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Pattern on horse rump

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  • Pattern on horse rump

    Can anyone tell me the name of the checkerboard pattern on english shown horses? Is it still done or is it a dated thing?

  • #2
    I've been to a lot of horseshows in my locale, but I have never noticed a checkerboard pattern on any of them (English or Western) although I have seen them utilized on trail horses in a casual manner showing through a winter coat. What I have seen in competition are complete body shaves, trace or a forward patterned design. As to a specific name for that type of clip is an unknown for me other than "checkerboard." Perhaps the internet might be helpful in answering your question.

    Sincerely,
    Donna

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    • #3
      Quarter marks are still done! Here's some pretty ones!
      http://www.horsechannel.com/horse-ex...allery-01.aspx
      Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
      www.ChrisSertzel.com

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      • #4
        They arent done in the breed rings but some people put them on their showjumpers, dressage or event horses just to make them extra pretty. You can buy a plastic stencil in a few different patterns and you just brush the hair against the grain and then set it with hairspray. I've never seen it clipped in over here.

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        • #5
          I finally found a picture of what i was looking for.
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Originally posted by windywaycavaliers View Post
            Quarter marks are still done! Here's some pretty ones!
            http://www.horsechannel.com/horse-ex...allery-01.aspx
            Very Cool!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by petgroomaustralia View Post
              They arent done in the breed rings but some people put them on their showjumpers, dressage or event horses just to make them extra pretty. You can buy a plastic stencil in a few different patterns and you just brush the hair against the grain and then set it with hairspray. I've never seen it clipped in over here.
              I wondered how it was done. Thanks.
              "We are all ignorant--we merely have different areas of specialization."~Anonymous
              People, PLEASE..It's ONLY a website!~Me

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              • #8
                It real easy. Mist coat. using a small mane comb, comb in one direction ( making a square which your comb is perfect length), then the next the other way. Spray with hair spray. You can do many design too. Hearts, circles. We did this to the races horse's. Have fun..

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                • #9
                  The most amazing quartermark I think I ever saw was a simple checkerboard pattern placed on the rump of the TB stallion, Ribot.

                  Anyone familiar with TBs knows Ribot was absolutely nuts. I was told he used to spend his time in his stall up on his hind legs chewing a deep channel completely around the stall walls, just below ceiling level - when he wasn't trying to kill people.

                  I have to give credit to his groom, with a horse of that disposition I don't know if I'd want to be standing around brushing pretty patterns on his hinder.

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                  • #10
                    =0)

                    I believe quarter marks are done mostly on dressage or jumping horses. You can buy special templates from certain stores.. I think schneiders has them? But if you want to go crazy you can buy the colored or glitter gel for horses and buy art templates from a craft store. Put the template on the rump, apply the gel, brush backwards, and let dry =0) Its great fun for parades, fun shows, and gaming. If you are doing traditional english, dressage, or event showing though, i'd skip the gel and just go with the brushing. It shows you really put effort into finishing your horse's grooming and as a judge for small shows around my area I really appreciate it =0) Good Luck!

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                    • #11
                      OMG. this is so cool

                      I have a friend with miniature horses, I help her bathe them every year and walk them in the 4th of july parade. I am so going to try this next year. no clipping? just damp, comb, hair spray? sounds easy enough. any suggestions on coloring horses?

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                      • #12
                        This would be cool to do on a short haired dog. I think I'd use the clippers though, don't know that you could get the hair to go reverse on some breeds. But maybe on a softer coat do a #7, leaving enough length to do the pattern?. You'd need a breed with enough "butt real estate"! I've yet to get a client to let me do it.

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                        • #13
                          We made our own stensil of a horse rearing, use bristle brush to smooth coat, lay stensil down, brush against grain. Spray with hair spray and your done! Stensil was made out of thin sheet metal.

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                          • #14
                            Hi all!

                            We used to do it for everything pony club! Gymkhanas, dressage days, eventing, show jumping, troop drill ... all along with hoof painting, tail and mane braiding, ribbon braided brow bands and matching eventing gear; saddle cloths; rugs/blankets and bridle bags ... horsey horse-horse everything horse ... if you are not a horse person and there are two horse people in the room ... you may as well go out and get coffee!

                            You probably could do the rump patterns on a short coated dog, you are not so much brushing the hair back against itself, more on an angle opposing hair on another direction. It's so easy.

                            http://www.stirrups.co.nz/product.ph...uctid=583&js=n

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ali Kat View Post
                              This would be cool to do on a short haired dog. I think I'd use the clippers though, don't know that you could get the hair to go reverse on some breeds. But maybe on a softer coat do a #7, leaving enough length to do the pattern?. You'd need a breed with enough "butt real estate"! I've yet to get a client to let me do it.
                              Here's a pattern I clipped on my dog's rump. I don't think you could brush in the pattern on a Poodle, though. Next time I get a large dog with the right hair I'm going to give it a shot.
                              Attached Files

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