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Handstripping anf skin issues...

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  • Handstripping anf skin issues...

    Hey there, I was recently contacted by someone wanting to get their terrier stripped because her vet said it may help to alleviate her skin problems-I have not yet spoken to her (She left me a message) so I don't know yet what type of skin problems but wondered if this were true. Thanks

  • #2
    I'll bet she meant "stripped" like, with #10 blade.

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    • #3
      Alison, are you sure the vet didn't mean 'carding'-getting rid of all the dead undercoat? That could help the skin because a badly pelted coat doesn't let the air get to it. He also could have meant 'stripped' as in shave it all off because it's so badly matted the skin can't breathe. I really doubt he meant hand-stripped as in show dogs. Not a lot of groomers offer this service, and you certainly wouldn't want to pull hair on a dog with skin issues.
      Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

      Groom on!!!

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      • #4
        Actually, yes, he might have meant stripped, as in hand stripped. Especially if the dog is a schnauzer. Stripping opens the folicles, and if the dog has sebaceous plugs (like blackheads) it helps to clear them out. Also, if the dog has been being clipped, the hairs can grow around themselves under the skin, rather than grow normally. Stripping will aleviate that problem, too.

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        • #5
          Yeah

          I lost a good customer, with their newer Wire Fox Terrier because a Vet said stripping (not shaving) would help not cause skin problems. I can't help but think that opening up the follicles could cause problems. What is the difference between shaving a terrier and shaving say a Lab? Quoting Helly: "Also, if the dog has been being clipped, the hairs can grow around themselves under the skin, rather than grow normally. Stripping will aleviate that problem, too." If the Vet thinks it's good to strip rather than shave why is it okay to shave a Lab (and I think it is okay to shave a lab). I also know Helly thinks it's okay to shave a Lab.

          I'm not willing to do it, but am asking around at dog shows about it. I found someone who agreed that many that strip the terriers are not kind but that one can do it so it doesn't hurt, though it should be done weekly. She pointed out a big time Terrier Handler who lives near me saying she and her staff do it kindly, and I'm thinking of at least visiting and seeing if I can get a lesson, even if just for my knowledge base.
          Money will buy you a pretty good dog but it won't buy the wag of it's tail.

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          • #6
            I have a cairn terrier that comes in that has always had skin issues all her life. I started stripping her more and more when she came in and she seems to be getting a lot better. Her hair is thicker now than it ever has been and and she is really starting to look like a cairn. I have been doing her for about 2 years, and she has always been very light coated and has skin issues. Medicated baths have helped, but not enough, till I started stripping her.

            It really doesn't seem to bother the terriers to be stripped. My daughter strips a fox terrier, and he is better stripping than using the clippers on him. I strip my young westy and it doesn't bother her at all.

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            • #7
              Thanks guys, I actually have quite a few handstrips that I do, and I *thought* I had remembered hearing that stripping could help with skin issues on some dogs, but had never encountered it before. Just wanted to be sure. Thanks again!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Arrooh View Post
                I lost a good customer, with their newer Wire Fox Terrier because a Vet said stripping (not shaving) would help not cause skin problems. I can't help but think that opening up the follicles could cause problems. What is the difference between shaving a terrier and shaving say a Lab? Quoting Helly: "Also, if the dog has been being clipped, the hairs can grow around themselves under the skin, rather than grow normally. Stripping will aleviate that problem, too." If the Vet thinks it's good to strip rather than shave why is it okay to shave a Lab (and I think it is okay to shave a lab). I also know Helly thinks it's okay to shave a Lab.
                Look at a Lab's hair. Then look at a terrier's hair. Terrier hair has a kink to it. It'll curl under the skin more easily than a Lab hair. I'd also venture to guess that the clipping doesn't cause a hair to become ingrown so much as stripping the old hair will help prevent the new one from curling around, under the skin.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Arrooh View Post
                  I'm not willing to do it, but am asking around at dog shows about it. I found someone who agreed that many that strip the terriers are not kind but that one can do it so it doesn't hurt, though it should be done weekly. She pointed out a big time Terrier Handler who lives near me saying she and her staff do it kindly, and I'm thinking of at least visiting and seeing if I can get a lesson, even if just for my knowledge base.
                  They teach us to do this at school. If you get them on a schedule for stipping every six weeks you will have three layers of hair and only strip the top layer each time. You don't want to do it every week or it will mess up the layers. It doesn't hurt them; the hair that is stipped is ready to come out, just doesn't shed as easily as other types that don't get hand stripped. Usually the dogs don't care but some of them really seem to like it, as if it feels good to them, which I'd imagine it does, getting rid of all that itchiness!

