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  • Scottie

    I have a client that has a Scottie that is 4 years old- he has always been clippered. She recently bought a Westie and I am handstripping her. Now she wants me to start handstripping her Scottie. How do I work him into that . I just clippered him a week ago with a #5f breed cut. His coat is very soft. What steps should I do? Will he even be able to be stripped?

  • #2
    Try a test spot, strip about a quarter size down to his jammies and see how it grows back. If it comes back with the proper texture then go for it. Strip it all down and start over. If not, then it's not really worth it. A 4-year old that has never been stripped may not take well to it either. I would warn her ahead of time that you'll try, but it may not work out.

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    • #3
      If his coat is very soft, it's unlikely that his coat will take to stripping because it's gotten used to clipping, and the coat growth cycle has been compromised. You can try to strip him - granted, he probably won't take to it well, because the follicles (where the hair grows) aren't used to releasing the hair like it's supposed to. For most guys, you would have to strip him nearly bald, over time, and start new, letting the regrowth come in and may have to strip him down bald again before you'll see real improvement in the texture of the coat. Now, this is what I've been told by many a Scotty Show person, when I learned how to strip. I have a rescued Scotty that had been clippered his whole life and when I tried to strip his coat, it just didn't work out too well. BUT - there's always the possibility that it will take. Just have to get him at the right time where the coat wants to blow out (when it's looser, and doesn't take too much effort to pull out a significant amount).

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      • #4
        ooooh 4 years of clipping. Totally agree with everyone else so far - its gonna be tough and may not work out well at all. I have done a similar thing with a few Wire Fox Terriers over the years and it has worked out well on the saddle/jacket area but I continued to clipper/scissor the furnishings and head.

        Don't clip the dog anymore and get him in in the next couple of weeks for mucking out, FURminator is great for this. Do this regularly over the next few weeks. His change of coat cycle will be greatly altered and extended, all over the place basically. Try plucking his tail to see if this area has blown and maybe try some of the jacket - see how loose the coat is. If ready pluck the area down to the 'fuzzies', just a thin covering of short coat. Concentrate on the jacket and tail and as the coat grows back start a cycle of carding again. Allow new top coat to grow in again and blow and then strip again. If the coat still has not come through its down to fuzzies again and see how it goes repeating it all over again.
        If you are constantly carding the coat and checking for blown hair and then removing it once its blown you may be able to establish a working cycle again- hopefully. Good luck!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by K.Clyburn View Post
          If his coat is very soft, it's unlikely that his coat will take to stripping because it's gotten used to clipping, and the coat growth cycle has been compromised. You can try to strip him - granted, he probably won't take to it well, because the follicles (where the hair grows) aren't used to releasing the hair like it's supposed to. For most guys, you would have to strip him nearly bald, over time, and start new, letting the regrowth come in and may have to strip him down bald again before you'll see real improvement in the texture of the coat. Now, this is what I've been told by many a Scotty Show person, when I learned how to strip. I have a rescued Scotty that had been clippered his whole life and when I tried to strip his coat, it just didn't work out too well. BUT - there's always the possibility that it will take. Just have to get him at the right time where the coat wants to blow out (when it's looser, and doesn't take too much effort to pull out a significant amount).
          actually
          you wont need to put him through the pain of being stripped to the skin.
          My mentor told me this. I had a rough that I didnt bother stripping for a long time and had to strip him for a show. She told me to just shave him down as close as you can. I used #7 and let the coat grow back a bit more and began stripping from there. It worked REALLY WELL and made everything so much easier, especially for my terrier. He hates to be stripped and hes 8 years old.
          Good luck!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by K.Clyburn View Post
            If his coat is very soft, it's unlikely that his coat will take to stripping because it's gotten used to clipping, and the coat growth cycle has been compromised. You can try to strip him - granted, he probably won't take to it well, because the follicles (where the hair grows) aren't used to releasing the hair like it's supposed to. For most guys, you would have to strip him nearly bald, over time, and start new, letting the regrowth come in and may have to strip him down bald again before you'll see real improvement in the texture of the coat. Now, this is what I've been told by many a Scotty Show person, when I learned how to strip. I have a rescued Scotty that had been clippered his whole life and when I tried to strip his coat, it just didn't work out too well. BUT - there's always the possibility that it will take. Just have to get him at the right time where the coat wants to blow out (when it's looser, and doesn't take too much effort to pull out a significant amount).
            actually
            you wont need to put him through the pain of being stripped to the skin.
            My mentor told me this. I had a rough that I didnt bother stripping for a long time and had to strip him for a show. She told me to just shave him down as close as you can. I used #7 and let the coat grow back a bit more and began stripping from there. It worked REALLY WELL and made everything so much easier, especially for my terrier. He hates to be stripped and hes 8 years old.
            Good luck!

            Comment

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