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Need brutally honest critiques please....

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  • Need brutally honest critiques please....

    Preparing for my technicals for cetification with ISCC and need to improve my skilld and eye for grooming. Here's a Mini Schnauzer that I corrected the previous groomers pattern but still think I can make this better. Things I noticed:

    ~Legs look unfinished/choppy
    ~Underline to long in brisket/ should stop at elbow
    ~feet need to be neater
    ~Brows aren't sharply angled enough
    ~cut into colic in front assembly

    Any suggestions and ways to improve are welcome!

    https://www.facebook.com/MiltonManor...type=3&theater
    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

  • #2
    Here goes:
    Front legs should be columns and should not be leg and foot. Drop down from chest - no puffy bib- and the front legs will be fuller. Bevel the front feet and complete the column.
    Since it looks like the owner wants the dog SHORT, you can get the correct lines by shortening the back of the leg and leaving the front longer. Gives the illusion of a fuller leg but keeps the back of the leg s d 'pit' from matting as much. Also can help correct a too long/ too short dog.

    Good luck with you certification testing.

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    • #3
      I don't know your drying technique, or dog's behavior, but the "unfinished/choppy" look to the legs appears to be the result of improper drying. The legs should be dried and brushed straight down, no air-dry or kennel drying, to give a smoother appearance.

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      • #4
        The one thing that really stands out to me is the curvy underline. I know it's really normal to want to follow the natural tuckup, but here is how to stop that. After the last rib, make a snip to cut your tuck up FIRST. Then meet from the chest back to that, and from that to flow into the back leg. The area of the natural tuckup will actually end up being longer than the rest to give it the line it needs and blend into the leg. Your underline should be nearly straight across.

        I agree on the finish of the legs, looks like maybe not enough hand drying?

        Still too much bib. You should cut into the cowlick in front. Just make sure your use a blade longer.

        Make sure you separate the leg from the underline. Thinning shears work great to do that. Both in front and in back of the elbow.

        I don't know how picky your group is, but it looks like you used a 10 for the back? The group I'm almost done certifying with really doesn't want you to go shorter than a five if you use clippers.

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        • #5
          Unfortunately she was not well behaved and was kenneled dried because of the HUGE tantrum she had for the HVD or even the hand dryer. Krips, I could barley touch her with out her crying and lashing out. We did some trust building exercises and a lot of patience she did eventually settle down. All of the input has been wonderful! Hopefully she will return so I can continue not only improving my skill, but getting her more relaxed for grooming. This is NOT the dog I am using for my technicals. Just want some help for some better trained eyes to see where I need to be making some improvements. I plan on using my Mom's Cocker Spaniel which are currently 7 months old and have currently only been handstripped, and a collegue is lending me her St. Poodle which currently is shaved down to a 7 bikini clip and needs to be grown out. I hope to be ready for my technicals come Intergroom 2016, or at least that's the plan. I need everyone's help on here I can get to prepare so thank you to everyone for more or less being a mentor and helping everyone who posts to improve their skills. This forum is truly an invaluable resource.
          It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
          Henry David Thoreau

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          • #6
            I wouldn't try to get a perfect dog who needs your attention to be on the experience rather than the perfect finish. But keep posting pics for critique. I used to think I was soooo good at schnauzers abs here I had slowly creeped into front bibs cause I like longer hair on everything, once I was more familiar in the purpose of the trim ( to show athletic muscles, tight) then it was easier to keep to the standard. I have all my pictures from through the years, back from the #10 topline, skirt abs bib to #7/5 topline and tight athletic fringe.. I'm least confidant in my beards

            Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Naturally Furry....I agree with all the above posts. You've got to get rid of that Bib! (See my answer to the Welsh Terrier groom critique )
              We want terriers to visually look square. Draw a line from the withers to floor, and from the front of the chest to the back part of the leg just under the tail. All that should fit into a square box. By leaving a bib on the front you extend the visual line into a rectangle. You don't want that.
              I agree with Itzaclip, when you know WHY they are clipped the way they are it is easier to put the pattern on them. Same goes for why the skirting is set the way it is, etc. ( again...see Welsh Terrier)

              More blending on the leg hair. Blend clipper line into leg hair. You shouldn't see a visible line between the two.

              The head....way to much lower beard...half of that needs to go. (See Welsh a Terrier post). Schnauzers have a silky hair texture on their face rather then wirey, so the beard is going to hang from the corner of the eye down. You don't want to be trimming that edge of the beard. By clipping the lower jaw you will have a beard that still lays flat when the dog opens it's mouth. All the coat on the lower jaw makes the beard poof out at the corners when the dogs mouth is open, thus making the groomer think they need to trim the back edge of the beard. Let that part grow back and you will more easily achieve the rectangle head the breeds calls for.

              Can't see the eyebrows. Let's see photos of those next time.

              On another subject. Certification. You might want to rethink a Standard Poodle. That's A LOT of dog to groom when your nervous and testing. Might look for a nice large Toy or Small Mini.

              Keep posting pictures. I like that you already could see what needed improvement when you posted your photos. That is often hard for new groomers to pick up on. You're doing good!

              namaste...dogma

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Dogma! I see what your saying about the beard. I learned at a seminar once from "Mr. Terrier", his name eludes me at the moment, that with Airedales you can take the lower jaw right down to just a bit of goatee at the tip of the muzzle. Is this ok for Schnauzers? I noticed the bib too. Unfortunately that's body not fur. I think I need to grow the front legs out to give a more "flat" chest. I have the AKC 20th edition complete dog book. I'll read up more on my breeds to ensure form follows function.

                Right now the St. Poodle is the only thing I have available to me. I have a while to improve and wonderful mentors to give advice.
                It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
                Henry David Thoreau

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dogma View Post
                  Schnauzers have a silky hair texture on their face rather then wirey, so the beard is going to hang from the corner of the eye down. You don't want to be trimming that edge of the beard. By clipping the lower jaw you will have a beard that still lays flat when the dog opens it's mouth. All the coat on the lower jaw makes the beard poof out at the corners when the dogs mouth is open, thus making the groomer think they need to trim the back edge of the beard. Let that part grow back and you will more easily achieve the rectangle head the breeds calls for.
                  Thank you for this!! Beards have always been my weak point on Schnauzers, and now I finally know why.

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