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Stinky sour bad skin smell, hat do I use?

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  • Stinky sour bad skin smell, hat do I use?

    I have a golden that I have scheduled on friday that smells so bad she stinks up the whole van and even makes my clothes stink. She has scaly sots, greasy moist scabby spots and is basically gross all over with a sour smell , my question is what should I use on her? I have melaleuca, oatmella, tar and sulphur, and I have also heard doing a vinegar rinse may help - but would that hurt her skin? Please help! I can only use what I have on hand since i'm doing her in 2 days.

  • #2
    What do you usually use? (I. E., what hasn't worked?)
    There are 3 different kinds of people in this world: Dog people, cat people, and rational people who don't have a problem liking two things at the same time.

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    • #3
      I groom a cocker like this

      Originally posted by terrimeyers View Post
      I have a golden that I have scheduled on friday that smells so bad she stinks up the whole van and even makes my clothes stink. She has scaly sots, greasy moist scabby spots and is basically gross all over with a sour smell , my question is what should I use on her? I have melaleuca, oatmella, tar and sulphur, and I have also heard doing a vinegar rinse may help - but would that hurt her skin? Please help! I can only use what I have on hand since i'm doing her in 2 days.
      I use show seasons SOOTHE shampoo (or any chlorahexdine shampoo)and i soak her for 10 minutes and then that a soft brush and/or a flea comb and comb those spots rinse and bathe her again in the same shampoo condition well and rinse ...she takes me almost 30 minutes to bathe between all the soakings .She feels so much better after her total spa treatment .

      Her mom was so greatful she gave me extra money to buy a gallon of that shampoo

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      • #4
        The vinegar and rinse (for about 10 minutes) will certainly help the odor straight away- open sores might sting, though- so you're right to be careful. I would bathe her and rinse well after with a long cool rinse. True Tea tree shampoo is great, of course it is strong stuff so be sure to only let develop for 3-5 minutes. Oatmeal might not be strong enough to break up the oils and odor. Tar & Sulfa might work fine, but it has a scent all of its own.
        Some herbals that can also be added to your cider vinegar rinse for much added benefit:

        Burdock: great for thinning hair, dry, irritated scalp, dandruff, and seborrhea
        Calendula: conditions
        Catnip: Promotes healthy hair growth
        Chamomile: a healing and soothing herb to soften hair, soothe the scalp, lighten, condition, and stimulate growth
        Horsetail: Helps brittle hair due to its high silica content
        Lavender: useful for all hair types it stimulates hair growth, and degreases
        Marigold: lightens hair color
        Nettle: conditions, improves color and texture, helps with dandruff, irritated scalp, and dry scalp
        Parsley: enriches hair color and gives a nice luster
        Plantain: great for dry, irritated scalp, dandruff, and seborrhea
        Peppermint: stimulates the scalp
        Red Clover: good for oily hair & dandruff
        Rosemary: excellent for all hair types and problems it acts as a tonic and conditioner, one of the best herbs to use, gives luster and body, stimulates growth, helps with dandruff, and brings out dark highlights in the hair
        Sage: traditionally used to restore color to graying hair, excellent for week hair
        Saw Palmetto: good for hair thinning and hair loss
        Thyme: good for oily hair, dandruff, and mild hair loss
        Witch Hazel: leaves and bark are astringent and cleanse oily hair
        Yarrow: for oily hair
        Yucca: Navajos swear by yucca root to prevent hair loss and to cure dandruff.
        ~Yucca is wonderful stuff!
        Last edited by windywaycavaliers; 03-18-10, 08:14 AM.
        Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
        www.ChrisSertzel.com

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        • #5
          I would NOT use any oatmeal shampoo's! Being a grain, yeast and bacteria feed on it and can make the condition worse (check with Dr. Karen Becker on this). It's fine for dry skin itchy's but not for dogs with skin conditions.

