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3 Hour Hand Strip

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  • 3 Hour Hand Strip

    A Client brought in a Border Terrier with a coat longer than a Carin T and wanted it handstripped in one session. He was asked to do it in a series of appointments but wouldn't, there was no convincing him otherwise. He insisted his previous Groomer was able to completely do it in 3 hours, charged $85., was a Westminster Show Groomer, had credentials, and he provided before and after pics (long before/short after). Client said dog was HS twice a year, last stripped in August, didn't say if any maintenance stripping was done in between. Also said his last Groomer had appeared to have "dropped off the face of the earth"/number disconnected. Well... after 3 hours of fur flying the dog was still not down to a short coat. It looked a whole lot better but was still somewhat long and wavy on the body though Considerably thinned out (got a trash can full on hair out of the little guy); face, ears, tail, and legs looked good/shorter. The dog really tolerated the HS well, the coat wasn't coming out very easy. I researched a breed book which says a Border T "requires little routine grooming, and only a slight tidying up", with a picture of a dog with a very short coat. I also went to the AKC site for breed reference and it said a Border T should "be able to be exhibited in almost his natural state". Should the HS been able to be done in one 3 hour session? Needless to say the Client was Not happy with the end result and said he'd just have to do it again in a month, I'm sure he meant at another shop. Well, at least the next Groomer will have a head start. Any opinions on what went wrong?

  • #2
    You need Mr Terrier on this one. I know he does regular hand stripping at his salon.
    "The most affectionate creature in the world is a wet dog." -Ambrose Bierce

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    • #3
      3 hours for handstripping a full coat is really pushing it.
      To speed things up I usually go over the coat first with a FURminator. This cards all the loose hair (this speeds things up a lot) - then I go over it with hand stripping.
      I have 2 wired haired daschunds coming in on the same day next week. One is almost a year old (hair isn't ALL there yet) and the other has not been done in about 10 months. Both have to be hand stripped. I'll have my work cut out for me that day
      I'm really just a little dog in a big dog's body (I really should cut down on those milk bones).

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      • #4
        HI,

        It sounds like there's a problem with your technique. What kind of knife are you using? Were you using any chalk or ear powder to help you get a grip on the hair?


        It sounds like you are letting the hair slip instead of pulling it all out. If using a knife, everthing between your and the knife should be pulled out. If not, that could be why it looked wavy too... it can damage the hair being left.

        I'll be doing a hands on seminar at the Nanhall school in NC on May 2 and 3.

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        • #5
          borders

          gotta say I do it in 3 hours(or less)- when you know what u r doing and the coat's blown it is one of the easier breeds to HS- but I charge twice that. You should not try to do a pattern on a dog who is done that infrequently - just take the whole jacket down, head and ears. Butt and throat can be thinning sheared.
          Some people- correctly so- just want to pull the dead coat to keep color and texture correct. It's a rough and ready dog who doesn't really matt or need fancy patterns
          Shame this process is so misunderstood

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          • #6
            Part of the problem could be that the coat wasn't blown yet. Blown coat strips out quicker and more easily than coat that isn't loose yet. A couple of weeks with longer days could make all the difference, especially if it gets sunny. Sunlight triggers seasonal shedding.

            Another problem could be the type of coat the dog has. Some Borders have shorter coat, some have a single coat (incorrect) and some have a longer coat than they should. It's easy to quickly strip out a correct coat or short coat. The long coats can take more time.

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            • #7
              I think

              That a twice a year dogs coat would be blown. You need to work systematicaly , start in one spot, say behind the ear and work back towards the end of the dog in rows.Make sure you hold the skin securely with your other hand so as to not allow play in the skin. Make sure that you see skin or undercoat as you go and make it look the same (you will see skin if no undercoat is present) all over the dog. Use a stripping knife that won't cut the hair otherwise you will end up with stubble and broken off hairs. Three hours is more than enough time to pull off this coat . It all needs to come off and lots of people do twice a year. They don't care about show coat. That is the way it was done many years ago before our fancy trims evolved.
              Sometimes a dogs coat will self shed and you may have a new layer of hair coming in , thats always a plus.

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              • #8
                It so depends on the shape of the coat. My puppy's coat (he's 5 mos.) wouldn't budge until last week. I started pulling a bit today and it comes right out. He thought I was killing him a couple of weeks ago when I tried to pull, but today you could tell it felt GOOD!

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                • #9
                  Scott, would it be easier to strip a coat out that has not been bathed first or when the coat is clean and then doing a light after bath strip?

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                  • #10
                    You always strip on a dirty coat- it gives you more grip.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mr.Terrier View Post
                      HI,

                      It sounds like there's a problem with your technique. What kind of knife are you using? Were you using any chalk or ear powder to help you get a grip on the hair?


                      It sounds like you are letting the hair slip instead of pulling it all out. If using a knife, everthing between your and the knife should be pulled out. If not, that could be why it looked wavy too... it can damage the hair being left.

                      I'll be doing a hands on seminar at the Nanhall school in NC on May 2 and 3.
                      Medium Coat and Ear Knife Strippers, a rubber , just a little ear powder used on a clean coat. Would definitely like more info. on your upcoming seminar. There are so many Terriers & T Mixes out there. I need to make sure I have the right technique.

                      Thanks for everyones replies and tips.

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                      • #12
                        Scott - Do you have any more information on that Seminar?

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                        • #13
                          dirty vs clean

                          I know this is an age old issue but if it's grip you want chalk will give you grip. I always ask the dog be bathed and dry the day before so there is less bacteria on the skin to get into the hair follicals left open when you pull the hair out. I have seen reactions from filthy coats, my teacher would put alcohol on the dirty coats but it makes me cringe so I opt for clean skin. Living in the country clean vs dirty is just not the same as city grime because it's a dif kind of dirt in the city. Also if you have a double coat, bathing puffs up the under coat and sets it up better for a Coat King and then it will not take the guard hair - just grabs the fuzziest stuff and leaves the wire which u can then have a better idea of what to pluck and what to leave. You learn to feel(see) the dif as you rake. Especially if you get one of those coats that self sheds and has a new coat started under the dead one. Some breeds are just easier but some time it's simply the jacket and each breed has several kinds of coats, not all worth plucking.
                          We are talking pets here not show dogs...
                          and I like #1 All Systems Crisp Coat for wire jackets to bathe with.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 4Newfs View Post
                            Scott - Do you have any more information on that Seminar?
                            Hayley's working on the flyer and I will post it as soon as I get it. Otherwise you can contact her at nanhall.com

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