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  • Sterilizing Equipment

    Hi I had a question that hopefully someone will be able to help me with. My groomers hate sterilizing their equipment and it's a constant battle because they truly believe it degrades their blades and scissors... I know this sounds bad but I'm really doing the best I can...

    So yesterday I saw at goodwill this baby bottle steam sterilizer, and attached a photo of what it looked like. Has anyone tried using this for sterilization? My thought is there is no way for it to degrade the blades (even if it is just in their heads) and would take a huge load off my mind knowing that my groomer's blades are clean. Any thoughts?

    Thanks!
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  • #2
    Originally posted by barknfluff View Post
    Hi I had a question that hopefully someone will be able to help me with. My groomers hate sterilizing their equipment and it's a constant battle because they truly believe it degrades their blades and scissors... I know this sounds bad but I'm really doing the best I can...

    So yesterday I saw at goodwill this baby bottle steam sterilizer, and attached a photo of what it looked like. Has anyone tried using this for sterilization? My thought is there is no way for it to degrade the blades (even if it is just in their heads) and would take a huge load off my mind knowing that my groomer's blades are clean. Any thoughts?

    Thanks!
    Unless force dried and oiled immediately it WILL Degrade their tools. Buy a UV sanitizer if you are concerned but I am going to be "that person". Sanitize and STERILIZE are two different things. You want to clean and sanitize grooming equipment. NOT sterilize it.

    Also, many many of us Old timers clean at the end of the day or the end of the week or just after a bad dog. Never had an issue..... but if they are W2 employees it is your perogative to make them do it our way. Using the correct products to clean and sanitize WILL NOT degrade their tools but if you use the wrong stuff it will.
    <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Particentral View Post
      Unless force dried and oiled immediately it WILL Degrade their tools. Buy a UV sanitizer if you are concerned but I am going to be "that person". Sanitize and STERILIZE are two different things. You want to clean and sanitize grooming equipment. NOT sterilize it.

      Also, many many of us Old timers clean at the end of the day or the end of the week or just after a bad dog. Never had an issue..... but if they are W2 employees it is your perogative to make them do it our way. Using the correct products to clean and sanitize WILL NOT degrade their tools but if you use the wrong stuff it will.
      oh yeah a UV light sounds like a good idea. I will look into that. My employees are W2, and we have not had a problem either but it does get annoying the vets blaming many skin conditions on the groomer. I guess I want a way to say without a doubt that my equipment is clean. Is there a reason we do NOT want to sterilize equipment? I can see how you say the goal is to sanitize, but then you say "NOT sterilize".

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      • #4
        I'm trying to wrap my head around this post.......are you telling me that after each dog, all of the blades, that touched this dog....including the #40 under the paws, plus combs, snap on guards, and brushes, gets sanitized/sterilized ? AND....if you don't sanitize/sterilize each on of these items, including the table top, bath tub and matt, that the prevention of "spreading disease" is all for not, because if you are just cleaning the blades, each one of these items "touches" the dog too. Call me Lucky, but in almost 30 years, I've never sanitized/sterilized any of my equipment and ......again.....Lucky Me....haven't spread any flesh eating disease that's going to wipe out my client list.

        Happy being Lucky

        Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

        www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com

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        • #5
          Do they clean their blades at all, not just from any sanitation standpoint, but to get the crud and hair out of them? Like sliding apart the cutters? Leaving them with stuff in them without regular cleaning seems like another good way to shorten their viability. Would they just be laying dirty blades in a sterilizer? I reckon I'm not understanding. I guess I'm thinking about how my method of cleaning them just happens to also sanitize rather than sanitation being an extra step. I basically wash my blades.

          I sanitize my blades and equipment daily by running a hospital grade disinfectant through my recirculating bather and dumping everything in the tub with it and flushing it out. Then I force dry and oil the blades. I have many blades that are many years old without a speck of rust on them. They still look new and perform well. Heck, the recirculating bather I've been doing this to is about 15 years old and still going strong. My blades and equipment are certainly not deteriorating from daily maintenance and sanitation.

          Even if it did deteriorate equipment, that would just have to be part of the cost of doing good business because ya gotta have clean stuff. But properly done, it doesn't.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by barknfluff View Post
            oh yeah a UV light sounds like a good idea. I will look into that. My employees are W2, and we have not had a problem either but it does get annoying the vets blaming many skin conditions on the groomer. I guess I want a way to say without a doubt that my equipment is clean. Is there a reason we do NOT want to sterilize equipment? I can see how you say the goal is to sanitize, but then you say "NOT sterilize".
            They do not mean the same thing....not sure why people get them confused???

            http://groomwise.typepad.com/groomin...erilize-1.html
            <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dolly View Post
              I'm trying to wrap my head around this post.......are you telling me that after each dog, all of the blades, that touched this dog....including the #40 under the paws, plus combs, snap on guards, and brushes, gets sanitized/sterilized ? AND....if you don't sanitize/sterilize each on of these items, including the table top, bath tub and matt, that the prevention of "spreading disease" is all for not, because if you are just cleaning the blades, each one of these items "touches" the dog too. Call me Lucky, but in almost 30 years, I've never sanitized/sterilized any of my equipment and ......again.....Lucky Me....haven't spread any flesh eating disease that's going to wipe out my client list.

