Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone hand strip Airedales?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    A guy with a 5 month old Airedale called and asked if I would hand strip it. I usually hand strip borders, cairns, norwich, norfolk and brussels. Smaller terriers. The Airedale puppy is already 42 lbs. The owner said her father is 90 lbs! I am hoping that the hand stripping will take less than 2 hours but I read online how a breeder hand strips her Airedales for Show and it was all broken down into sections of the body over a week's time. Can you give me some tips, some direction on what I should do with the puppy? should I be trying to set a pattern?

    Also, the owner thinks he's only going to do this once a year. I am hoping I can convince him to do it at least every 3 months although I'd rather roll the coat monthly.

    Comment


    • #17
      Ive had to handstrip one and it was just not worth the money. We charge $60 extra an hour but I just felt way to guilty charging her almost 150 extra so I didn't get my monies worth for the time I spent. He was super cute and sweet though!

      Click image for larger version

Name:	hs1.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	70.3 KB
ID:	1121574Click image for larger version

Name:	hs2.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	73.2 KB
ID:	1121575

      Comment


      • #18
        I have settled into a pattern of running a curry comb over Opal's jacket and fluffing her legs about 3 or 4 times a week. It takes less than 5 minutes and we do it before running out the door in the morning. About every 3 weeks I do a "real" groom. I had been using a comb like a carding tool and a handler told me that was what was making Opal's jacket stick up. Now I use a rubber curry comb and she looks much better. I don't see being able to keep an Airedale stripped without doing little bits weekly so I don't see me doing this on clients' dogs. Heck, I can't even keep a small terrier stripped by only seeing the dog every 3 months.

        I think in one of my posts I said Opal might be part Welsh. A retired Airedale breeder who I met in the county where I live said Opal was all Airedale, just on the small side. I told him who her breeder was and he knew the person...said he was good.

        Comment


        • #19
          I do a lot of Handstripping, Not only do my own dogs need it for show (I have German Wirehaireds) But I have A LOT of clientele that pay me to do it, Generally its a visit every 4-6 weeks for Bath and light stripping and every other time for a Good roll to newer growth, all of my owners maintain at home and are religious in seeing me. as for the $$ issue, I generally charge $85 + for the Bath and light strip on them and $150+ on the roll-over People pay it, because by the time they leave their dogs feel good and are happy. Also if hand stripping is something you want to do, and the owners are devoted to the maitinence, you can always ask them to come in several times, to help keep your days more open ( I have a cairn client who brings her boy in 3 days strait, because its less stressful to him, and his coat turns out beautifully)

          Comment


          • #20
            I don't strip airedales, but I do see border terriers and small wirehaired dogs, and yes, people pay for it. For those of you who are not charging clients full rates, quit that! We charge a very firm hourly rate. I suggest all dogs come in once a month, to keep it maintained and fair for me and the dog. If they skip out and I only see them twice a year, guess what, their price is double what they would have been paying monthly, since it takes more time and it is done hourly. Those who want this specialty service are willing to pay for it

            Comment


            • #21
              I used to strip for clients, but had to stop. It seemed like all my handstrip customers were so badly behaved and the owners would not listen to my advice (bathing the dog twice a week at home, completele wrecking the skin and coat) and would not stick w/ the schedule we had agreed upon. So, I fired 'em all! I had one wire fox that I assumed had just stopped coming to see me as I hadn't stripped him in about 1.5 years. Right after I fired all my strip clients, they called to get the dog in-are ya friggin kidding me? Not to mention the dog was just terrible. My shoulder started to hurt terribly after every strip, honestly that was the biggest reason, but due to all the other reasons, I was not sad to see any of the dogs go. I still get my stripping fix in though because I adopted an airedale in August! Beejl: Airedales are not supposed to be huge dogs, the breed standard only calls for 23", females may be a bit smaller, which is a solidly medium sized dog. My Merlin is 24" and only 51#. A slightly smaller female w/ less muscle tone could easily weigh 40# and still be correct for the breed. Honestly I thought airedales were all supposed to be fairly large and 60-75# based upon the clientele in my area. It wasn't until I got an airedale and started doing some research into the breed that I found that I have just been grooming behemoths and one, maybe 2 of my airedale clients were the right size. I am certainly not saying Merlin's breeder was any good, he came from a horrific puppy mill, but he is the size an airedale is supposed to be, and he certainly has the correct terrier temperament. I finally bit the bullet and stripped down his jacket last week and stripped down the afro on the top of his head yesterday. It still needs some fine tuning, but the bulk of the work is done. It took longer than I wanted it to due to him being very overgrown, I was very much enjoying his "puppy" look. The rescue shaved him down due to full body matting and I had to wait for it to grow out, then I was just enjoying his fluffy cuteness, shouldn't have waited so long! Now I can just start into rolling the coat and it will be so much less work. I don't think I would ever want to strip and airedale for a client.
              I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
              -Michelangelo

              Comment


              • #22
                LOL!

