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HELP New stripping knives

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  • HELP New stripping knives

    I bought a set of CC stripping knives and a groomer friend of mine told me that I need to "season" them before I use them. I have never heard that before so I asked her what that ment and she said another groomer told her to let them sit it quick stop to dull the blade. I am very new to hand stripping and the knives I have been using are used so I have never had to worry about this before. So my question is has anyone ever heard or done this before???

  • #2
    You will find references to this method in threads about hand stripping. You need to dull the blades otherwise it cuts the hair instead of pulling it out.

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    • #3
      yup, dip it in water, then quick stop, set aside or in a baggie for a couple days.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by brownlikewoah View Post
        yup, dip it in water, then quick stop, set aside or in a baggie for a couple days.
        This is very interesting!!

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        • #5
          It's true. I don't know why they don't come not as sharp or pre seasoned.

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          • #6
            I know, I'm going to sound like an odd ball here, but I've never found this to be true. If used incorrectly, yes, you need to dull them. If held properly, you can strip and not cut. At least this is what I've found. I will ask around some more, and I realize I'm way on left field here. It's all about your procedure. Laid flat = flat = you can card out undercoat. Turned up, with your pressed to outer coat, you can pull. If you twist, you will cut - especially with a new knife. It is a knife. We don't want to cut, we want to card or pull.

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            • #7
              I have a vague memory of hearing at a trade show that the C ones come predulled. I dnt n w if I remember that right or not....also, I thin they are SS and if they are QS will not dull them. I have to disagree with Arlaede. I have found it true that many come with sharp points and edges and need to be dulled somewhat to prevent you from cutting the dogs skin with the toothed edge. Pearsons say they are predulled as well and yet my detailer would cut a dog with its sharp edges.
              We run the edge along cement, brick, whatever we can find until the outside teeth are smoother and less sharp, and insert and remove the knives into kitty litter or coarse sand (this can take a lot to time) to dull the inside edge if it's sharp.
              We have had the conversation before about how it is impossible for companies to manufacture a dull knife. Because of the manufacturing process it is impossible.
              I have also used a dremel with a sanding paper wheel (its flexible, not a solid ring) to go over the edges and it will dull them as well, but I do not recommend it for expensive knives. I use my new ones on every dirty golden, lab, etc that comes in to dull them as well.....
              <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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              • #8
                Shoot! I just bought one at the tradeshow, and have been using it without dulling it thinking I'm doing wonders for their coat. Oops! Will put in a bag with qwick stop tomorrow!
                amanda
                ~You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who cannot pay you back~

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by NeveahsMommy View Post
                  Shoot! I just bought one at the tradeshow, and have been using it without dulling it thinking I'm doing wonders for their coat. Oops! Will put in a bag with qwick stop tomorrow!
                  You will know if you are doing it correctly by looking at the base of the hair you are plucking. If you see the bulb (I don't really know what the term for this is) at the base of the hair, then you HAVE been doing wonders for their coat. Once you have been doing it for a while you will just know the feel of it. Cutting the hair has a different feel from plucking the hair. Just because your knife is new, doesn't mean you have been doing it wrong or that your knife is too sharp-some are and some aren't.
                  I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                  -Michelangelo

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                  • #10
                    You an tell cut hair by looking at it. If its layered and breaking where the knife sits its cutting or breaking hair. Otherwise its fine. Dont fix what aint broke!
                    <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                    • #11
                      Oh, okay. It does feel different, but I don't know if that's because the furminator and stripping knife are used differently. I'm used to the furminator, which you use almost perpendicular the blade to the hair. The stripping knife I use flat, so maybe that is why it feels different? Idk!! Does it matter how dull you make the blade? As in, if I am already using it correctly and not cutting the hair rather than plucking it out, will it still work well if I dull it in qwick stop? Which brings me to yet another question - If they dull out, do you have to replace them?
                      amanda
                      ~You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who cannot pay you back~

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                      • #12
                        are you raking it over the coat the way you use the furminator? If so this is called carding a too sharp knife is a little less important when used in this way. In fact this method will help to dull the blade a bit more. I don't use my stripping knife for that. The way I was talking of using it was to pinch the hair between my and the blade and physically pluck the hair out of the skin, this is stripping. When the knife is too sharp it will cut the hair where you hold it against the blade instead of allowing you to pluck the whole length of hair out. Hope that helps.
                        I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                        -Michelangelo

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gr8danlvr1 View Post
                          are you raking it over the coat the way you use the furminator? If so this is called carding a too sharp knife is a little less important when used in this way. In fact this method will help to dull the blade a bit more. I don't use my stripping knife for that. The way I was talking of using it was to pinch the hair between my and the blade and physically pluck the hair out of the skin, this is stripping. When the knife is too sharp it will cut the hair where you hold it against the blade instead of allowing you to pluck the whole length of hair out. Hope that helps.
                          Ah! Makes sense to me. Thanks!

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                          • #14
                            A knife that is too sharp WILL damage coat even when carding. It pulls the outer cuticle of the hair and makes it frizzy and frayed looking. JFYI
                            <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gr8danlvr1 View Post
                              are you raking it over the coat the way you use the furminator?
                              No, I drag it through the coat flat. So that the side of the knife is flat against the coat. I just copy the way Jodi Murphy does it in her DVDs.
                              amanda
                              ~You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who cannot pay you back~

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