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Good Grief, Give Me Strength!

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  • Good Grief, Give Me Strength!

    I am about to lose it on a client. They are super nice people, love their dog, however he is having major issues and has been since they got him. They constantly ask me advice, which I give, and then they ignore it. I finally quit when they would ask, and would say, dunno, should ask the vet. I finally got them to go to a holistic vet who backed up most of what I told them, and then wow, you told us that too!

    Bottom line their dog has been in a cone for five months because of chewing his feet. This happened after his vaccinations. The holistic vet told them to titer the dog from now on (which I had also told them)The holistic vet has gone out of business, and I begged them to let me try Madra Mor Mud on the dog. I even said I would not charge them for the mud (my cost only, not for labor) unless it worked. It has. The dogs feet have gone from red and gooey to almost normal looking. Not that he isn't still itching, but we are only two weeks into treatment. I have been doing this for free. On my days off, at the end of my days, every three days so I can help this poor pup living in a cone. I mean can you imagine having an intense itch you can't scratch for five months!!!?

    So this morning I get an email that they want to go a week now to give me a break and see how he does. I politely wrote back telling them I think it's a mistake. If we weren't seeing improvement, I would possibly agree, but we are. The dog no longer has yeasty corn chip smell, feet are better, hair is growing back on his muzzle. I absolutely deferred to them in the end, but Aggghhh. Why would they want to stop when he's doing better?

    I told them they are going to have to pay for the mud if they don't want to continue or do it at intervals I recommend. I'm really rather ticked off honestly. I'm half torn about dropping them as clients because I just can't stand to see this young dog living in a cone for the rest of his life because his owners ....I don't even know what to say here.

    And before anyone wants to jump on me for diagnosing a dog, I did no such thing. I just simply said I've had good results with this on many other dogs, please please let's give it a chance.

  • #2
    Breathe. Charge them. We are here for the pets . And you are doing great. Although it is hard to not get upset with them, remember we do what we can, educate as much as we can but in the end they are not our pets. Keep doing what you can

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    • #3
      Wow! I don't even know what to say except pet owners can be a but crazy at times.
      Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

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      • #4
        The main thing is that you're making a difference in the dog's life. "Perfect is the enemy of good enough." Things aren't perfect, but they're better than they were. What you've done so far is a victory!

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        • #5
          I love the muds and they work, sorry you are going through this. But in addition I do recommend they ask their vet if it is OK to do apple cider vinegar, it helps, not a cure, but helps skin issues a lot. I know there was a thread on this last month, so true. It is great for humans too. I give a teaspoon to a tablespoon depending upon size. My dogs love it and wow it works well to moderate symptoms. My female gets the muds year round. She has always been a bit hyper mothering the rest so she is most likely to show it. I also give her a bit extra probiotics and now it is manageable. Muds, apple cider vinegar and extra probiotics is the package. I don't know the name but will check but a mild natural relaxant helps with these pets, nothing druggy or prescription the vets love to write, it can be done naturally. Hang in there C.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by blingwithfur View Post
            I love the muds and they work, sorry you are going through this. But in addition I do recommend they ask their vet if it is OK to do apple cider vinegar, it helps, not a cure, but helps skin issues a lot. I know there was a thread on this last month, so true. It is great for humans too. I give a teaspoon to a tablespoon depending upon size. My dogs love it and wow it works well to moderate symptoms. My female gets the muds year round. She has always been a bit hyper mothering the rest so she is most likely to show it. I also give her a bit extra probiotics and now it is manageable. Muds, apple cider vinegar and extra probiotics is the package. I don't know the name but will check but a mild natural relaxant helps with these pets, nothing druggy or prescription the vets love to write, it can be done naturally. Hang in there C.
            Already recommended it and the dog 'didn't like it' so they quit. Gave it to me, and my dogs love it lol! They have two bowls of water side by side and they always choose the ACV over plain.

            Their regular vet just wants to throw the dog on steroids,which will help in the short run, but it's not going to fix the problem. They are of no help otherwise.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
              Already recommended it and the dog 'didn't like it' so they quit. Gave it to me, and my dogs love it lol! They have two bowls of water side by side and they always choose the ACV over plain.

