Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Encompassing pet care and grooming

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Encompassing pet care and grooming

    Just s short article that I wrote and wanted to revive.
    More and more of today's grooming professionals are realizing that as groomers and pet stylists, we have an important role to fill as part of the extended family of pet caregivers.
    More groomers are taking aim at putting themselves in the position to nurture professional relationships with their clients by offering care that always needed that attention, but was often left out because of the hectic or busy environment of the grooming salon. Part of this progressive change is taking shape because more and more groomers are realizing that working smarter is not working harder. The physicality of grooming needs to be offset in some way to provide longevity for pet stylists and their careers. These new opportunities are surfacing in many ways as part of the upward industry trend towards more spa type salons and services, more slow paced and well planned grooming salon procedures, client educational classes, nutrition counceling, the use of more natural products and an opening of the door to professional courtesy and interaction with veterinarians.
    I have always felt that there is a lot of good that can be done for our clients by offering them as natural and inclusive care as we can during their visits and by remembering that we are part of a larger picture- a very important part. Educating pet owners as much as possible during their visits for grooming about issues we see with their pet has never had anything to do with trends or making profit, but what it does have at its core is compassion and a sense of the bigger picture. Gaining knowledge to help treat the minor issues that arise only ensures patronage from clients and your business future. What is does stimulate is a better professional relationship with your clients, more consideration of your ability and professional care, and gained confidence of self when we know that we've educated ourselves, and because we care about the animals we treat, we are better able to help care for them.
    Be it personality or training concerns, nutrition and how it benefits and affects health and longevity, skin and coat, signals or symptoms that we find during grooming that may have a medical issue behind them, all of these things that we encounter any given day while at work, are opportunities for us to go above and beyond and support the life quality of our pet clients and their families.
    This comprehensive care benefits us as we realize that we can also do such good for ourselves by challenging our current knowledge and considering the fact that we have a chance every day to make a difference and start positive change. Learning more ourselves starts a chain reaction of learning, sharing and possible change. And even if the care we give goes no further than to the immediate pet that we care for, there still is no real loss there, as we are the only ones deciding whether or not to give that care.
    I say give the extra time, give the extra knowledge, and by all means give that part of yourself that wants to consider those things outside of the average or the norm. The rewards are immense, and the return comes in ways that are meaningful- not so much as just profit, but also in pride and personal growth progression.
    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
    www.ChrisSertzel.com

  • #2
    it does feel good when you bring something to the owners attention, and it is caught BEFORE it becomes a death issue. no better client relation than when they realizewe do care about their pet enough to pay attention and remember each little detail.
    ~~Everyone is entitled to my opinion!~~

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm all for improving client relationships. I'm all for reporting abnormal findings during a groom. However, I think groomers should stay out of the nutritional counseling. We don't have the necessary training, and even if we did, we don't have the equipment necessary to assess a pets nutritional needs.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well Helly, I have to disagree. We are fully capable to work with independent nutrition councellors (not food sales reps), and Vets to gain knowledge,,and we do not have to "treat" nutritional deficiencies- only to look at the dog in question, see its symptoms, and talk with the owner about foods and supplements, and if needed, refer them to a Vet or nutritionist. But then, there's PLENTY of Vets out there not knowledgeable in nutrition, or those that get income off of prescribing food within a line that they sell in their clinics. No matter where a client goes,,,whether to a Vet, a groomer, a nutritionist, a trainer or the like, they have to rely that we are being truthful and that we are knowledgeable. That isn't really the point of the entire article,,but oh well...
        ...If that's all that you could pull from my article to disagree with this time, I feel fortunate, I guess.
        Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
        www.ChrisSertzel.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Well said Chris, very nice article, as always!
          What does a dog do on it's day off?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by windywaycavaliers View Post
            Well Helly, I have to disagree. We are fully capable to work with independent nutrition councellors (not food sales reps), and Vets to gain knowledge,,and we do not have to "treat" nutritional deficiencies- only to look at the dog in question, see its symptoms, and talk with the owner about foods and supplements, and if needed, refer them to a Vet or nutritionist. But then, there's PLENTY of Vets out there not knowledgeable in nutrition, or those that get income off of prescribing food within a line that they sell in their clinics. No matter where a client goes,,,whether to a Vet, a groomer, a nutritionist, a trainer or the like, they have to rely that we are being truthful and that we are knowledgeable. That isn't really the point of the entire article,,but oh well...
            ...If that's all that you could pull from my article to disagree with this time, I feel fortunate, I guess.

            But how can you presume to councel a client on nutrition when you do not know what's wrong? Some dogs need low fiber, some need high. Some need low protien, some need high. Some dogs will become very sick if fed a raw diet. And if you don't have the equipment to test for digestive problems all the nutritional advice is going for naught.

            I've seen, and I know you have too, many many groomers on this board making suggestions to other members about changing a dogs diet. But sometimes the problem is NOT the diet. Sometimes it's something like exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, gall bladder disease, liver disease, or Cushing's disease.

            There are too many times where some groomers are crossing the line into territory they shouldn't. And one of these days it's going to bite ALL of us in the butt. You don't go to your own hair stylist for advice on a diet or to get your teeth cleaned. That's not something a hair stylist would do. And groomers shouldn't do it, either.

