissor most of my pads. Flush with the pad, not inside. If I have to go inside I use the Bravura or Mini Arco.

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  • OntheBRINKofDisaster
    replied
    SO MUCH safer (and less expensive in the long run) just to get an adjustable trimmer like a Bravura and using that.

    Leave a comment:


  • ferretlov
    replied
    Originally posted by birdfid View Post
    Does anyone use the #7/8 blade for between the pads? http://www.amazon.com/Oster-CryogenX.../dp/B001CLSYJ0 It's called a toe blade, so it should be pretty good for this job, but I've never tried it. Anyone?
    I have used mine its ok.....its good for tiny feet lol I also Ecuador a lot but I don't use my super sharp gowns lol I always use there http://www.groomerschoice.com/Aaronc...ductinfo/A152/ they are also what I use for bully dogs around faces they just aren't as sharp I've never cut a pad with these but I have with the gowns

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  • Navah
    replied
    I'm always nervous of scissoring pads. My teacher always scissored pads and I never learned how to clipper them until I started my own shop and watched a Jodi Murphy video lol. I don't mind scissoring around the pads, it's in between the pads that scare me. I'll do it if I have to, I've never nicked a dog before but if i can get away with clippering i will.

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  • birdfid
    replied
    Does anyone use the #7/8 blade for between the pads? http://www.amazon.com/Oster-CryogenX.../dp/B001CLSYJ0 It's called a toe blade, so it should be pretty good for this job, but I've never tried it. Anyone?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ryan
    replied
    I usually scissor feet with my little 4" curved. Works like a charm!

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  • schnauzerLuv
    replied
    I clean the pads out with a 15 or 30, then scissor around the pads. I've never cut a pad by keeping one end of the blade flush with the flesh and the beveling slightly to give the foot it's shape, and it doesn't matter which shears I use, mainly straights, usually my tiny retailers. PM me if you want to see what I mean.

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  • JRTease
    replied
    Originally posted by Helly View Post
    I think this is a HUGE mistake, and one that's made all too frequently. Scissoring pads isn't an advanced technique, it's basic, and something every groomer should be taught.

    The reason you made a mistake and cut the pad is quite simple. No one taught you how to do it correctly. Like Parti, I usually scissor pads unless I'm doing poodle feet. And the reasons are varied.

    Some dogs I groom work for a living. Dogs who spend their days on pavement need some protection from the heat. A dog's foot can burn and blister if there's nothing there to protect it. The hair can also serve as a buffer against stone bruises.

    Some dogs, like my Dachshunds, suffer horribly from cold feet in the winter if I shave out their pads. Their feet get so cold they cannot walk, and I have to carry them back inside. So no shaving out pads in the winter.

    Some dogs have a history of interdigital cysts. No shaving on those, either.

    Learning to scissor the feet doesn't take that long. Use curved scissors, with the points curved away from the foot, or use straights, but make sure you keep them flush with the pad, and don't allow them to angle up or down. Take your time at first. It's not hard.

    This is why I love this forum. I constantly get the opportunity to hear from others about different techniques and why they use them. I was taught to do pads with a #30, but I've been dialing it back for a while. It seems so invasive and unnecessary to do this on many breeds simply as a matter of practice. Anymore I take it on a case-by-case basis. I might give the pads a quick scoop, esp if they're prone to matting, but on many large breeds I will knock off the long stuff with a #7 and scissor the rest. I want feet to look neat, but I don't want to screw with the natural protective properties of pad hair or cause irritation.

    Thanks, Helly. I really appreciate your comments on this.

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  • Pam de Mar
    replied
    Pads DO bleed a lot, looks like a crime scene, if it ever happens again, apply the quickstop RIGHT AWAY, before drops start fallin.

    Just be really carefull about where are your blades at, and use a very light motion so if you feel any resistance you'll stop without harming.
    I find my trimmer to be best for pads than scissors. Don't be discouraged, it happens...

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  • oodlesofpoodles01
    replied
    Aww sorry you experienced this. PAds bleed ALOT. I have been grooming 13 years and use my Bravura on a 30 or 40 setting never scissors. BUt I also worked with someone a few years ago who the same thing happened to them as you. Think I was freaked by all the blood and it NOT stopping so I have decided to never use scissors. Im a safety freak though. You live and learn. Chin up and GRoom on!

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  • funkypuppy
    replied
    This might be a local thing but the dogs I see on a daily basis tend to develop painful, rock-hard mats in their paw pads if their pads are not completely shaved out. Ive seen it in almost every dog whose pads were only "neatened" or skimmed flush with the pad.

    I'm surprised to read so many of the more experienced groomers don't completely shave out the pad... don't any of your clients come back with mats in their feet?

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  • sarah83
    replied
    I learned to shave pads with the #40. I have seen groomers nick pads and never wanted it to happen to me. I use the wahl arco clipper that I use for the pads. I've never gotten comfortable with scissoring pads and I would rather just put down the shears, grab the clipper and do it that way instead of regreting it later.

    Good thing is we never stop learning. One more lesson learned!

    =)

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  • Airehead
    replied
    I've only been grooming about a month now, and my teacher always taught the 10 blade/minor scissoring way as well. Do have to say though, I get quite a few ticklish kickers during the scissor part. And that scares the **** out of me sometimes! I like poodlestar's pause...snip technique and have found myself using it now. So far, so good.
    On another note, I was taught to scissor between the pads vertically or at a diminutive angle, with as little pad/cutting edge contact as possible.

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