                [QUOTE=gr8danlvr1;616108]I used to strip for clients, but had to stop.

                I couldn't help myself, I just kept laughing! Sorry gr8danlvr1, that first sentence just hit my funnybone tonight. Good thing we are all groomers or someone might think the wrong thing about you!

                Comment


                • #23
                  [QUOTE=ardito40;620034]
                  Originally posted by gr8danlvr1 View Post
                  I used to strip for clients, but had to stop.

                  I couldn't help myself, I just kept laughing! Sorry gr8danlvr1, that first sentence just hit my funnybone tonight. Good thing we are all groomers or someone might think the wrong thing about you!
                  Well, ardito, I'd likely make better tips!
                  I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                  -Michelangelo

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Does your Airedale mind you stripping the legs? I have done a little stripping on my Parson's face, but he won't let me do his body without pulling away - not sure if I should just leave the poor boy be. Lol. Oh well. His face looks nice where its stripped, lays really flat, I like it. He isnt bothered at all by that on his face.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      How do you tell what to do with a coat to keep it in shape? How does rolling work?

                      I have one client with two hand strip Westies that I do every 4-6 weeks and the owner does zero maintenance at home. Stripping them down to the desired length is pretty much impossible, so I usually end up stripping out whatever comes free fairly easily and then running clippers over the jacket to set the length. The result of this is that I can never tell which hairs are the older, longer ones, so I just have to pull everything gently with a pumice stone to determine what's ready to go. It always takes me 1-2 hours to strip each one, which seems like a really long time to spend just stripping the jacket and pulling a little from the head and furnishings.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        My guess is you need to stop using the clippers. Handstripping is more of a process, not a haircut which is more instant satisfaction. It is not usually going to look exactly the same every time. Sometimes the saddle will be shorter because it just needed more work, other times you will leave it a bit longer because you did more last time. My best handstrip client was a standard schnauzer on a religious 6 week rebook. I wouldn't always strip every area very hard each visit. One week I would strip down the jacket real good, the next visit I'd focus more on the head and neck, then the third visit I'd just do a decent clean up of both, fourth visit that jacket might need a good hard strip again. I always went over everything a little, but if it looked good and not to long, I would just clean up the area that week and not spend a lot of time on it. Probably for a westie, you would strip the saddle down well, next visit focus more on the head and featherings, then saddle again. I imagine a westie in a good schedule might take me 30-45 min. to strip out the saddle 15 min for the head, 15 for the featherings. My standard schnauzer took me 4 hours over all, that was usually w/ a 30 minute lunch, a ton of corporate interruptions, and a bath & brush as well.
                        I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                        -Michelangelo

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by JOLIE View Post
                          Does your Airedale mind you stripping the legs? I have done a little stripping on my Parson's face, but he won't let me do his body without pulling away - not sure if I should just leave the poor boy be. Lol. Oh well. His face looks nice where its stripped, lays really flat, I like it. He isnt bothered at all by that on his face.
                          My Airedale doesn't care one way or the other. He really is pretty awesome. He wasn't ever groomed until he was rescued from his puppy mill at a year old. He is so good for the whole process, even the toenails. I feel like he just knew he was meant to be a pretty boy. As far as customers go I had noticed that the ones who hated the legs stripped were the ones who hated even having their legs touched at all. Like they would react the same whether I was simply petting their legs, brushing, combing, clipping or stripping. Maybe set your guy up on a table every few days and run your hands down his legs, desensitizing him. Keep doing this until he is good for it.
                          I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                          -Michelangelo

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by gr8danlvr1 View Post
                            My Airedale doesn't care one way or the other. He really is pretty awesome. He wasn't ever groomed until he was rescued from his puppy mill at a year old. He is so good for the whole process, even the toenails. I feel like he just knew he was meant to be a pretty boy. As far as customers go I had noticed that the ones who hated the legs stripped were the ones who hated even having their legs touched at all. Like they would react the same whether I was simply petting their legs, brushing, combing, clipping or stripping. Maybe set your guy up on a table every few days and run your hands down his legs, desensitizing him. Keep doing this until he is good for it.
                            Yeah, he hates having his feet touched too, Ive been touching them every day to desensitize him. Good call on doing it to the legs too, on the table. Ill try it. I realized that I cant strip his legs because it hasnt been long enough since I clipped him, duh. Lol. Facepalm. Ill let him grow out some more.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Thanks Gr8danelvr!
                              The owner is unbelievably picky and wants them to look perfect each time. I think I'll get a DVD and arm myself with some serious knowledge so I have solid footing to stand on when I tell her that's she's wrong. She hates to hear that, but my life will get so much easier if I can start doing these Westies properly instead of mucking around for 4 hours every time they come in.

