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Difference between stripping spaniels and terriers

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  • Difference between stripping spaniels and terriers

    I have only ever handstripped English Cockers (pets and show) but have never done a Terrier. Is is the same kind of stripping for Terriers?

  • #2
    Hand stripping

    No, they are entirely different. Hand stripping of a hard coated terrier involves pulling the hair out of the dog. When the coat starts coming in again, it can be rolled. That means the painstaking job of continually pulling the dead coat out and raking the undercoat weekly. I think you would need to apprentice to someone to learn how to do either of these coat procedures. Hope this helps.

    Cheryl

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    • #3
      That's what you do with an English Cocker as well though, either using stripping knives to remove hair, a coat king, a stone and then hand plucking when you aren't getting enough out this way. I have one Engie I do that has a light coat and just raking with the coat king is enough, but the other one that he lives with has suck a thick coat, I have to spend loads more time on her and hand pluck areas like her sides where the tools get nothing off. I used to think that hand stripping terriers entailed ripping the hairs but it seems like its like doing a spaniel.

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      • #4
        I have not tried stripping either kind of dog, but I have a question. How does a Coat King help with stripping? I used one for the first time today and it worked really good at breaking up the mats, but I don't see how it would remove the dead hair.

        Also how do you tell if the hair is dead? I have Cairn Terriers and with one of them I've noticed that I can go through and remove some of the guard hairs with very little pulling and I've assumed that just meant it was dead hair, but my second terrier's guard hairs never come out easily. I do card him with a pumice stone and I will get the undercoat, but still no guard hairs.

        Today I groomed a Westie that had a really dull coat. He brushed out easily enough (very little hair in the brush) but when I HV dried him it looked like a hair storm. When he was finished being groomed he looked so glossy he could glow in the dark. I assume that what I removed by drying him was the dead coat. Once again I did card him, and some hair came out but nothing compared to drying him.

        I really would like to make Terriers my specialty, but I really need to watch someone strip a dog in real life (I've read about it).
        "The most affectionate creature in the world is a wet dog." -Ambrose Bierce

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        • #5
          Coat King works great on stripping, I use the different sizes on stripping and use them more than anything else. The one thing that you have to do is not empty the hair out of it, let it come out when it's ready- this will increase your drag. It sounds strange, but you actually can get more hair by not emptying the hair. Also, you always strip before bathing, dirt helps grip the coat to get the hair out. Another trick is ear powder. I load the dogs back with ear powder and brush it backwards with my fingers to get it standing up as much as possible, then run the coat king over it. Also with shorter hair you need a rake that has more teeth. Another thing to do before stripping is brush the back with a slicker brush, that seemed to help get the hair ready to be stripped to. This is all things that I have learned about English Cocker stripping, don't know how much of it applies to Terrier stripping!!! Coat kings also work better on longer coats. FURminator, stone, knives and hand plucking works best on shorter coats. I hvae 2 Engies that I ONLY have to use the rakes on because they have light coats, its great, stripping them is ieasy, except for all the shoulder and front leg sculpting with the thinning shears, thats a pain on any of them!

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          • #6
            CockerPoodleDoo-

            Thanks that is great information. Most of the dogs I've tried stripping have been shorter hair dogs.
            "The most affectionate creature in the world is a wet dog." -Ambrose Bierce

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            • #7
              Keyray,

              Stripping means actually pulling the hair OUT. The Coat King doesn't pull the hair out, but cuts the hair. It's sort of like thinning shears on a handle.

              I have an English cocker that NEVER got clipped. But being a pet groomer I do little to no hand stripping. I do some carding but that's about it. I take the coat king over him and put the pattern in that way. It doesn't look as nice if you ask me. I also think stripping is good for their skin.

              Tammy in Utah
              Groomers Helper Affiliate

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              • #8
                OK, let me take a stab at this. When we stripped the Airedales, we'd card as much dead coat out as we could with a knife, then we'd put on our latex gloves (better grip), grabbed the hair and pull it out. We stripped 'em down to their underwear...or worse, naked as jaybirds. If you left undercoat, you strip all that out as soon as the top coat starts coming back. If you aren't at least removing all the top coat, you aren't stripping, you're rolling.

