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  • Komondor Help needed

    Ok call me crazy , a potential client called today and asked me if I would groom her Komondor, 8 month old puppy 85 lbs, wants to have her in coards, I told her I have only seen them at dog shows and never done one before but she is desprate to find someone and I kinda like a challange but told her I would have to do some research and call me back when she gets back from vacation in May.
    SOOOO , what am I potentially getting my self into. I know that they have to dry naturally but what is the proper way to bathe? and how do you cord, do you do it before bathing? How long should it take ? ( to work on the cord and to actually do the bathing part)

    Thnaks

  • #2
    I've never done one but always wanted too. I read some on notes from the grooming table. Its a pretty intense process. I think the cords have to soak and you need to wring them out and dry each one sepratly. Please someone correct me if I'm wrong. You are so lucky!

    Sent from my SGH-T959V using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      I would never call you crazy.
      Been there, done that, 3 times over w/ pet Komondor owners over the years.
      It was a futile disaster.
      I was crazy.

      The owners really need to "enlighten" themselves as to cord DEVELOPMENT and MAINTAINENCE if they want their dog in that coat.
      It involves them. They need to talk to their breeders and stay in contact w/ their breeders and get you info from their breeders.

      IMO...it is NOT something a groomer can "do" and get the same results as these owners see when they watch the BOB mop flying around the ring at Westminster on their TVs.

      Bathing (back then) was no huge deal, I only set 3/4s of the day aside (after cords were started but not maintained by owners...who just confused mats w/ cords...) Woolite + a small amount of bluing in cooler water, soak the dog in a tub of it, squeeze, rinse, squeeze, rinse, squeeze, rinse, look at the clock, wonder why you are doing all this, squeeze, rinse, squeeze, rinse.
      Then...fast forward a few months or a year...#7 AO.

      Maybe you'll have better luck.
      I'd hate to be the one to discourage you...so hopefully someone else will pop on and say how easy it is....
      Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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      • #4
        Oh, PS,...and at 8 months, good chance the pup is already matted. Unless you got a diamond in the rough owner.
        Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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        • #5
          Yeah

          I have talked to alot of people about this breed, and learned quite a bit of how the cords work, etc., then had one customer ask me about it, I told them I knew nothing about it (lied) and they should find someone else. I would love to see one properly done but i dont want to do it, esp. when the owner wouldnt do the work at home, (they told me they wouldnt), they thought it would be easier, because the dog would just "do it" naturally. Basically they thought it was just matts that they wouldnt have to mess with, and could get away with not grooming. I hope for your sake they will work on it with you. If not I would say bye-bye.

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          • #6
            We did one years ago and yes, unless the owner is participating at home with maintenance, I would not do it again. Way too much work. I would keep the dog for two days and charge 1,000.00 to give you an idea how much work it is. There is a reason you don't see many Komadors in full coat except for the show ring.

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            • #7
              I have done a few.
              Cording should be done before you bath. Cords are separated by hand, rolled and set and some trimming done as well as sani work before the bath. Then the bath consists of wetting the coat by supping water over the dog or a very light pressure wetting of the coat with a nozzle. Simple cleansing shampoo is diluted and squeezed into the coat section by section by hand- if you have a recirc, the pressure should be light and lots of squeezing the coat to work the lather up and not break up cords or alter the lay of coat at the skin surface. No cream conditioner on cords. But some may have another opinion, and I am not a master on this breed. This pup is young, so it may take some work to get the coat lay and cords to emerge properly, so separating them and generous rolling as well as at home upkeep or regular salon upkeep is needed.
              I have always done it the way a handler taught me many years back, and it has always worked well. The dog stands in the tub, I run a few gallons of warm water in, cup it over and squeeze the coat, empty the tub, add the warm water & shampoo, agitate to mix it, cup that over the dog and squeeze the coat section by section very thoroughly to get them well clean, empty the bath water, run in rinse water, cup and squeeze that thru, repeat to get all the shampoo out, and then towel/squeeze dry the coat section by section to damp. Let them kennel dry slowly to almost dry and they can either go home damp, or nearly dry from the fan or kennel drier. At home they'll need to know to keep the dog outta the muck until they are dried thru.
              Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
              www.ChrisSertzel.com

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              • #8
                http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/CordedDogsGroomHelp/

