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  • #16
    If I do shave pads I use a 40. If the dog is in regularly or is a golden, SIB, type I scissor. I also have a few dogs with very flat feet who I just scissor because if you shave out the pads the feet look flatter.
    If you sweat the small stuff, all you have is small soggy stuff.....

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    • #17
      Originally posted by gentlegrooming View Post
      My first teacher said to never scissor pads, but every experienced groomer I've seen does.
      I think this is a HUGE mistake, and one that's made all too frequently. Scissoring pads isn't an advanced technique, it's basic, and something every groomer should be taught.

      The reason you made a mistake and cut the pad is quite simple. No one taught you how to do it correctly. Like Parti, I usually scissor pads unless I'm doing poodle feet. And the reasons are varied.

      Some dogs I groom work for a living. Dogs who spend their days on pavement need some protection from the heat. A dog's foot can burn and blister if there's nothing there to protect it. The hair can also serve as a buffer against stone bruises.

      Some dogs, like my Dachshunds, suffer horribly from cold feet in the winter if I shave out their pads. Their feet get so cold they cannot walk, and I have to carry them back inside. So no shaving out pads in the winter.

      Some dogs have a history of interdigital cysts. No shaving on those, either.

      Learning to scissor the feet doesn't take that long. Use curved scissors, with the points curved away from the foot, or use straights, but make sure you keep them flush with the pad, and don't allow them to angle up or down. Take your time at first. It's not hard.

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      • #18
        Like Parti and Helly...

        I always scissor pads. All of the breeders teaching me over the years also scissored pads. Like Parti, I started with sporting dogs. In all my years I've only nicked one pad and that was on a dog that thinks grooming is a rodeo event. The owner said he was surprised it hadn't happened sooner. I agree wth Helly about the need to learn how to do things correctly from the begining.
        "The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind"-Theodorus Gaza

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        • #19
          Thats SO funny I am completely scared to use the clipper! I learned to scissor pads a long time ago from a groomer friend of mine before I was ever interested in grooming.I use curved scissors they are 6 inches I think,backwards.I guess Its whatever youre used to doing .

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          • #20
            Funny

            I never thought there were different techniques..

            I always scoop out between the big pad and smaller pads with my 30 blade, and scissor the rest of the hairs off the bottom of the feet... I've heard of groomers using the 30 to get all the hair off the bottom of the feet, but I couldn't do that quickly enough. But I never EVER thought that putting a scissor between the big pad and smaller ones was an option.

            As far as scissoring the bottom of the feet, It's a very distict put scissors where you want them, slight pause, then snip... Don't snip in mid movement.. that way if there is a little kick, or tickle it happens as you touch the dog, before the snip. I do this quite quickly, so to the untrained eye, it doesn't look like I'm pausing... but I am.

            And I have nicked a few pads in my day... more in the first year of grooming. But that was before I perfected my place scissor, pause, snip technique. I also had more hysterical customers in my first year... mainly because I didn't know how to handle situations correctly, or what to say, and when to say it... If you get all freaked out, and appologetic, then they usually are harder on you... if you stay professional... have all the facts laid out on what happened, why it happened, what you did about it, what you are going to offer the client (a discount, free vet visit, free groom, etc...) and what the client needs to do to treat it after the dog leaves, then they are usually much better about the whole thing.

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            • #21
              Scissor when necessary

              I was taught to shave the pads on compliant dogs with a 10 blade (never taught/allowed to use a 30 or 40 blade) and to scissor on those who don't take kindly to the clipper. I have yet to have dogs irritated by the clipper, but I never DIG in with it - party due to the hair's protective qualities for the foot. Luckily (for this) my scissors are on the duller side so I haven't made any cuts. Knock on wood!

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              • #22
                As a student I'm still using a 10 blade and some scissoring

                So, some days it goes well, and other days not so well. One technique my instructor taught me was to hold the scissors on the pad, horizontal to the foot, so not directly from toe to heel.. but from side of foot to side of foot. And if the dog's food is sensitive or moving.. just hold the scissors on the foot, and that usually stops them from moving.

                However.. having said that.. I just got new scissors and they are SHARP! I've already nicked myself several times just with the tip and just did the same to a poor dog's pad. I wasn't paying attention so I take full blame. I so wish I could use a shorter blade, but that will come later.