                You do it in stages. The jacket is first, because that's the area that will be longer (other than the legs) when the coat is ready for a show. Then neck is stripped after the jacket, but before the throat. The head and ears come last.

                To properly roll the coat, you card out any undercoat, then lift the top coat in small sections and pluck out anything that's too long.

                Now, the Coat King doesn't just cut the coat. It does pull out a lot of dead coat, especially undercoat. The problem is, it does cut some coat. That leaves you with precious little length to grab hold of and pluck, if you truely intend to strip, rather than roll, the coat.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SpikeyTheYorkie View Post
                  Stripping means actually pulling the hair OUT. The Coat King doesn't pull the hair out, but cuts the hair. It's sort of like thinning shears on a handle.
                  That is probably why not removing the hair from the coat king works like CockerPoodleDoo says. It would actually stop it from cutting the hair.

                  Helly- All I can say is, no wonder groomers don't like to strip the coat.

                  All I have been doing is carding to get out some of the undercoat. Stripping sounds like a whole lot of work. Rolling is probably something I wouldn't mind attempting. I will leave stripping to the professionals.
                  "The most affectionate creature in the world is a wet dog." -Ambrose Bierce

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                  • #10
                    I am glad someone asked this question. I strip terriers. I have an airedale that I hand strip, and I also strip a few Irish, cairn, WHFT, and JRT at the shop. I have competed with a hand strip Irish once, and will do again at Backer. But I am clueless about the sporting breeds. Everyone says they are stripped, yet I don't think I have ever seen anyone actually "strip" them. I see lots of thinners (which are a big no no if you are prepping a terrier for show. Every hair that is cut comes back in soft and lighter in color. Each hair must be ONLY pulled out.)I watched a show breeder groomer an English Setter a month ago, and she never once used a stripping knife, or pulled a single hair from the dog. All bulk thinning, coat king, and blades..and a straight razor. So are the sporting breeds "technically" supposed to be stripped like a terrier? Or are they mostly removing bulk, under coat and thinning to shape?

                    Heather

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Graco22 View Post

                      Every hair that is cut comes back in soft and lighter in color. Each hair must be ONLY pulled out.)

                      Heather
                      That's not always true. I've clipped a lot of terriers who have coat that's just as dark, rich and wirey as it would be if it were stripped. It just depends on the dog.

                      And even if you clip or scissor the hair off, and it comes in soft and faded, all you have to do is wait for the coat to blow completely, strip it, and it'll come back hard and dark. Cutting an existing hair has no effect on hair that hasn't even started to form yet. Once a cut hair falls out or is pulled out, a new, proper hair forms.

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                      • #12
                        I agree with what you are saying somewhat Helly. I have some dogs that are clippered, but I can maintain most of the color and texture with carding afterwards. But I also don't clip terriers super short either. I cringe when I think of a #10 on scotties, westies, dales, etc. If done repeatedly over a few years, its near impossible to get that coat back. I know every die hard terrier show breeder I have talked to over the years thinks you shouldn't touch a harsh terrier with thinners...lol But I sure have "cheated" many a time. I am not such a die hard..and these are pets I am working on, and not a show dog that gets worked on daily while actively showing. So....with sporting dogs..its not the same general concept then? Much of the work is done with thinners, coat kings, etc? Not much actual pulling of the hairs?

                        Heather

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                        • #13
                          An ideal strip from an English Cocker is all pulled whether it be by hand (plucking), using a stone, etc. BUT there are areas you use the blending shears and that is on the front of the legs, the shoulders, the tail and the neck. On the pets that I strip, I will even use the blenders a tad on areas that you aren't supposed to for show, but like I said, they are just pets so I can cheat a little. You also clip the underside of the tail backwards with a #10 like the face and then use the blenders to blend it in to make it look natural. I'm sure all of this is similar for other sporting breeds.

                          My Engie was stripped when I got her and I clip her and when her hair grows out it looks stripped and I do FURminator on her back inbetween groomings and before clipping her back. She is a black and white though and most of them tend to have a more natural shedding coat while the blue and orange roans tend to not shed much. I have some Engies that I clip that could never be stripped due to the years of clippering, their hair all grows in once length and doesn't shed or come out at all.

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