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  • Going backwards?

    Just asking! How many of you groomers have tried the backwards thing? You know, going against the grain on certain dogs. Well my experience with it is wonderful. I know you're probably saying..." She's late" " We've been doing that". Well that's why i wanna know. I'm still new to grooming and i had been having a hard time figuring out how to stop those ugly clipper lines, you know when shaving down a lab with say a #10 or something. I can still do it quite neatly, but it's so smooth going against the grain with a #5 or #7, no lines. I think this is the most wonderful thing a person can learwhen new to grooming. Plus it shaves of valuable time spent trying to smooth out a coarse coat. I use a #4 backwards in the place of #7 w/grain, a #5 A/grain in the place of #10 W/grain, a #7 in the place of #15 W/grain. But when the client comes in with a heavily coated breed like Australian sheperd but they don't want it shaved down and still want it a little fluffy, i go backwards with a #0,1/2,or 1 comb. It comes out so pretty. And i scissor the sticky outties. Now, 'I've told you about my experience, now tell me about some of your secrets that i could use to be a little more productive. Thanks for the info!!!

  • #2
    In my experience reverse shaving is a good thing especally for those Lab shaves and husband heads.
    1.5 comb reverse= 5F
    4F reverse = 7F
    5F reverse = 8.5
    7F reverse = little shorter than a 10--this what I use to do my husbands head.
    Never gonna know if you never even try

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    • #3
      I just wanted to comment. Don't feel bad that about telling people about your experience. I was in a grooming seminar last year, being taught by someone very, very knowledgable andvery accomplished. She was working on a dog and said that someone had told her about the reverse shaving, that she was afraid to try it, finally did and was suprised how well it worked. I was so surprised that someone of that calliber wasn't really familiar with it. Just goes to show you that you can always learn something new, no matter how long you've been grooming. That's the great thing about getting together with other groomers to share your "secrets".
      don't find yourself up a creek without a poodle.

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      • #4
        straight coats

        Where I found reversing to be the best result was on puppy clips on yorkies. I think someone mentioned a 1.5 as a 5f, when you need to do the legs that have chicken feather hair and very straight stingy coats, it sure worked wonders for me. The first time I reversed anything was about 20 years into this adventure, it was never a mentioned practice for the 'old school" groomers other than on ft, fa, ta, or sani clipping. Now I do it all the time!
        Seems like it's all fair game today....whoohooo
        Good luck!

        Jackie

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        • #5
          I tried it a few times and I still am not sure whether I like it. It doesn't work on wire haired coats at least for me. And when I do it my shoulder hurts so bad I could puke. Maybe it was all of those years being a fast-pitch pitcher, idk!

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          • #6
            I've been backwards for awhile

            & recently learned something else.

            I was doing a 7 reverse on a Chow mix & I usally push the clipper / clipper vac up & away from me starting on the left rear hip area. I did this several times. When I moved to stand near the front of the dog, for whatever reason I placed the clipper almost at the point of her hip & pulled the clipper towards, me going towards her middle spine. I guess like everyone does when going with the lay of the coat. See, I rarely go with the lay.
            WOW!! I could do it this way much faster!

            It doesn't work for all dogs but for those who do the big dog shave downs - this could make a difference. Remember to make sure the table is at the right height so to not strain your back.

            But maybe everyone already knew this.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by alinton81 View Post
              I tried it a few times and I still am not sure whether I like it. It doesn't work on wire haired coats at least for me. And when I do it my shoulder hurts so bad I could puke. Maybe it was all of those years being a fast-pitch pitcher, idk!
              Why do your shoulders hurt? When I clip in reverse it's no different then clipping with the grain in terms of body posture. If anything it's easier on me because I don't have to take as many passes to get it even.

              Now, I'm not slamming you are anything (I know over the internet it's hard to understand someones intentions) but I actually like it better on hard coats. It's those soft coats that I don't use it on. They seem to "jam" the blade more.