                Debbie
                Debbie
                There's always room for another rose in the garden.

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                • #23
                  I've only been grooming about a month now, and my teacher always taught the 10 blade/minor scissoring way as well. Do have to say though, I get quite a few ticklish kickers during the scissor part. And that scares the **** out of me sometimes! I like poodlestar's pause...snip technique and have found myself using it now. So far, so good.
                  On another note, I was taught to scissor between the pads vertically or at a diminutive angle, with as little pad/cutting edge contact as possible.

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                  • #24
                    I learned to shave pads with the #40. I have seen groomers nick pads and never wanted it to happen to me. I use the wahl arco clipper that I use for the pads. I've never gotten comfortable with scissoring pads and I would rather just put down the shears, grab the clipper and do it that way instead of regreting it later.

                    Good thing is we never stop learning. One more lesson learned!

                    =)

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                    • #25
                      This might be a local thing but the dogs I see on a daily basis tend to develop painful, rock-hard mats in their paw pads if their pads are not completely shaved out. Ive seen it in almost every dog whose pads were only "neatened" or skimmed flush with the pad.

                      I'm surprised to read so many of the more experienced groomers don't completely shave out the pad... don't any of your clients come back with mats in their feet?

                      Sent from my HTC Glacier using Tapatalk
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                      • #26
                        Aww sorry you experienced this. PAds bleed ALOT. I have been grooming 13 years and use my Bravura on a 30 or 40 setting never scissors. BUt I also worked with someone a few years ago who the same thing happened to them as you. Think I was freaked by all the blood and it NOT stopping so I have decided to never use scissors. Im a safety freak though. You live and learn. Chin up and GRoom on!

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                        • #27
                          Pads DO bleed a lot, looks like a crime scene, if it ever happens again, apply the quickstop RIGHT AWAY, before drops start fallin.

                          Just be really carefull about where are your blades at, and use a very light motion so if you feel any resistance you'll stop without harming.
                          I find my trimmer to be best for pads than scissors. Don't be discouraged, it happens...

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Helly View Post
                            I think this is a HUGE mistake, and one that's made all too frequently. Scissoring pads isn't an advanced technique, it's basic, and something every groomer should be taught.

                            The reason you made a mistake and cut the pad is quite simple. No one taught you how to do it correctly. Like Parti, I usually scissor pads unless I'm doing poodle feet. And the reasons are varied.

                            Some dogs I groom work for a living. Dogs who spend their days on pavement need some protection from the heat. A dog's foot can burn and blister if there's nothing there to protect it. The hair can also serve as a buffer against stone bruises.

                            Some dogs, like my Dachshunds, suffer horribly from cold feet in the winter if I shave out their pads. Their feet get so cold they cannot walk, and I have to carry them back inside. So no shaving out pads in the winter.

                            Some dogs have a history of interdigital cysts. No shaving on those, either.

                            Learning to scissor the feet doesn't take that long. Use curved scissors, with the points curved away from the foot, or use straights, but make sure you keep them flush with the pad, and don't allow them to angle up or down. Take your time at first. It's not hard.

                            This is why I love this forum. I constantly get the opportunity to hear from others about different techniques and why they use them. I was taught to do pads with a #30, but I've been dialing it back for a while. It seems so invasive and unnecessary to do this on many breeds simply as a matter of practice. Anymore I take it on a case-by-case basis. I might give the pads a quick scoop, esp if they're prone to matting, but on many large breeds I will knock off the long stuff with a #7 and scissor the rest. I want feet to look neat, but I don't want to screw with the natural protective properties of pad hair or cause irritation.

                            Thanks, Helly. I really appreciate your comments on this.

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                            • #29
                              I clean the pads out with a 15 or 30, then scissor around the pads. I've never cut a pad by keeping one end of the blade flush with the flesh and the beveling slightly to give the foot it's shape, and it doesn't matter which shears I use, mainly straights, usually my tiny retailers. PM me if you want to see what I mean.
                              -----------------------------------------------
                              damnit, I want a white poodle!

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                              • #30
                                I usually scissor feet with my little 4" curved. Works like a charm!

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