                This is a great online group to answer questions. I have worked cords on a toy poodle before but would never attempt a Komondor......I am not that much of a glutton for punishment.
                <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                • #9
                  I won't groom corded breeds at all for this very reason.I have no experience what so ever with them and will refuse a client over ruining a dogs coat for a few bucks .Unless this client is willing to pay you an hourly amount to groom this dog to breed standards I'd send her to someone with experience.JMO

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the input and the detailed instructions on bathing. I dont want to mess the dogs coat up , the owner sounds like she is working on the dog at home , buttttt she only wants to bring in for grooming every 2 or 3 months, I really wanted to do it for the challange, I am sure no one will pay for the time it will take for it to be financially worth while so Im definatly not doing it for the money I will certinally loose money that day if I do do it.....lol. There is apparently no one in the area who has experience doing corded dogs or if they do they are smart enough to not admit to it. he he. Any one out there live in Tampa , FL area want a new client???
                    How hard is the act of cording on your hands, I have previously had carple surgery and brushing doodles and shelties and such kills me. Will cording be simullary hard on my hands ?

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                    • #11
                      A grooming guide for corded dogs

                      I am not a professional groomer but groom my Komondor to standards that have allowed him to win frequently in AKC show rings. It is not easy and I doubt a pro groomer could generally charge enough or find clients really willing to pay for the hours of work. A good wash is about 2 hours and initial cording perhaps 8 hours. I have used groomers for additional help (one with tons of Komondor experience) and I have gladly paid people hundreds of dollars on an hourly basis for critical help. Most of what you read on this subject is nonsense and reads like people making it up. The dogs mat, you seperate the mat into cords. You typically seperate them from the skin up with a mat cutter or knife. It is very difficult if the ears or tail forms a complete "mitten". I wash with a Hydrosurge using various white dog shampoos. Some have enzymes for deep dirt, some get a better color. In addition to being white, a Komondor is by nature a dirty peasant! I use industrial Sahara type dryers. Two of them.

                      Komondors can be very strong tempered, strong willed, and powerful. If the dog decides it is done, it is done. Many do not care one bit for strangers, and the groomer may be taken for a stranger. This is one more reason you need the owner involved.

                      Here is a great book: <http://www.immerzupuli.com/Immerzu_Puli_Kennel/Grooming_Guide.html>. This should be in the library of anyone considering the job without an experienced guide.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pascok9 View Post
                        How hard is the act of cording on your hands, I have previously had carple surgery and brushing doodles and shelties and such kills me. Will cording be simullary hard on my hands ?
                        It isn't any harder than doing dematting work. Separating and splitting the cords takes times, and should be done methodically. I actually enjoyed doing it,,but it does take a long time...
                        Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                        www.ChrisSertzel.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by joeb-z View Post
                          I am not a professional groomer but groom my Komondor to standards that have allowed him to win frequently in AKC show rings.
                          Thanks for info joeb-z and welcome to the wonderful world of posting! It's always good to hear from people with experience. That's why I like this site, I always learn something.

                          What can I use (my groomer friend, actually) on a corded dog that has become moldy? The owner has let her fully corded dog get into the pool cover water a couple of times... :-(
                          "The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go." ~Dr. Seuss

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                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=What can I use (my groomer friend, actually) on a corded dog that has become moldy? The owner has let her fully corded dog get into the pool cover water a couple of times... :-([/QUOTE]

                            Mold in a corded coat is regarded as a nightmare in the Komondor community. I have powerful fans and look for low humidity days. A dehumifier in the drying room can help.

                            I hate to say I would cut the dog down and start over. It is like mildew in clothes. What would your dry cleaner do and still be safe for a dog? A good hour long soak in bleach would kill the mold but then what about your poor dog and the end quality of the coat? Theoretically you could try powerful essential oils like Niaouli oil (CamdenGrey.com) (the Eqyptians used such compounds to fight mold in mummies). I use these oils to fight mold on old leather articles for another hobby. However, the smell is overwhelming and despite being "natural" these oils are powerful chemical compounds. In the end, mold is so tough I do not know what will kill it that won't harm you or the dog.

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                            • #15
                              Starting over was pretty well all we could come up with as well. I was looking up care of dread locks, as well and really believe the best solution is to start over. My friend, who has actually groomed this dog a time or two has insisted the owner stay and work on the dog with her the last time and talking to her about home care (like keep the dog out of the pool and the importance of drying completely)

                              Sadly, the owner isn't willing to clip down and also not willing to put the time or money in to properly maintain her dog. The owner is looking for that magic pill that will put her dog in show condition without any effort and keep it looking and smelling good all the time. LOL
                              "The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go." ~Dr. Seuss

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