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  • question for windy

    I need some advice on how to deal with a couple of issues I'm having with my cav's coat. First, the hair at the crown of the head doesn't want to lay flat. It tends to have a big wave there and it makes his neck look quite chunky. He also tends to have waves down his back near his rump. The hair on his hips is thicker and tends to wave as well. I have been using a coat king to strip out these sections to help it lay flatter but is there something else I could do ? He does carry a good amount of coat but not so much as to be overwhelming.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    He's beautiful, I would love and leave him just the way he is !! You could also use thinners.

    Happy Loving your Cav

    Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

    www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com

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    • #3
      That is one beautiful dog, shepherdmom. Beautiful.
      I have two Cavaliers dripping in coat like your guy, so I know totally what you mean.
      It can be tough. Especially with Tri's because of their coat type--they are a mixed color coat, so you've got different hair structures or textures intermingling. Yadda yadda.
      So,,on mine if they are showing or going on to a class or meet, I want them looking their best--at home,,its honestly protein shampoo and let them be. Anyhow, what tools work best on a white coat, won't necessarily bring out the best in a black coat.
      When I groom them, I let the white be--just usual pin brush or comb work and a coat king to thin if necessary. And on the black hair, I put a little more work into. I will often use a stone on the top if the head to pull out those frizzies that like to catch the air and stick up reminiscent of Alfalfa from the Little Rascals. I will also use carding and a stone to pull out the fuzzies that lie along the shoulder, hip and fronts of the legs that just seem to grow that way on some of the dogs--depending on their parents and their genes. Using my breath, I will blow over the dog when I think I am finished and see if anything pops up. If I am preparing two dogs for the ring, I also wrap them in a towel tightly to set the lay of their jacket and I have learned that a Happy Hoodie sets the lay of neck nice and tight if I wrap it over the back skull, over the tops of the ears and the neck. You can make your own, but since these have come out, I own like a hundred and they are just easier to grab. Then I wrap the ears with paper towelling if I am working between two dogs, otherwise, I will always stretch dry the ears and furnishings start to finish, HV on low, Crown Royal in hand, and a pin brush, head to tail. Thinner work to shape as needed- but no bulk thinning--ever, this only makes the hair worse as it grows out, and aggressively cutting the coat only ruins its color, texture, and natural lay- but from the looks of your guy, you already aren't doing that. There are some dogs who just are curly, and after grooming, you get a window of a few hours of a great finish and then they start to curl back up. One of my best dogs and who has done well for himself in the ring, is C-U-R-L-Y. I completely stretch dry him and rely on product to help straighten him out, but it doesn't last more than a day. Here's a picture of how curly he is around the house. And ignore his ears because they had been trimmed. here is also a pic of Billie who I bred him with to try to get a bit more straight coat and head substance. And feel free to always ask me questions like these--I love to try to help!
      Attached Files
      Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
      www.ChrisSertzel.com

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      • #4
        Thanks Windy, I will definately get a stone and try that on those wispies. I haven't wanted to do too much for fear of damaging the coat but those hips drive me crazy. Like you said, he looks great after I spend the time stretch drying his coat but it doesn't last long, especially if there's any moisture in the air at all. My breeder is getting me a drying coat for Christmas so I will try that as well. I've been wanting to get some happy hoodies so now I have an extra reason

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        • #5
          Hey Windy, I know some breeders use flat irons on goldens to get that nice finish. Have you or would you ever try that on a curly Cav? For showing I mean.
          What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mylady View Post
            Hey Windy, I know some breeders use flat irons on goldens to get that nice finish. Have you or would you ever try that on a curly Cav? For showing I mean.
            No--I wouldn't personally. Some people may do that--but technically, excessively curly coats are faulted, and it is kind of dishonest....for touch ups,,yes- it'd work though. But flat ironing also can damage the coat from heat,,so even the flat iron must be of very good quality and product must always be used along with it to help prep and protect the hair follicle and shaft. AND the coat must be conditioned very well in between groomings to withstand what such heat does to hair. Basically, by adding a heating element application to the grooming, you are risking actually damaging the coat far more in the long run.
            Last edited by windywaycavaliers; 12-17-09, 07:11 AM.
            Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
            www.ChrisSertzel.com

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