Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Handling dogs in the tub...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Handling dogs in the tub...

    Just a very friendly reminder-- for those of us who allow dogs to stand on the edge of the tub while we are drying them. It is easy to forget how the center of gravity shifts for a dog when they do not have all four feet planted on the ground. Couple this being slightly off balance with the fact that most of our small dogs are longer in the spine or more rectangularly built (and often OVERWEIGHT as well), means that the dog's spine is not at its most solid and strong position when they are on their back legs. So, when toweling a dog, be careful not to push down on the dog's back or shoulders while squeezing out wetness from the coat. It is always best that the dog be on all fours, and minimal pressure used along the spine when you are drying to lessen the possibility of compressing a disc or moving anything too far from its normal stretching range.
    This is a cute photo of Modi in my tub today during his bath--standing on the edge of the tub....which reminded me to write this post!
    Attached Files
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  • #2
    No replies?!!! Uh-oh,,am I guilty of a "ohm yeah,,no duh", post?! LOL! ~Not the first time!
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Modi is so cute! Thanks for the heads up, too!
      Debi
      http://www.uppypuppydogsalon.com
      My life is lived in the company of dogs

      Comment


      • #4
        I just read this today (new here posting, been reading for a few months) and I actually wasn't aware of this. Thanks! It may be a no brainer, but maybe I just had to have someone spell it out for me. Will keep in mind from now on
        amanda
        ~You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who cannot pay you back~

        Comment


        • #5
          Good point!
          Certified Master Pet Tech Pet CPR, First Aid and Care Instructor
          "Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation." Henry Ward Beecher US Congregational Minister 1813-1887

          Comment


          • #6
            don't worry...

            as long as people are reading it, you are getting the message across... Never really thought too much about it. I'm always careful if I suspect a back problem or am told about one, but it typically never crosses my mind during a busy day.

            I wish more people would throw out random tips on this board... you never know who you could be helping.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the post! I'll remember this from now on.

              Comment


              • #8
                Why we don't post

                many of us are too embarrassed to admit we didn't know this. Look at # of hits (views), not replies!

                Comment


                • #9
                  P.S.

                  Thanks for bumping this up, btw.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    OK, Chris - I gotta question for ya! On small dogs with luxating patellas, should I avoid flexing and extending the knee joint all the way? I usually do the back nails "horsey style" and the leg is slightly down and behind, with the paw curled under so I can see the toenails. I also fold the leg and tuck it up under the dog (like when boy dog's lift their legs to potty), holding the tail so I an reach the sanitary and groin areas. Is this okay? Are there any specific safety precautions I should be taken regarding handling these little knee-poppers?
                    Guard well within yourself that treasure, kindness. Know how to give without hesitation, how to lose without regret, how to acquire without meanness.
                    George Sand (1804 - 1876)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Holding the foot up like a male leg lifter pops in my toy poodles knee back in all the time.. Someitmes I dont realize when it pops out until then. Her speciically doesnt have any issues with normal leg manipulations pain wise. She pops her knee out on he own when you pick her up (she tenses a bit), but never yelps in pain or noticibly hobbles.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X