              Their regular vet just wants to throw the dog on steroids,which will help in the short run, but it's not going to fix the problem. They are of no help otherwise.
              You have done the best for the dog the owner will allow......as Moses said, it is their pet.
              Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cyn View Post
                You have done the best for the dog the owner will allow......as Moses said, it is their pet.
                Truth. But I don't have to see the dog suffer. I sent them an email and let them go

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
                  Truth. But I don't have to see the dog suffer. I sent them an email and let them go
                  True you don't have to see the dog suffer needlessly. I can totally understand why you let them go.
                  Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

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                  • #10
                    I don't blame you. You did what you could and went way above and beyond, but you don't have to provide them an audience for their freak show. It seems like their minds are made up. Here's wishing an unreachable itch upon them.

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                    • #11
                      OK, so assuming that they eliminated food allergies and environmental issues, constant licking of the feet might be a spinal issue. I have read a couple of articles about this. If it's just the front feet, it could be the neck area. This most usually is the result of using a flexi lead or playing tug of war. If it's just the rear feet, it could be the loin area of the spine. Sometimes referred to as Frisbee Back. They would need to check with a chiropractor vet.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BossaNovaGirl View Post
                        OK, so assuming that they eliminated food allergies and environmental issues, constant licking of the feet might be a spinal issue. I have read a couple of articles about this. If it's just the front feet, it could be the neck area. This most usually is the result of using a flexi lead or playing tug of war. If it's just the rear feet, it could be the loin area of the spine. Sometimes referred to as Frisbee Back. They would need to check with a chiropractor vet.
                        If the mud is clearing it up but the pred didn't it's likely mites. My guess??? They feel like they are imposing on you and don't want to do that. They think they are doing the right thing...mud could be done by the owner. It's not hard. That would do the trick and make your life easier. .
                        <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Particentral View Post
                          If the mud is clearing it up but the pred didn't it's likely mites. My guess??? They feel like they are imposing on you and don't want to do that. They think they are doing the right thing...mud could be done by the owner. It's not hard. That would do the trick and make your life easier. .
                          They actually haven't used pred since the very beginning well over a year ago and it did stop the itching. Problem is as soon as he was off the pred it came right back because the underlying issue was not addressed. That's when I convinced them to go to the holistic vet because I knew she would address diet etc. He was well under control until he got his vaccinations last November and it sent his immune system into overdrive again. These folks have done just about everything down to allergy testing (only blood which I have little faith in) and the dog is currently receiving drops for the allergies.

                          I'm 99% positive it's yeast. The dog has that funky yeasty corn chip smell and until the mud, it would come back within two days after a bath. Owner was bathing at home with an oatmeal shampoo the vet gave them twice a week. That made everything worse.

                          They won't use the mud at home. They are afraid it will clog up their drains. Just....don't ask. They are a special kind of people.

                          I at least told them before I fired them that if they aren't able to get this under control they should seek out a dermatologist and get a biopsy done for a definitive diagnosis.

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                          • #14
                            Agreeing with the mud baths, apple cider and diet but here is an interesting additional product by a vet derm. Lots to read but addresses the many reasons for allergies besides yeast issue. www.doggygoo.com and I know someone who just started it, so too soon to tell. Also good for pets like humans too who have done antibiotics and killed a lot of good flora. Uses prebiotics as well as probiotics. I know for me some basic probiotics blends are too little, or very small spectrum when a broad spectrum makes sense. Like just doing acidophilus is tiny spectrum.

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                            • #15
                              I empathize with you. I had a couple customers with horrific nails and would totally spax to try to clip them. I offered to work with the dog for free on a weekly basis to try to get him comfortable and get the quicks to recede. Started to show improvemt after a month and then she stopped coming! Now he is right back to flipping out. He is great for the entire groom till you get to his feet. I told her finally it's not worth it and to take him to the vet for nail as I will not have him hate coming to be groomed just because he hates his nails being done. I commend you on your efforts. It does feel like their are ungrateful to me when they do such things.
                              It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
                              Henry David Thoreau

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