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  • How many hours a day do you spend cleaning?

    Your van or trailer? You can add up cleaning in between grooms and at days end.

    Curious to hear you feedback.

    Thanks!

    UD

  • #2
    Well..........I do a quick "suck up" with my shop vac after every dog. Then I do a quick squirt of water and clean off the hair stuck to my tub's walls and drain. That's about it, especially during the winter. Now in the summer, when I'm filling up with water and the doors are open to the summer breeze, I sometimes get the urge to pull all of my shampoo bottles off the shelves and do the cleaning, plus wipe off the ceiling of the van. A lot of times, when I'm done toweling a dog, I use the damp towel on the wall behind the table for a quick wipe. When I'm washing down the outside of the van (in summer) I always wipe down the inside flooring and under carriage of the electric table. So to answer your question, I do minimal cleaning, because it doesn't need anymore than that.

    Happy keeping clean

    Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

    www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com

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    • #3
      I clean pretty much like Dolly but add a more thorough maybe once a week that includes "mopping" the floor (the great thing about my trailer being so small is that I simply spray some water on the floor and use a towel) and I disinfect the table and tub at the end of the day. Averaged out, maybe 15-20 minutes per day

      Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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      • #4
        I probably spend an hour every day cleaning and I do a deep cleaning every week in not freezing weather, where the garbage can, table, my stool, the stand dryer all get taken out of the van and every surface sprayed and/or wiped down. The walls, ceiling and floor get a thorough cleaning and disinfecting. I wash the tub mat in the washing machine at that time, clean and oil all my blades and scissors and reorganize the shelving unit. Clean the vent fans etc. I also usually drive it into the desert and blow it out (that's actually the first thing I do). In total it takes me about three hours by myself, if family helps a little over an hour. Now in the winter cleaning suffers more. I can't take being out in the freezing temps and although I can run a heater IN the van, the doors are usually open for convenience and it's just COLD so I do just what it takes to keep it looking OK. I do disinfect the tub and table daily.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Tawanda View Post
          I clean pretty much like Dolly but add a more thorough maybe once a week that includes "mopping" the floor (the great thing about my trailer being so small is that I simply spray some water on the floor and use a towel) and I disinfect the table and tub at the end of the day. Averaged out, maybe 15-20 minutes per day

          Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
          What kind of trailer do you have

          Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            I would say less than 10 minutes daily and I clean as I go along during the groom. My van although I carry a lot of dryers and clippers it is pretty spartan and easy to blow out and wipe down. I use only one shampoo, conditioner and a couple sprays. I don't carry any dog accessories or specialty shampoos. I basically use only the 5 n 1, 30, 5 and 8.5 for blades. It is very easy to maintain so few types of blades. I use a clipper vac which is a huge time saver and I cut towels and laundry by probably more than 1/2 once I started using the Absorber brand towel that somebody recommended. I keep my gas tank at 1/2 or over and always add DEF at every gas refuel. I have to tie down my stand dryer which takes a few seconds. Of course, if I groomed big shedding dogs I could see cleaning being quite a process.

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            • #7
              My groomers just tidy up each day, like wiping tub down and some wall surfaces, vac and blow out van with K9 dryer. Once per week I as owner do a top down cleaning of every surface inside the van including shelves and bottles, floor, table base, light covers, everything. Takes about 30 minutes for a full clean wipe and spray down. I also blow out and clean the back end of van and check all systems, hoses, clamps, look for anything leaking, etc.

              Also 1x week a full exterior van wash and spray wax, wheels and tires cleaned, air pressure checked, oil and clean driver cabin by blowing out loose hair and wiping floor and dash and windows.

              But some days a van may have a big hairy that trashes the van and I may follow up behind the groomer to tidy up that particular day.

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              • #8
                My gosh am I obsessive? I can do a quick clean in a half hour but no way do I get a thorough cleaning done in that short of time.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
                  My gosh am I obsessive? I can do a quick clean in a half hour but no way do I get a thorough cleaning done in that short of time.
                  Your schedule is a lot like DW's.

                  I was in a van with a old shedding dog with dandruff and it was simply unbelievable -

                  If you have exposed shelving at all or basically anything exposed - thats it, it's filled with dander.

                  I can imagine this dander cause some lung problems over time.

                  I had to be there to see it live. Reducing cleaning time is a design challenge Im working on.



                  UD

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Uncle Dave View Post
                    Your schedule is a lot like DW's.

                    I was in a van with a old shedding dog with dandruff and it was simply unbelievable -

                    If you have exposed shelving at all or basically anything exposed - thats it, it's filled with dander.

                    I can imagine this dander cause some lung problems over time.

                    I had to be there to see it live. Reducing cleaning time is a design challenge Im working on.



                    UD
                    Yea, that. My husband wonders why I freak out when he's with me and leaves the overhead cupboard doors open. Hair free zone, man, hair free zone.

                    The vent fans alone take me a half hour to clean, the build up is gross.

                    Yucky old dandery dogs are why I wear masks. I wear them religiously for every blow dry and for 80% of my grooms. Not to mention if you don't immediately rinse down a tub after you blow them out that stuff sticks. Ugh. I try to cover everything with towels when I blow dry. Even installed clips to hold a towel over the wall behind my table. It definitely helps keep things cleaner.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by herecomesthegroom View Post
                      What kind of trailer do you have

                      Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk
                      http://groomingtrailers.com/

                      Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

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                      • #12
                        If there were a way to effectively separate the tub area from the rest of the cabin the hair and dander could be contained in that area and managed with a salon style air cleaner running on 120V (you are already running the genset so running the air cleaner is covered from a power perspective )

                        This would be like a full sized version of a cat dedicated van.

                        I could effectively make everything but the roof of the room out of a single piece of fiberglass with completely rounded corners vs. edges.

                        UD

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                        • #13
                          Dave
                          Fiber glass can be funny depending on the stress points unless you intend to form the shell in place yourself. Personally I would try polymax board in the 1/16th inch thick sheets as an overlay to an already built wall. With the bottom edge sealed water tight leaving the top not so it can expand and contract at the top of the wall where you can use a weather seal under a trim to seal out moisture water from the top edge. Fiber glass also gets to be fairly thick before it gains any strength. If your really insistent on glass you may as well learn your way around carbon fiber or some version of it that you can make yourself.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Doug View Post
                            Dave
                            Fiber glass can be funny depending on the stress points unless you intend to form the shell in place yourself. Personally I would try polymax board in the 1/16th inch thick sheets as an overlay to an already built wall. With the bottom edge sealed water tight leaving the top not so it can expand and contract at the top of the wall where you can use a weather seal under a trim to seal out moisture water from the top edge. Fiber glass also gets to be fairly thick before it gains any strength. If your really insistent on glass you may as well learn your way around carbon fiber or some version of it that you can make yourself.
                            Love the material advice though Doug - Keep it coming!

                            Most likely the van will be a combo of materials some as you suggest - other parts having a mold created.
                            We really know glass, go check out our work in the boat domain www.Laveycraft.com

                            We use vacuum bag technology to suck all the resin out of the mold vs hand squeegeeing making the parts all effectively form as one piece and be as light as possible, and compared to a person walking around the loads are huge - they take slamming into waves for decades with no stress cracks. Working this way we can mold storage into the wall vs have to tack on in the outside.

                            We done many boats in carbon fibre- and that indeed allows an even thinner or even no core material to be used than balsa, but its cost per Sq, ft is ridiculous and I can see no need for that kind of strength. That said it still isn't what "real carbon fibre" is that is baked in a pressurized autoclave at high temps to allow the carbon filaments to flow and bond together.


                            UD

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