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How to make bowed legs look straight?

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  • How to make bowed legs look straight?

    I want to try and make some bowed legs looking straight. Any ideas?

  • #2
    It requires more hair

    The downside to camouflaging bowed legs is that you have to have enough hair to make a 'column' leg, which means you will have less hair on the edges of the leg that bow out or in the most, and more hair on the concave areas.

    All you really have to do is look at those legs before you scissor, and feel where the bows in the legs are. Then scissor your column without cutting skin and bone (lol) on the bowed parts.

    The problem/downside is that unless you have an owner who keeps up the coat well, the extra hair you left to disguise the crooked legs and make them look straight will come back in all matted and you will have to shave down and show those wonky legs!

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    • #3
      On show dogs it is worth the time and effort to try and straighten out legs but on pet dogs it is not. Mostly because on really crooked it legs it requires you to scalp in certain areas and pad in others. While that might look fab as the dog walks out the door, like Debbiedogs said, you will be stripping all that padding off the next time the dog comes in.

      One of my own Poodley-things has an absolutely wretched bow-fiddle front and I do have him grown out and fluffy and scissored on the front legs. But I also have the luxury of doing him once a week to keep it looking nice and free of mats. The average pet owner isn't going to bother.

      If you really want to scissor crooked legs into straight columns it is pretty simple - fluff dry the legs, back comb them to stand straight out and scissor them into straight columns. It isn't rocket science.

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      • #4
        I'm assuming you mean on front legs that are turned out? I disagree that its not worth the effort on pets. (as long as the owner takes care of it) Ain't no reason why correcting that fault should be an issue. It requires scissoring the inner leg tight. You leave more hair up by the elbow and tighter down towards the ankle where it bows. I usually scissor the back of the leg pretty tight too, and leave more hair on the front and sides. The real tough part though is rounding the foot. You have to make a faux foot or pretend its more round when they are usually hare feet.

        If you look at this picture you can see his toes point out towards the side instead of the front. Pardon the ****** cell phone quality pic, this is probably like 4 years old. LOL.

        http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...1202516132.jpg
        There are 3 different kinds of people in this world: Dog people, cat people, and rational people who don't have a problem liking two things at the same time.

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        • #5
          That was really helpful, thanks.

          Originally posted by OntheBRINKofDisaster View Post
          I'm assuming you mean on front legs that are turned out? I disagree that its not worth the effort on pets. (as long as the owner takes care of it) Ain't no reason why correcting that fault should be an issue. It requires scissoring the inner leg tight. You leave more hair up by the elbow and tighter down towards the ankle where it bows. I usually scissor the back of the leg pretty tight too, and leave more hair on the front and sides. The real tough part though is rounding the foot. You have to make a faux foot or pretend its more round when they are usually hare feet.

          If you look at this picture you can see his toes point out towards the side instead of the front. Pardon the ****** cell phone quality pic, this is probably like 4 years old. LOL.

          http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...1202516132.jpg

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          • #6
            Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair.

            My own dog (rescue) is a dwarf, and she has scoliosis/lordosis, bowed legs, out turned elbows, herring gut, and short rib cage. I keep her in 3-4" all over so I can scissor in the shape that I want.

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            • #7
              Nice job it does help.

              Originally posted by OntheBRINKofDisaster View Post
              I'm assuming you mean on front legs that are turned out? I disagree that its not worth the effort on pets. (as long as the owner takes care of it) Ain't no reason why correcting that fault should be an issue. It requires scissoring the inner leg tight. You leave more hair up by the elbow and tighter down towards the ankle where it bows. I usually scissor the back of the leg pretty tight too, and leave more hair on the front and sides. The real tough part though is rounding the foot. You have to make a faux foot or pretend its more round when they are usually hare feet.

              If you look at this picture you can see his toes point out towards the side instead of the front. Pardon the ****** cell phone quality pic, this is probably like 4 years old. LOL.

              http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...1202516132.jpg

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