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                  • #10
                    i worked with a woman who insisted on stripping out the backs of all of the cockers she groomed--she claimed it prevented skin problems, i was a believer since none of them had skin problems and she told me that many of them came to her in pretty bad shape. also as far as the labs go, ever have one come back looking patchy or mangy after shaving them down? i've gotten them to look normal again after carding them for a year or so. i will still shave a lab or any other dog for that matter, but i warn my customers that sometimes, not all the time, it can ruin a dogs coat.
                    meggan

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                    • #11
                      Favorite part about the board

                      is reading all the different ideas and opinions. (wish no one would put another down for their ideas, though)

                      So I asked this highly esteemed Terrier Pro Handler and breeder about the idea of hand stripping being better for their skin. Her answer: HOGWASH. She said they have good skin or they don't, mostly due to their breeding. She said she would not want to put pets through the ordeal of stripping, and clips her retired champions, or at least cards, not the putting them through the ordeal of proper stripping. I asked if I could quote her, and she said sure, but I'm still hesitant to name her lest someone picks on her. Meanwhile that Wire Fox Terrier client gets it's back stripped over there because the Vet said so, and I bath and tidy a bit once a month in the middle of the monthly four hour sessions with the handler's kennel groomers.
                      Money will buy you a pretty good dog but it won't buy the wag of it's tail.

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                      • #12
                        I'd be interested in knowing who said that, because yes, breeding does have a lot to do with it too, but anyone with an understanding in skin and coat would know that H. S. is better for the skin.

                        I have a hard time understanding why someone that's a professional and a breeder would say that.

                        And... some people may not know WHY they do things... just that they are supposed to do it.
                        Last edited by Mr.Terrier; 01-31-08, 01:28 PM. Reason: no spell check! LOL

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                        • #13
                          Its not just better for the skin, its better for the hair. Yuo get darker, coarser, more CORRECT caots when carding or stripping is done regularly. I raised cockers for years and all of them had great skin. NO PROBLEMS at all. I card them all, even when I shave them down. I disagree though that you cant do it weekly. Most show dogs are worked weekly or every two weeks with no adverse effects from it. If you go more than 4 weeks the growth is harder IMO to pull in layers. I do a lot of HS. I love it a my clients do too.
                          <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                          • #14
                            I think - after being handstripping dogs for 18 years every day - that it depends on the kind of skinproblems.

                            . a lot of the westies here have skinproblems. my experience is that they get worse when handstripped. Becouse we open up the skin and then bacterias can come down into the skin . And when the dog is handstripped it usually gets itchy for a couple of days and scratches the skin .Then they transfer bacterias/dirt from the backfeet to the skin and bacterias get access to the open hairfollicels.
                            So if they have a sore skin it gets worse after every grooming session. And when I start to clip them its mutch better.


                            Also on the foxterriers ( that I breed) we can see that when they get older ( 7-8 years >) they get some kind of condition when the skin starts to overproduce grease ( I dont know the proper english word...) And the dog looks like it had been dipped in grease.
                            These dogs are hard to strip becouse the hair wont loosen. And if you bath it in a medicated schampoo it looks good for a couple of days - then its greasy again. But if I start to clip them and bath them it gets mutch better.

                            So I think that you must look at eatch dog and decide what to do individually.

                            But after working as a nurse at the vet ( with skinspecialists) for 10 years and beeing handstripping for 18 years I must admit that my opinion is that dogs with skinproblems dont benefit from being handstripped. But I live in another part of the world and there can be differenses due to climate,how the dogs lives and owners work with the coat and things like that. So I will only say that this is mine experience- not the whole truth.

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                            • #15
                              If a dog like a wire fox is "greasy", its from an over active sebaceous gland that is producing too much sebum (oil). These glands are placed in the follicle below the hair shaft. If the hair it not pulled out, or at LEAST carding the back coat (if clippered) to remove the 7 to 15 secondary hairs that are also in there, the follicle will become clogged and then become inflamed. (Schnauzer bumps!)

                              If a dog is prone to getting secondary bacteria infections from scratching, a medicated bath to flush out the follicle should be done, and then sealed with a conditioner to HELP prevent more bacteria from getting in there.

                              It's also a good idea to check diet too at this point. WHY is the dog scratching or what is causing that skin issue.

                              For more information on skin and coat go to petstylist.com and click on Supercoats!

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