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  • Nail Grinder for Anxious Dog?


    Hi,

    We seek your advice on a nail grinder and techniques for a 65-pound dog who is very anxious about nail trims.

    Nail clippers have become too traumatic for our dog (he growls, lunges, and scares everyone), even when he is drugged and the vet or groomer does it. So, we are going to try a grinder.

    Can you recommend a particular nail grinder that might be quieter/gentler than other options?

    Also, any wisdom to pass on about nail grinding technique? I read on the forum about reinforcing calmness with treats and belly rubs. We'll try that, but not sure if that will be enough. We also noted someone recommended trimming nails right after a bath, when his nails are soft - we'll definitely try that.

    Much thanks for any advice you can give!





  • #2
    Check out https://fearfreehappyhomes.com/cours...ay-the-terror/

    You will have to set up an account, but it is free and well worth the wealth of great information. In the video you will learn counter conditioning and how to build a positive association with nail trimming.

    You may also want to consider teaching you pet how to use a scratch board. It is fun to teach and they love doing it! Check that out here...https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MKDb_M0YktI

    The key is to be patient and consistent! Training is like a rollar coaster ride. You will see growth and regression to varying degrees along the journey.

    In regards to the OP, any depth at has varying speeds. This way you can adjust the speed to the setting that they will be most accepting off. I hope this was helpful and good luck!
    It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
    Henry David Thoreau

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    • #3
      What breed of dog do you have?

      Comment


      • #4
        Much thanks, @Naturally Furry

        Very helpful!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dogma View Post
          What breed of dog do you have?
          Hi @dogma,

          He is a pit bull mix (perhaps with Weimaraner or Labrador?) - not positive because he's a rescue.

          Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            great advice gals

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Naturally Furry View Post
              Check out https://fearfreehappyhomes.com/cours...ay-the-terror/

              You will have to set up an account, but it is free and well worth the wealth of great information. In the video you will learn counter conditioning and how to build a positive association with nail trimming.

              You may also want to consider teaching you pet how to use a scratch board. It is fun to teach and they love doing it! Check that out here...https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MKDb_M0YktI

              The key is to be patient and consistent! Training is like a rollar coaster ride. You will see growth and regression to varying degrees along the journey.

              In regards to the OP, any depth at has varying speeds. This way you can adjust the speed to the setting that they will be most accepting off. I hope this was helpful and good luck!

              Comment


              • #8
                Ok Gavin. Here is my advice. I would seek out a canine behaviorist. You have a large powerful breed that is already lunging, and growling. Bites are not far behind.
                This is not a problem that is going to go away by just getting the ‘right’ nail trimmer, and a few belly rubs and treats.

                The major mistake owners make when trying to teach a new behavior is the timing of the reward.
                They do one of two things.
                1...in an effort to tell the dog ‘it’s ok’, they are actually praising the dog for the behavior that they DONT want. By talking baby talk “Its ok sweetie. I’m not going to hurt you. Just relax. No No now. Come on. Be good”....by using that sing-song baby talk, while the dog is misbehaving, what the dog hears is “That’s a good dog. I like it when you are lunging at me.” The dog hears you praising it for a behavior that you don’t want. He doesn’t understand words, just tone of voice...and that tone is most commonly used to praise for wanted behavior.

                2...timing in giving a treat as a reward, or verbal praise, is often waaaay off the mark. People either end up not rewarding at all for the correct behavior, or they totally miss that Millisecond when praise/treat would connect with the wanted behavior, thus, ending up, again, praising for a behavior you don’t want.

                This is why I’m suggesting a canine behaviorist. They can teach you how to get your praise/treats and timing correct so you can make progress.

                At this point, being able to do nails is the least of the training issue. Let’s first work on the very basics.

                A huge suggestion here now. DONT get a nail grinder yet. You can really injure a flailing dog with one of those.
                Get a vibrating device first. Some people use an electric toothbrush, others use a vibrator. (Yes,) They are safe. At this point you aren’t even going near his feet. Take your time. Think in months rather then hours. This is some major training you will need to do.
                People tend to want to rush through...”he lets me rub his back, let’s go straight to his feet!” (And this is again why I’m suggesting a behaviorist. They can help you not to rush)

                I love Naturally Furry’s statement that training is like a roller coaster. Highs and lows. You will experience lots of Highs and Lows. Be patient. Don’t rush.




                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dogma View Post
                  Ok Gavin. Here is my advice. I would seek out a canine behaviorist. You have a large powerful breed that is already lunging, and growling. Bites are not far behind.
                  This is not a problem that is going to go away by just getting the ‘right’ nail trimmer, and a few belly rubs and treats.

                  The major mistake owners make when trying to teach a new behavior is the timing of the reward.
                  They do one of two things.
                  1...in an effort to tell the dog ‘it’s ok’, they are actually praising the dog for the behavior that they DONT want. By talking baby talk “Its ok sweetie. I’m not going to hurt you. Just relax. No No now. Come on. Be good”....by using that sing-song baby talk, while the dog is misbehaving, what the dog hears is “That’s a good dog. I like it when you are lunging at me.” The dog hears you praising it for a behavior that you don’t want. He doesn’t understand words, just tone of voice...and that tone is most commonly used to praise for wanted behavior.

                  2...timing in giving a treat as a reward, or verbal praise, is often waaaay off the mark. People either end up not rewarding at all for the correct behavior, or they totally miss that Millisecond when praise/treat would connect with the wanted behavior, thus, ending up, again, praising for a behavior you don’t want.

                  This is why I’m suggesting a canine behaviorist. They can teach you how to get your praise/treats and timing correct so you can make progress.

                  At this point, being able to do nails is the least of the training issue. Let’s first work on the very basics.

                  A huge suggestion here now. DONT get a nail grinder yet. You can really injure a flailing dog with one of those.
                  Get a vibrating device first. Some people use an electric toothbrush, others use a vibrator. (Yes,) They are safe. At this point you aren’t even going near his feet. Take your time. Think in months rather then hours. This is some major training you will need to do.
                  People tend to want to rush through...”he lets me rub his back, let’s go straight to his feet!” (And this is again why I’m suggesting a behaviorist. They can help you not to rush)

                  I love Naturally Furry’s statement that training is like a roller coaster. Highs and lows. You will experience lots of Highs and Lows. Be patient. Don’t rush.



                  Thank you, thank you, @dogma!

                  We really appreciate all of the fantastic advice and wisdom. Very thankful we found this forum

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gavin....Thank You for responding to our answers. At times, the public will come on here, ask questions, which we respectfully answer, and then they never return to acknowledge that they even read our answers.

                    Thank you for being respectful.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I recommend using a variable speed dremel. I use the low settings on very anxious dogs that will tolerate the dremel.

                      Comment

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