              I don't reverse clip every day or anything like that. But whenever I am doomed to shave down a short bred (pug, lab, etc) I reverse shave 90% of the time. It picks up the hair and cuts it right off. I can't imagine trying to back brush a lab.
              "The most affectionate creature in the world is a wet dog." -Ambrose Bierce

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              • #8
                The first time I tried reverse clipping was on Cockers. I read about it in a magazine, and decided to give it a try. After a little experimenting to get blending the skirt right, I always do a reverse on Cockers. It leaves such a plush look and feel, and no clipper lines.

                I also do reverse clipping on double coats, Labs, the occasional Pug. I love it. I do lots of double coats with a snap on comb, against the growth, and they come out plush and smooth.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by foxhound lady View Post
                  In my experience reverse shaving is a good thing especally for those Lab shaves and husband heads.
                  1.5 comb reverse= 5F
                  4F reverse = 7F
                  5F reverse = 8.5
                  7F reverse = little shorter than a 10--this what I use to do my husbands head.
                  It's early morning here, and I know my cognitive skills have yet to catch up with the sunrise...but, when I saw husbands head...I'm thinkin' "Wow this must be some new cutting edge clip!" It's been awhile since I've had a husband so...they're kinda off my radar! LOL!!!
                  I'm ok now...
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  Annette, who's very graciously allowed to live with the dogs.

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                  • #10
                    20 years ago when I was trained in OTJ, that is how I was taught, and that is how I did ALL schn's and all cockers and springers getting breed clips. A few years after that I went to work for a different place, and was chastised heavily for doing that, so changed my ways. Took a fair ammount of time to get lines blended going "with" the hair, but I am comfortable now doing it either way. I always shave my pugs with a 7A, and love the smooth finnish it leaves.
                    Kelley

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                    • #11
                      An example

                      I groom a little Lhasa mix. Softest coat in town. After I'm done I would need the blenders to tidy up the lines. That was even so with a snap on in reverse. But for summer I put her a little shorter and did a reverse #4F. Just perfect, velvety and no work after a one time thru.

                      I do a Pug with a #5 F reverse. She looks like a natural short coated dog.

                      It does help a lot to have a vac system especially for the snap on reverse trims. I have the TaxiVac. I use a fairly high suction in that case and it just lifts the hair into the blade and clips it off so even.
                      Money will buy you a pretty good dog but it won't buy the wag of it's tail.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by keyray View Post
                        Why do your shoulders hurt? When I clip in reverse it's no different then clipping with the grain in terms of body posture. If anything it's easier on me because I don't have to take as many passes to get it even.

                        Now, I'm not slamming you are anything (I know over the internet it's hard to understand someones intentions) but I actually like it better on hard coats. It's those soft coats that I don't use it on. They seem to "jam" the blade more.

                        I don't reverse clip every day or anything like that. But whenever I am doomed to shave down a short bred (pug, lab, etc) I reverse shave 90% of the time. It picks up the hair and cuts it right off. I can't imagine trying to back brush a lab.
                        I don't know why my shoulders hurt! Maybe I am too short for the grooming table and I have to reach up--lol.... I did a shepherd mix today and I didn't hurt afterwards and she did look really good. I guess it is something I have to get use to.

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                        • #13
                          I do not groom backwards. I've never needed to as grooming with the grain correctly, you won't need to go in reverse. Also, I've been told that ISCC is not smiling at the practice of it either. I'll go with the grain and it's still smooth for me.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hairdevil View Post
                            I do not groom backwards. I've never needed to as grooming with the grain correctly, you won't need to go in reverse. Also, I've been told that ISCC is not smiling at the practice of it either. I'll go with the grain and it's still smooth for me.
                            I guess Marlene Romani doesn't know how to groom with the growth correctly, then, right along with the rest of us.

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                            • #15
                              What does ISCC say about reverse clipping?

                              I've been told that ISCC is not smiling at the practice of it either. [/QUOTE]

                              And who, at ISCC, is saying this?

                              I am not as familiar with certification as many here are.
                              If I remember right in order to be NCMG you have to test without any type of vac system. Just their rules.
                              They don't dislike the vac systems as a whole organization, I'm sure.
                              We all know what a wealth of knowlwdge Helly is, & she doesn't use a vac system, but does she condemn them? No.

                              Certainly not easier for me to certifiy without a CV but if I want to become certified I gotta do what they say while testing- not when I'm back home.

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