                              It really doesn't help that one of them has curly hair that sticks up in every direction, plus fat rolls all down her back and bad knees. And her momma thinks that's the show quality one! I just try not to laugh when she tells me how that dog was gonna get her championship if her handler hadn't retired. Sure, if you say so ma'am.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I get some Terrier owners in the salon who want good coat & color but can't seem to commit to a solid rotation or to pay for all the work it'll take. A lot of times learning to urge & educate them just enough, but not so much that you give away how impossible it is to genuinely keep a Terrier up without the dedicated time and $$, can make all the difference. Most owners just don't get it, or some do well for awhile and then fall off the stripping wagon a few visits in. Then its up to us to pick up their slack--which is next to impossible if we take us busting our butts and not being compensated off the table as an option. And we should...
                                I'd say one of the most common threads that'll get a group of groomers to roll their eyes and groan in syncopation is how to keep Terriers in good coat in the pet salon rotation.
                                For those people, to keep color & texture up and to lessen the time it takes me to get them tightened and thinned and stay in good color- I do a 50/50 technique. I learned it first from Michell Evans and it's saved me a lot of effort, aggravation, and helped my time management/profitability with those Terrier people who aren't willing to commit. It gives you a great looking Terrier groom that is difficult to find at other salons and won't kill your body or your revenue for the day's efforts.

                                I will initially rake out the coat heavily before the bath. First the coarse rake, and then onto the fine. Then I will card the coat with a dull coarse stripping knife. This diminishes the bulk of the undercoat very nicely.
                                Then I will roll out the longest (and oldest) cycle of coat. I do this by hand, quickly, and careful not to pull any area too heavily so its balanced.
                                Then I apply a coat astringent. I use witch hazel all over the coat applied heavily with a spritzer bottle and worked in by hand and brush it thru with a board bristle brush or a sisal brush. I let that witch hazel set on the skin while I do the sani and nail work and clipper any flatwork needed like parts of the head, ears & throat and the butterfly areas. The astringent addresses any possible irritation and when groomers completely hand strip out a dog the astringent is also use to tighten up the skin and address oil as well.
                                These steps on a medium LLT take me about 20-30 minutes.
                                Then into the tub. I always bathe with a benzoyl peroxide shampoo. This type of shampoo works wonderfully at flushing out the follicles and at breaking up built up oils without stripping the coat too harshly. ~If you use a Terrier shampoo on a dog that you see once every 6-8+ weeks, you'll possibly find the skin isn't happy at being stripped that much, and the coat will suffer for it.
                                After the bath, I do a Terrier coat oil lightly massaged over the entire dog. I like Happy Coat from ShowSeason, but you can use whichever you prefer. The purpose for this is not just to replenish oils and seal coat, but it also helps introduce a beautiful luster to the dog's coat that gives the best color once the coat is dried because it permeated the hair shaft and allows light to most deeply penetrate it, resulting the deepest color and shine. After applying it, I rinse the coat very well under a long warm rinse. The warm rinse keeps the skin open and helps me to quickly blow out any more loose hair with the HV during drying to get the coat evenly tighter all around. You don't want to leave a heavy coat oil on a 6-8 week rotation dog because it will do nothing but tack up, attract dirt, and result in yellowing and coat breakage. So rinse it well.
                                Then I HV until the coat is nearly dry on the jacket and completely dry on the legs and head- always with the growth of coat so that I set the coat lay nice and tight. I allow the dog to finish ambient drying of the jacket area while I work his legs and head with a little pulling if needed, and with the thinner shears to tidy everything and finish a nice headpiece per the breed.
                                Then on the jacket, once its dried you'll see longer hair standing up that'll need to get grabbed. For those longest hairs, I will clipper the coat with a skip toothed blade of a longer length- say a #4 or a #5 skip to get it uniform length and tightened nicely. Minimal clippering= better texture and color and healthier skin.
                                The result of pulling the longest coat stage and removing a good lot of built up undercoat, followed by a coat cleansing that cleans the skin but doesn't over strip and the oil that seals the hair follicle so it has luster and catches light nicely, is amazing to see.
                                When you clipper the coat as the last step, its really just to tighten things and get them uniform in length so that the before and after is noticeable and doesn't wreck the coat quality by just clipping off dead coat and leaving it to build up in the skin.
                                The whole process on a Lakie or Irish sized dog takes me 2 hours, on an Aire about 2.5 hours. Out here I charge $60 (M)- $90 (L) for a dog like this and the owners pay that happily for a Terrier that looks like a Terrier and can still come in every 6-8 weeks. If I were in the city I'd add $15-$20 to that fee easily.
                                And not a lot of groomers can pull this technique off BTW, because you have to know what you are doing with stripping and keeping up a Terrier coat, but know what you can still cut corners on without sacrificing the outcome for the dog-- so it creates a niche for your business as well.
                                Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                                www.ChrisSertzel.com

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X