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Thoughts/Ideas for Skin Therapy Program?

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  • Thoughts/Ideas for Skin Therapy Program?

    I am getting into holistic sugar scrubs and the various properties to help reduce skin problems we commonly see in pets. In my research a lot of people have said that these treatments need to be done weekly to bi-weekylt o really be effective.

    A lot of my clients dont want to put out all that money weekly. Most would just shrug off the skin problems without even any vet consultation as well. But I want to help these pets without breaking my pocketbook.

    So I was trying to think of a sale strategy/program that clients would feel more inclined to like and accept, thinking they are getting a far better deal out of the sugar scrubs.

    Idea #1- For weekly clients. 4 week program. Same time, same day every week for 4 weeks.
    Small dogs normally run $20-$25 dollars for a single bath. What if I offer $90 skin program to include the bath and the specific sugar scrub for their needs? Pre-paid up front. Essentially, they are getting the weekly bath with the specific sugar scrub for only $22.50 a week.

    Idea #2- For bi-weekly clients. 6 week program. Same time every other week for 6 weeks (3 treatments worth).
    $75 for the program. With this program they are getting the bi-weekly baths with sugar scrubs at $25 each.

    Any if they need a haircut in between? Maybe add $10-$15 for that day for the cut?

    Anyone have any thoughts, ideas, or other ways I might approach this and try to sell this to the clients that really need it? Maybe the bigger the dog, the higher the base price goes in increments of $5?

    I am in no way trying to replace vet recommendations, or am I a vet, but just by doing my research on certain herbs and methods, I would like to help those who just cant afford to spend $500+ on vet bills. My roomates as a westie that he doesnt take care of, and she has yeasty skin. So she's the reason i have started this.

    Types of Scrubs I am formulating are for red skin allergies (think underside of bull breed dogs), inflamed paw pads, yeast, dry skin, flaky skin.

  • #2
    One thing that might help clients to choose to do this is educating them. Have a blog on your website connected to facebook. Make little info sheets that go home to either every client or the ones that need it. Make sure the local "natural pantry" type store or home business knows you offer this service. If you have a local holistic vet, let them know.

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    • #3
      Note: Sugar Feeds Yeast Problems

      Yeast problems are made worse by sugar. Any research you do will tell you that in order to battle a yeast problem either internal or external you must iliminate sugar. Since alot of dog's skin problems can be yeast related: I don't know that a sugar scrub would be a good idea. The best "cure" for a yeast problem is a diet change. Grain free. Most dog food has tonnes of carbs (grain) which is just a form of sugar in the gut. This puts the immune system out of balance.

      Oatmeal shampoo works well with weekly bath treatments for skin problems. I have included a lymph massage with all grooms. Lymph system can be researched on Google and then you start with small circular motions first on facial lymph, working your way down the body on the path of lymph nodes. This helps improve immune system, which helps with yeast and other skin problems.

      If you have a client who is commited to low cost solutions then weekly at 25 is a good deal. I usually do a tidy with that deal too. They have to prebook and prepay for this service. Most clients want you to deal with it with their usual appointment and don't follow through and then wonder why their dog has problems. I just do what I can for the dog when they are with me and try to educate the client.

      Don't get me wrong; I have tonnes of awsome clients who do follow through. The clients that shop-jump don't follow through. They are usually the ones with the problem dogs beit skin, behavior, health, or otherwise. Just do what you can, try to educate, and carry on. You probably aren't the first one to tell them.

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      • #4
        You could try this venture and do holistic treatments. I firmly believe that any problem the exhibits itself externally is an imbalance internally. A vet check, blood work, and good diet is the place to start. This is where i start with my clients.
        Stress is nothing more than a socially acceptable form of mental illness.- Richard Carlson

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        • #5
          another idea

          If you understand that some skin problems are breed & others or from enviroment. In the south alot of the dogs suffer from pollen. Its the same as us 2 legged with our problems. Do your research & you'll find that 80 to 90 percent of the problems come from FOOD. Supplemnts that help also healthly amount of glucosamine. When this starts working your clients will start to believe you & start spreading the word about what you have done. If you think I'm joking ask a succeful show dog person what they feed their dogs & its not any sub par foods & you'll find that this is the only major difference between any show dog & your pet. Type in whats in dog food & stay away from any main products. Go to these 2 sites to start with & see what the difference is; 1)best dog food ingredients & 2) pet food list

          If you are wondering try it fur yourself & watch the results. It may take couple months to see some results but it will.

          As for as how to get them in more often try this & do the math yourself. Get 1 customer to come in on a weekly visit for a bath & comb out with a small dog for $20 a week (if you charge $30 for the same price) you would make $50 month more off 1 customer or another way to prove this works is if you charge $50/month for a full groom your total amount for a year is only $600/yr verses $20/wk x 52 = $1040 a plus of nearly $400/yr from 1 customer. Find you common price that they will work with & go from there.

          If you have any Q&A contact me @ 864-608-1169 or pm @ [email protected]

          Just a taught

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          • #6
            I applaud your striving to learn and to take that to your clients. I think this is an excellent, plan, and ItzaClip has a great addition as well. GroomingLady is correct on some level, about the possibility of sugars feeding yeast. There are roughly 500 types of yeasts with varying environments that they call home. The problem that remains is that the yeast is "manufactured" from the inside, and it flourishes either internally or superficially, so whether we might be "feeding" it or not, more will come until the pet's inside is healed. Sometimes that happens for a pet, other times it does not, and all that we can do is to offer help for an amount of time as best we can.
            The safest thing to do is to rinse a yeasty dog with a cool vinegar rinse first. Of your choice as far as a simple rinse, or one with herbal additions per their needs. this changes skin surface pH, it rapidly breaks up oils and dead skin cells, kills off many types of yeasts and preps the skin wonderfully for a scrub to be followed by a thorough cleansing.
            Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
            www.ChrisSertzel.com

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            • #7
              Originally posted by windywaycavaliers View Post
              The safest thing to do is to rinse a yeasty dog with a cool vinegar rinse first. Of your choice as far as a simple rinse, or one with herbal additions per their needs. this changes skin surface pH, it rapidly breaks up oils and dead skin cells, kills off many types of yeasts and preps the skin wonderfully for a scrub to be followed by a thorough cleansing.
              Any specific type of vinegar you recommend?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by woofus View Post
                Any specific type of vinegar you recommend?
                Apple cider!
                Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                www.ChrisSertzel.com

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