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  • So much to think about...

    I'm sorry I have soo many questions and I know you have all been in my shoes starting out.
    For those that have a converted garage salon...what do you use to heat and cool the area?
    -Did you remove the garage door and put in a window and man door or did you put a man door on the side of the garage?
    -Did you leave the floor concrete?
    -Did you put up a wall so your table is slightly hidden? (Dogs are soo distracted when someone walks in)
    -How did you section off your entree way?
    -Do you have cages or runs?
    Thank you all!

  • #2
    Haven't done it but will give some 'from the consumer side ' feedback

    Change out the garage door. I don't want it to look like I'm dropping my pet off in a garage even if I know I am.

    Concrete floors are fine if clean and even polished ( check out Home Depot ).

    Make the reception area look like one - have a desk or counter, a couple chairs for clients, put an area rug in that space ( or carpet squares that are easy to hose off ) or even paint that area of the concrete floor - anything to create the atmosphere that shows you put in effort and are concerned about details
    Select a salon theme. Are you young and cutesy or do you strive for a more sophisticated look? Artsy or Zen? Stay consistent , again attention to details.
    Separate your actual grooming area from the front. If working alone invest in a camera and an automatic front door release ( or use s sign and a bell system) and keep your front door locked when you are working on dogs out of sight of door.

    Invest in a couple cages and use them to house your canine clients.

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    • #3
      Good advice so far. In my home shop (not a garage, but a separate 12x12 building), I have a wall unit that's both heat and ac. Works well. You can separate your grooming space with something simple like a picket fence with a gate, and your counter taking up part of the space. Make part of your counter low enough that clients can place their dog on it for your evaluation. With a home shop, you won't have many people just stopping in to disturb the dogs. Make it by appt only to keep your sanity. When I had the plumbing put in, I added a toilet-don't have to go into the house if I have to 'go', and it's great for flushing down the inevitable 'poop'. I groom one at a time, but you definitely need crating areas for pets to wait for pick-up and for multiple families. Nothing worse than dogs running loose while you work.
      Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

      Groom on!!!

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      • #4
        Hello this is my first time responding to a thread I have a small converted garage salon 10 x 13. I have a wall mounted ac and dehumidifier and separate electric wall heater. You can get one unit that does it all. I was trying to save money and only purchase the heater, turns out I had to install the ac unit shortly after as it was so hot in the summer (I live in Canada and was expecting my garage to be cooler) I took out the garage door and put in french doors which brings in a lot of natural light. I used a tinted epoxy on the concrete floor with the anti slip sand in it. It is very hard to clean and will probably have to redo my floor soon after only a year. My table is not hidden and I do not have a reception area. This hasn't been a problem yet for me and I only do one dog at a time. I have one large cage and a tie to attach a leash on the floor.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jenny123 View Post
          Hello this is my first time responding to a thread I have a small converted garage salon 10 x 13. I have a wall mounted ac and dehumidifier and separate electric wall heater. You can get one unit that does it all. I was trying to save money and only purchase the heater, turns out I had to install the ac unit shortly after as it was so hot in the summer (I live in Canada and was expecting my garage to be cooler) I took out the garage door and put in french doors which brings in a lot of natural light. I used a tinted epoxy on the concrete floor with the anti slip sand in it. It is very hard to clean and will probably have to redo my floor soon after only a year. My table is not hidden and I do not have a reception area. This hasn't been a problem yet for me and I only do one dog at a time. I have one large cage and a tie to attach a leash on the floor.
          Hey do you have any pictures of your shop? Specifically the french doors you used to replace the garage door? Thanks!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 18yearslater5 View Post
            I'm sorry I have soo many questions and I know you have all been in my shoes starting out.
            For those that have a converted garage salon...what do you use to heat and cool the area?
            -Did you remove the garage door and put in a window and man door or did you put a man door on the side of the garage?
            -Did you leave the floor concrete?
            -Did you put up a wall so your table is slightly hidden? (Dogs are soo distracted when someone walks in)
            -How did you section off your entree way?
            -Do you have cages or runs?
            Thank you all!
            When I had a garage business we left our floor concrete after a thorough cleaning, and then we used concrete sealer. We use cages, no runs. We took off the garage door for a solid wall with 2 windows. We vented in heat from our regular home heater, and we put A/C in the window during the warm season. Our front counter helps divide up the entry area along with some partial wall divider we built with a gate...you can get gates at home improvement stores real easy. My table is just around the corner from the entryway wall so pets are only distracted by sound.

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