            And I gotta say, while I do disagree with things you say, I've never made any comment like the last one you just posted. I have a right to disagree, and say so. But I don't have a right to be rude and insult you.

            Play the ball, not the ball player.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for continuing to provide all of us with such good information Chris Keep up the good work!

              Comment


              • #8
                Helly, I never insulted you in my response above. I re-read it and what you put into quotes several times. Never insulted you. Sorry.
                Let's move on please.
                Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                www.ChrisSertzel.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by windywaycavaliers View Post
                  Helly, I never insulted you in my response above. I re-read it and what you put into quotes several times. Never insulted you. Sorry.
                  Let's move on please.
                  Who are you to presume to know if I was insulted or not? So yes, you did insult me. It was rude and uncalled for.

                  Play the ball, not the ball player.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Helly View Post
                    Who are you to presume to know if I was insulted or not? So yes, you did insult me. It was rude and uncalled for.

                    Play the ball, not the ball player.
                    Well, I am playing the ball. The BALL is that I wrote an article on encompassing grooming, which some others enjoyed, and you of course did not. Which I seem to get from you a on nearly everything that I post which has thought and time into it. As well as that you also play the victim card when I disagree with you--go back and check our posts,,as soon as I make a point that can't be argued, you claim that I insulted you,, you've done it a couple of times. And it seems a tactic to get off topic. SO let's STAY on TOPIC. Don't say I insulted you,,perhaps I "improperly worded my response in its submissive effect",,,but I would be concerned with out and out blaming an "insult" to the point of saying I am rude, on anyone via text. Right? I mean how many times have you been blamed of insulting and bullying and picking apart others on this forum? And what was your rebuttal? "I am just giving my opinion, which I am entitled to..." Well, so am I, so you should be able to understand where I am coming from.

                    What's good for the goose...
                    Now, let's move on, please.
                    Last edited by windywaycavaliers; 01-02-10, 11:07 PM.
                    Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                    www.ChrisSertzel.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I dont want to disagree with either of you but isn't nutrition advice the same thing that pet stores do? I mean I worked at a pet store and gave advice on pet foods all the time. Its not saying you should give advice on animals with health problems that is a whole different ball game. I think the first line of defense in any conversation with a pet owner is to say has your dog seen a vet? If the dog has had the proper vet work done and is still having food issues I think we should be knowledgeable enough to suggest some different types of foods. There is a difference between nutrition counseling and simple dog food choices. Always give choices and recommend that they talk with vets or nutritionist if they want more help.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I totally agree, tmenne.
                        And, OT but that has to be the most vibrant and pretty pink Poodle I have seen in awhile. I love it when the colors that are done all over the dog are so rich and deep! So pretty.
                        Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                        www.ChrisSertzel.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well Helly, you are not the only one who works in the vet clinics and has the knowledge that you do, plenty of us here do. Having that knowledge and the benefit of a law degree I can tell you that asking clients about their pets' diet and suggesting alternatives DOES NOT cross any line that should not be crossed. It is more often diet that IS the issue than it is a medical problem and giving the diet option a try first is not likely to harm the pet especially considering that many many times the client will tell you that they are feeding very low quality food(s). A dog with a medical problem is also likely to be exhibiting other symptoms than just a skin problem. I also think that Windy and everyone else here is smart enough to also advise the clients to seek a vet consult. I dont agree with your statement about raw feeding, I read the thread where you said your dog got sick, but pancreatitis isnt caused by raw vs cooked vs commercial foods, its caused by a high fat diet and although you did mention this later, you inferred that it was the raw meat itself that was the issue. It read to me as if you were just trying a scare tactic to push your negative opinion of raw feeding. I myself have seen great improvements with raw feeding and I have pulled my vets from the dark ages kicking and screaming and forced them to actually look at it and they now are also acknowledging the benefits.
                          You ARE coming across as being argumentative for no good reason against Windy. You dont have to agree with her or like what she is doing but attacking her and others' posts is becoming a habit that many of us are noticing.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thank you Chris for that article. I too feel that nutrition is an issue with a lot of the pets we see and care for. I agree that a lot of vets haven't quite gotten that, they sell the food they carry which isn't all that great anyway. I have a client whose dog a toy poo has had every test known and was still an itchy mess. She was feeding 'vet food' and I suggested she feed a more organic food and low and behold! Dog doesn't itch anymore. I feel that a lot of times we are the pets 'first line of defense' we see things and catch things the owners and apparently sometimes VETS don't catch
                            The ocean is a desert with it's life underground and the perfect disguise above><((((؛>`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸.·´¯`·...¸><((((؛>¸.
                            ·´¯`·.¸. , . .·´¯`·.. ><((((؛>`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸.·´¯`·...¸><((((؛>

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by petgroomaustralia View Post
                              You ARE coming across as being argumentative for no good reason against Windy. You dont have to agree with her or like what she is doing but attacking her and others' posts is becoming a habit that many of us are noticing.
                              I agree.

                              Keep up the good work Chris, it is appreciated

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X