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Hair containment and cleanup...

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  • Hair containment and cleanup...

    I just started housecall, and being in AZ I'm lucky that I can do dogs outside most of the year. But what hints and tips do you have for those times when it's too hot or cold to work outside? How does one handle the hair that's going to fly, and the cleanup of all that and whatever else? I'm happy to do large dogs as well as small, and that's part of why I like working outside. I still use a wet/dry vac outside to get what I can before it wanders too far. I'm saving for a grooming trailer, so in the meantime, it's tub, table, small dryer and tools in the back of my pickup. I only have a few clients for the housecall, most of what I do is at a kennel, and I need to work my way out of there! Please Help!

  • #2
    I do all my clients indoors (although I don't do anything larger than 40 lbs). For shedding breeds, I bought a universal drain cover to catch the hair, and I try to remove as much hair as possible in the tub. For the haircut, I hang a grocery bag on my table (or near my workspace, for the ones I do on kitchen counters). I scoop the hair into it as I work so it doesn't fly around their house. Final cleanup is a breeze, since most of the hair is contained and hasn't had a chance to fly around. I don't leave a trace of my presence for my non-shedding breeds, but I do explain to the double coated breed owners that while I will try my very best to clean all the hair, it's inevitable that a little will still be floating around. They do live with said shedding dog, and they're used to the hair. I haven't had one yet who minded.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by plaidjaguar View Post
      I do all my clients indoors (although I don't do anything larger than 40 lbs). For shedding breeds, I bought a universal drain cover to catch the hair, and I try to remove as much hair as possible in the tub. For the haircut, I hang a grocery bag on my table (or near my workspace, for the ones I do on kitchen counters). I scoop the hair into it as I work so it doesn't fly around their house. Final cleanup is a breeze, since most of the hair is contained and hasn't had a chance to fly around. I don't leave a trace of my presence for my non-shedding breeds, but I do explain to the double coated breed owners that while I will try my very best to clean all the hair, it's inevitable that a little will still be floating around. They do live with said shedding dog, and they're used to the hair. I haven't had one yet who minded.
      Good tip plaid.

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