          Personally, I would do a brown sugar and honey (organic) scrub before the bath. Apply the brown sugar as a paste onto warm wet hair, work it in on all bad spots and wrap with a warm (not hot) towel (where possible) and let set for 5 minutes. Follow up with either a tea tree shampoo or just a good cleaning shampoo. Then follow with a baking soda rinse (2 tablespoons in a quart of warm water), let that stand for 5 minutes or so, then rinse with cool water.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by terrimeyers View Post
            I have a golden that I have scheduled on friday that smells so bad she stinks up the whole van and even makes my clothes stink. She has scaly sots, greasy moist scabby spots and is basically gross all over with a sour smell , my question is what should I use on her? I have melaleuca, oatmella, tar and sulphur, and I have also heard doing a vinegar rinse may help - but would that hurt her skin? Please help! I can only use what I have on hand since i'm doing her in 2 days.
            If the dog's skin is covered with "moist scabby spots" which result in her being "gross all over with a sour smell...so bad she stinks up the whole van" I would only use my power of persuasion to get the owners to take her to the vet, get a diagnosis and only use what the vet gives them or what the vet says is best to use.

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            • #7
              Davis triclosan shampoo works better than anything I have ever used.

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              • #8
                I have a Springer that this post reminds me of. The vet prescribed Malacetic (sp?) and it doesn't seem to be helping... Her back legs have this yellowy scaly texture with Red raw spots under the yellow (using a flea comb after she soaks in the shampoo to remove some of the gunk)...

                I have gone through three bottles and no change...wondering what else I can try.. thought about using the Quadruped All in One (Yucca) but worried about doing it w/out knowing more.

                Oddly..Her fur grows in beautifully..she looks normal but dad gets her shaved to help with treatment...then it all shows up as a big flake-fest.

                I'd love to see if it helps.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by D'tails View Post
                  Davis triclosan shampoo works better than anything I have ever used.
                  Or the chlorhexadine shampoo by Davis . But first maybe the dog should be seen by a vet first. Find out exactly what is going on with this dog. Bad smells can come from contagious conditions too. So know what you are dealing with first. Then work with the vet and treat.

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                  • #10
                    Vet Tech Advice

                    I'm a licensed vet tech in the state of VA, and I can honestly say this is one of the most common skin issues we see. I'm telling you what it 'sounds' like, but a vet will have to diagnose it (there, a little CYA statement).

                    It sounds like Seborrhea. This is a skin condition that commonly effects Goldens, and sometimes for no reason at all (idiopathic). You'll see greasy spots, areas that have a high concentration of flakes (crusties), dry skin flakes, and/or discoloration... sometimes a combination of all these. The dog smells awful, and even after a bath it will only smell marginally better. Usually, this is accompanied by ear infections, but not always.

                    The owner should most definitely take this dog to the vet (preferrably before it sees you), because if there is an underlying cause of the symptoms, then the vet can treat the dog, and therefore, the skin condition as well. If the dog has Cushings, for example, or parasites (internal or external), malnutrition (and I mean that as feeding a food that isn't high quality, not as in starving the dog), these could be underlying causes. However, if it's idiopathic, then he needs to go on a very strict bathing regime. Depending on what the vet sees upon examination, they will decide the best choice for shampoos based on the active ingredients in the shampoo. If you start using a Chlorhexiderm (2 or 5%, it doesn't matter), yet the vet believes a tar and sulfer would be more beneficial, then you and the owner are not helping.

                    Most of these bathing prescriptions require 1-3 baths a WEEK, some even have a lotion you apply after the bath, then air dry the dog (talk about gross, but if it helps!). I'm not sure how often you do this dog, but if it's not very often, you're really just throwing money away. And remember, these medicated shampoos are not cleaners, they're prescription medication. So always use a good cleaning shampoo first (I use Griminator), then do the medicated shampoo, letting it soak on the dog for the required amount of time.