              Happy being Lucky

              Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

              www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com
              ME NEITHER> I do it as needed.....
              <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

              Comment


              • #8
                40 years in business. Agree with Dolly and Parti, never an issue from my or employee equipment.

                The only time I've heard of a groomer passing skin problems to other dogs was when they started using a sponge to bathe dogs. As soon as the sponge bathing stopped so did the skin problems.

                Also, if your mixing shampoos and leaving the diluted sit too long...over days...that could cause issues.

                I would talk to the vet and see what type of skin problems he's seeing. I'd also start making notes and taking photos for evidence. Are YOU noticing skin problems? Rover came in last month with healthy skin and this month with yeasty skin?

                But as far as equipment, I've never had a problem

                Comment


                • #9
                  I do it daily as part of my cleaning, and it does include tabletop, combs, brushes, and such. I also do not reuse blades between iffy skinned dogs without sanitation. Combs and scissors in Barbicide between dogs. I keep a mister bottle of alcohol for some as-needed sanitation on some things.

                  I have also never been in a head on collision, but I swear my seatbelt.

                  Seriously, though, I'm not much of a germophobe, but I do like a reasonable level of clean. I suppose people differ on what they consider reasonable cleanliness. "Never" would not cut it for me. I'm not necessarily worried about some skin eating disease that would wipe out my client list, but basic sanitation does not seem like an unreasonable thing for clients to expect. There's probably a good chance I would be just fine if I licked every straw in the trashcan of the local diner or didn't wash my hands between wiping my arse and making a sandwich, but it still seems like a pretty gross thing to do.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Particentral View Post
                    ME NEITHER> I do it as needed.....
                    Am I understanding that you sanitize your blades between dogs? From your blog:

                    In between dogs, I remove hair and spritz with my alcohol.
                    That blog post sounds like you have a pretty tight sanitation game.

                    I also keep a spray bottle of alcohol by my table for as-needed sanitation for random stuff that does not necessarily get dunked or end-of-day treatment. Like maybe spraying my actual clipper after a funky dog. Or my phone.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      How many times has a vet blamed a condition on a groomer? If it's happened more than once, I wonder if what's happening is clipper burn? Other than that, I don't know what skin condition could be caused by your groomer's clippers.
                      What skin condition did the vet blame on your groomer? Mange?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Totally Clips View Post
                        Am I understanding that you sanitize your blades between dogs? From your blog:



                        That blog post sounds like you have a pretty tight sanitation game.

                        I also keep a spray bottle of alcohol by my table for as-needed sanitation for random stuff that does not necessarily get dunked or end-of-day treatment. Like maybe spraying my actual clipper after a funky dog. Or my phone.
                        Alcohol doesnt sanitize like we think it does. Learned that after that blog was written. I clean suspect blades and actually use Peroxide cleaner. I do remove hair and other stuff, but have quit using the alchol after learning what I learned.
                        <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Totally Clips View Post
                          Am I understanding that you sanitize your blades between dogs? From your blog:



                          That blog post sounds like you have a pretty tight sanitation game.

                          I also keep a spray bottle of alcohol by my table for as-needed sanitation for random stuff that does not necessarily get dunked or end-of-day treatment. Like maybe spraying my actual clipper after a funky dog. Or my phone.

                          From the NCBI : Different countries have different disinfection protocols. Health-care facilities with limited resources may not have access to a variety of hospital disinfectants, however, alcohol and bleach are acceptable chemical disinfectants if used appropriately. As with any other disinfectants, soiled surfaces need to be cleaned with water and detergent first.

                          SO unless the article is cleaned first its a waste of time and it is not as effective as many of us (myself included) were led to believe.
                          <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I agree that it needs to be a clean surface. That's how I was taught. That's what I was wondering, if you'd changed your protocol or how you did things.

                            To be clear, I am primarily concerned with cleanliness. It's just that how I clean also sanitizes. I like that my cleaner disinfects because I don't have to take extra steps between funky dog stuff and regular dog stuff. This is most everything from blades to grooming loops (those funky throats, yuck). I am/was coming away with the impression that people aren't adequately cleaning their stuff at all. It's the way I imagine people who always reach for hand sanitizer without hardly ever washing their hands. I don't want disinfected fecal matter on my hands. I prefer it gone.

                            Anyway, I'm also wondering what the vets are saying these dogs are catching from a groom shop, especially if it's repeatedly.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sorry, I guess I should clarify... My groomers clean their blades with blade cleaner just about as often as several of you say. They just don't do it in between dogs or on a daily basis which is what I would prefer. The reason I would prefer it is because I do get several vets in my area that blame their clients' yeast infection (which is rampant in Florida) on their groomer's dirty blades. This is coming from several vets not just one. One of those vets have family that gets their dog groomed with us and he asked me one day if we are cleaning blades in between every dog because his "vet" told him we spread a skin infection to his bichon. Of course i did not argue with him but said, oh yes we have disinfectant spray that we use in between every dog. My point was I wanted something to use that would sanitize quickly and therefore I wouldn't have to lie anymore. I am blown away that you guys haven't run into that before... Or being blamed for other things like ear infections or yeasty paws... It's a constant battle but ok...

                              And yes my groomers do sanitize between excessively yeasty or gross dogs. For some reason i assumed that everyone knew it was "expected" to clean after every dog, at least by owners and vets, so maybe that's why i didn't clarify enough.

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