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  • what do they mean

    when looking for a job in Illinois what do they mean by licensed groomer where I come from its just certified

  • #2
    They are asking for some sort of paperwork showing you have taken and passed a state approved course of some sort on dog grooming. That you didn't just learn some stuff last summer from Susie and Pat at Casa Poochie Pet Spa on Center Street in Buffalo Butt, Wyoming.

    Places around here are getting rather strict about on that score. Many advertise "certified" groomers and most of the groomers I know in this area do have a diploma or certificate of completion from an approved school or course.

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    • #3
      I prefer they just pass a drug test! If they are a good groomer, I wouldn't mind if they did not go to formal school.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Kurt99 View Post
        I prefer they just pass a drug test! If they are a good groomer, I wouldn't mind if they did not go to formal school.
        Off the record many shop owners would probably agree with you and feel the same way. But for public consumption it appears in this area it is beneficial to hawk one's groomers as having formal training in their craft. Because many shops are doing so.

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        • #5
          I find it really interesting that in all my years in this biz (more than 20), no one to my recollection in any of the salons I've worked at... has ever asked whether or not the groomers are certified or licensed. They've never even asked how long we've been grooming, where we learned or anything. The general
          public just assumes all groomers have acquired some sort of formal training and licensing.

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          • #6
            Well we've posted over 350,000 ads here since 97 and you do see people asking for licensed groomers. Over the years I have made some contact with them and usually they didn't know that groomers are not vocationally licensed, and so that should be a hint to groomers that these MAY be first time employers of groomers. Sort of a giveaway, but sometimes the business may have employed groomers before, the new "manager" in charge of hiring doesn't have previous exp hiring groomers.
            Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the Board Help Talk Forum. Thanks for coming to our community a part of PetGroomer.com https://www.petgroomer.com.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Admin View Post
              Well we've posted over 350,000 ads here since 97 and you do see people asking for licensed groomers. Over the years I have made some contact with them and usually they didn't know that groomers are not vocationally licensed, and so that should be a hint to groomers that these MAY be first time employers of groomers. Sort of a giveaway, but sometimes the business may have employed groomers before, the new "manager" in charge of hiring doesn't have previous exp hiring groomers.
              Perhaps.

              But I have checked the websites of a number of shops in my immediate area and a lot of them specifically state that all groomers working at that shop are graduates of state approved grooming schools. And I know for a fact many of the shop owners in this area are graduates of one of several grooming schools in the metro area. And a lot of groomers working for themselves also specify they have a diploma from a state-approved school. Walking into some shops the diplomas are framed and hanging right on the wall for all to see.

              Probably isn't a big thing in other areas of the country but around here the vogue is to have a proverbial sheepskin and flaunt it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Doubledogdare View Post
                Perhaps.

                But I have checked the websites of a number of shops in my immediate area and a lot of them specifically state that all groomers working at that shop are graduates of state approved grooming schools. And I know for a fact many of the shop owners in this area are graduates of one of several grooming schools in the metro area. And a lot of groomers working for themselves also specify they have a diploma from a state-approved school. Walking into some shops the diplomas are framed and hanging right on the wall for all to see.

                Probably isn't a big thing in other areas of the country but around here the vogue is to have a proverbial sheepskin and flaunt it.
                But graduating from anywhere doesn't make you 'licensed', maybe certified, but not licensed. Can you show me one state that requires a grooming license beyond a business license? I don't think one exists.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
                  But graduating from anywhere doesn't make you 'licensed', maybe certified, but not licensed. Can you show me one state that requires a grooming license beyond a business license? I don't think one exists.
                  Colorado does. No aptitude test, but in Colorado you do have to have a license to groom dogs. I don't know what they do about groomers who do house calls, as what PACFA basically does is inspect the facility (at least that is as far as my interactions with them go).


                  http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite.../1251621115803

                  PACFA gives the Colorado Department of Agriculture the statutory authority to license and inspect all pet animal care facilities. Any person who is operating a pet animal facility that engages in selling, transferring, adopting, breeding, boarding, training, grooming, sheltering or rescuing any pet animal may need to be licensed with the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by curlytails View Post
                    Colorado does. No aptitude test, but in Colorado you do have to have a license to groom dogs. I don't know what they do about groomers who do house calls, as what PACFA basically does is inspect the facility (at least that is as far as my interactions with them go).


                    http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite.../1251621115803

                    PACFA gives the Colorado Department of Agriculture the statutory authority to license and inspect all pet animal care facilities. Any person who is operating a pet animal facility that engages in selling, transferring, adopting, breeding, boarding, training, grooming, sheltering or rescuing any pet animal may need to be licensed with the Colorado Department of Agriculture.
                    That seems like it's just the facility. Does every groomer within the facility have to have a license?

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                    • #11
                      I actually checked with my state (MD) as to whether or not there was some sort of certification process I could go through (testing, whatever) to be licensed as a groomer, and there wasn't anything. Cosmetologists do have a license, and it would seem like that verbage - licensing - is what all other active professionals have to be legally able to do their craft (taxi drivers, doctors, etc) so perhaps its assumed that it's also the case for groomers. So for me, kennel license is I do any type of boarding, pet shop license if I sell toys or something, business license. and that's it.

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                      • #12
                        Plain and simple. there is NO VOCATIONAL licensing of groomers in any US state as of today. Grooming is not a "recognized" profession in the USA. Groomers may optionally choose to be certified, but that has nothing to do with licensing.
                        Most questions regarding GroomerTALK are answered in the Board Help Talk Forum. Thanks for coming to our community a part of PetGroomer.com https://www.petgroomer.com.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
                          That seems like it's just the facility. Does every groomer within the facility have to have a license?
                          yes, i am not sure about bathers. i think the fee this year was $325.

                          "License Requirements: No person shall operate a pet grooming facility unless the person
                          holds a valid license issued by the Commissioner pursuant to PACFA and Sections 2.00
                          and 3.00 of these rules and regulations. The twelve month license period shall
                          commence the first working day of March and must be renewed on or before the first
                          working day of March the following calendar year.
                          a. Independent Contractors. Any groomer licensed as an independent contractor at
                          an already licensed facility may groom as an independent contractor at up to 2
                          additional licensed facilities with the same license. On the application for
                          licensure, such groomers shall identify themselves as such and shall provide a
                          facility name and street address for each premises at which they groom pet
                          animals. "

                          http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite...&ssbinary=true

                          page 56 (if that link worked)

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                          • #14
                            Heck even "certified " is fuzzy. Anyone can apprentice someone and print off a certificate on their computer. And even if they do have a certificate from a formal school I keep in mind the school close to here that was bought by a certain lady who loved the word fabulous, I consistently met groomers who told me they paid $10,000 and didn't know how to scissor. Thankfully she left town. But it makes me cautious of accepting anything for what the paper says. It's all in the person.

                            Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ItzaClip! View Post
                              Heck even "certified " is fuzzy. Anyone can apprentice someone and print off a certificate on their computer. And even if they do have a certificate from a formal school I keep in mind the school close to here that was bought by a certain lady who loved the word fabulous, I consistently met groomers who told me they paid $10,000 and didn't know how to scissor. Thankfully she left town. But it makes me cautious of accepting anything for what the paper says. It's all in the person.

                              Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
                              Yep. Whenever we interview a groomer and they say they're "certified", it immediately brings up red flags. One groomer we were interviewing who didn't even recognize a Scottie, said she got certified thru an online school where she just had to send in a photo of her work to get her certification.

                              To be a good groomer you need a heck of a lot more than a piece of paper.

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