                    I'm not saying adding vinegar is bad, or adding herbs and what not is harmful (I'm just starting to look into these alternative treatments personally and have NOTHING against them), only that a vet will diagnose the condition and prescribe accordingly. And it's not like this dog simply has a little dry skin, he has a medical condition that needs to be treated, and what you do could be counterproductive to what should be done.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doubledogdare View Post
                      If the dog's skin is covered with "moist scabby spots" which result in her being "gross all over with a sour smell...so bad she stinks up the whole van" I would only use my power of persuasion to get the owners to take her to the vet, get a diagnosis and only use what the vet gives them or what the vet says is best to use.
                      I agree--Very good point- I should've said that, too!!
                      Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                      www.ChrisSertzel.com

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                      • #12
                        I am bowing out on this thread-- after reading GroomerChick's post--she says it all, excellent points and so knowledgeable- very excellent reply!!! I should have mentioned seeking a specialized Vet first & foremost and now I feel like I dropped the ball!
                        Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                        www.ChrisSertzel.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Groomerchick View Post

                          It sounds like Seborrhea. This is a skin condition that commonly effects Goldens, and sometimes for no reason at all (idiopathic). You'll see greasy spots, areas that have a high concentration of flakes (crusties), dry skin flakes, and/or discoloration... sometimes a combination of all these. The dog smells awful, and even after a bath it will only smell marginally better. Usually, this is accompanied by ear infections, but not always.
                          I have to challenge your comment about idiopathic being "for no reason at all". Idiopathic simply indicates the reason is unknown, not that there is no reason. There is always a reason, we just may not know why.

                          I agree that dogs need to visit their vet for a diagnosis. I will also say that a lot of times, it is hit or miss on treatment until you figure it out. Some vets are good at figuring out skin issues, others are awful! If after a couple tries one vet does not figure it out, I'd be seeking a different vet for a different opinion.

                          I definitely agree that no one time treatment of anything is going to solve the Golden's problem. She didn't get that way overnight, and she isn't going to cure overnight. It sounds like she may also have a pretty substantial yeast infection going on in that skin as well. Personally I would really question diet. What goes inside definitely affects the skin and coat. I'd also test this dog's thyroid, as low thyroid is an extremely common issue in Goldens, and if you have a thyroid issue, no amount of skin treatment is going to solve the problem. I'd also wonder about this dog's habits. Does she live in the pool or lake? Is she always wet?

                          As for what I would do, I'd groom the dog in Griminator, and then condition his coat and add a dab of The Stuff and make sure the dog is completely dry. I'd probably put "Peace and Kindness" on any of the actual spots, and want the dog to come in on a very regular basis (weekly). Anything more than that I would want to be sure they were working with their vet to solve the problem. One thing to remember is that many owners become complacent and simply think, "well, this is the way he is" rather than keep digging until an affective treatment is found. Keep pushing the owner to work towards a cure rather than acceptance.

                          As for the Springer, with the location on the irritation, I would seriously question if this dog may be leaking urine when she sleeps and is potentially laying in it. If leaking is the issue, there are meds that can control it. Stop the leaking and the skin will heal. If they are very sure this isn't the cause, and 3 bottles of Malacetic used on a regular basis has not solved the issue, it's time to seek a different treatment. This is another breed that would benefit from testing thyroid levels.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SwissNChow View Post
                            I have to challenge your comment about idiopathic being "for no reason at all". Idiopathic simply indicates the reason is unknown, not that there is no reason. There is always a reason, we just may not know why.
                            Agreed. Thank you for correcting my poor word choice.

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                            • #15
                              So what are you supposed to do when owner won't go to the vet and think its a waste of money? Some people you can talk to until you are blue in the face and they still won't listen. At this point all you want to do is not hurt the dog any further and maybe give it SOME relief if even for that day. I know there are many things to consider and a huge range of dis-eases, so whats a groomer supposed to do?

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