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Corgi help please!!

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  • Corgi help please!!

    Have a client with 3 Klee Kais and 2 huskys who just added a corgi. I have de-shed the other 5 sporadically in the past since she usually has had a mobile groomer come to bathe every three weeks. She recently brought the largest of the huskys in for a bath and de-shed since the other groomer wasn't getting out the dead coat and the dog had impacted areas. I managed to get it all cleared out,without shaving anything (what she was getting told had to happen by other gpeople or era she'd asked). She was over the moon with the result and wants to re-establish a regular schedule of every three weeks for all 6!
    I have only done corgis about three or four times in the past 6 years. And those times were , frankly, disasters since I listened to the clients and shaved the dogs. The dogs looked awful, it took forever to do and the dogs were miserable. I refuse to try and shave a corgi again, besides I know better.
    This is a client I truly want since she has major connections to other well moneyed and very pet involved people. Besides that, she's just a truly nice person ( all of these pets are rescues and she's a major fundraiser for the local humane society bringing in over $300K last years through her efforts. )
    Anyhow, the corgi. Her son brought it home from college and she's adding it to her group for care. Anyone have suggestions for frequency, products, techniques etc. to help,get this guy on a proper grooming regimen.
    I was thinking of de-shed in tub, blow out and rake/card coat. Anticipate it taking the same about of time to complete as 3 regular Shih Tzus. Any thoughts and advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Originally posted by HoneyandChewiespal View Post
    Have a client with 3 Klee Kais and 2 huskys who just added a corgi. I have de-shed the other 5 sporadically in the past since she usually has had a mobile groomer come to bathe every three weeks. She recently brought the largest of the huskys in for a bath and de-shed since the other groomer wasn't getting out the dead coat and the dog had impacted areas. I managed to get it all cleared out,without shaving anything (what she was getting told had to happen by other gpeople or era she'd asked). She was over the moon with the result and wants to re-establish a regular schedule of every three weeks for all 6!
    I have only done corgis about three or four times in the past 6 years. And those times were , frankly, disasters since I listened to the clients and shaved the dogs. The dogs looked awful, it took forever to do and the dogs were miserable. I refuse to try and shave a corgi again, besides I know better.
    This is a client I truly want since she has major connections to other well moneyed and very pet involved people. Besides that, she's just a truly nice person ( all of these pets are rescues and she's a major fundraiser for the local humane society bringing in over $300K last years through her efforts. )
    Anyhow, the corgi. Her son brought it home from college and she's adding it to her group for care. Anyone have suggestions for frequency, products, techniques etc. to help,get this guy on a proper grooming regimen.
    I was thinking of de-shed in tub, blow out and rake/card coat. Anticipate it taking the same about of time to complete as 3 regular Shih Tzus. Any thoughts and advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
    I find this post interesting.

    We do Pembroke Corgi every single day. They are easily within our top five bath dog breeds. Coat maintenance is about on par with the Sibes. Similar texture, similar type of shedding. I rarely if ever have anybody requesting a haircut on one, and we have dozens, if not hundreds of PWC. Most are baths, a few get bum shaping. You'll only run into trouble if it's of the fluff variety.

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    • #3
      Not a big deal. Just bath, HV and de-shed. Shouldn't take you any longer than one Shih. I've only run into one fluffy, and she's about equivalent to doing a sheltie.

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      • #4
        Same as husky process. Pretty much same texture too, from my experience. So the same deshed.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
          Not a big deal. Just bath, HV and de-shed. Shouldn't take you any longer than one Shih. I've only run into one fluffy, and she's about equivalent to doing a sheltie.
          I agree with this. In my experience (short as it is), the first time de-shedding might take you a bit longer to get the undercoat controlled, but if you're seeing it every 3 weeks, maintenance shouldn't be a problem and a lot easier.

          And I've never heard of Corgis getting shaved. That must be misguided advice from a prior groomer. I can't tell you how many people I've had to talk out of shaving their double-coated dogs to "control shedding" because their last groomer told them that was the solution....or how many dogs I see that are bathed and dried without being brushed or de-shed, and then the problem is multiplied. Those groomers taking shortcuts make my work look like a million bucks, and why even as a brand new business, I'm already 50% booked for the year.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SandyinAnaheim View Post
            I agree with this. In my experience (short as it is), the first time de-shedding might take you a bit longer to get the undercoat controlled, but if you're seeing it every 3 weeks, maintenance shouldn't be a problem and a lot easier.

            And I've never heard of Corgis getting shaved. That must be misguided advice from a prior groomer. I can't tell you how many people I've had to talk out of shaving their double-coated dogs to "control shedding" because their last groomer told them that was the solution....or how many dogs I see that are bathed and dried without being brushed or de-shed, and then the problem is multiplied. Those groomers taking shortcuts make my work look like a million bucks, and why even as a brand new business, I'm already 50% booked for the year.
            Amen sister!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SandyinAnaheim View Post
              I agree with this. In my experience (short as it is), the first time de-shedding might take you a bit longer to get the undercoat controlled, but if you're seeing it every 3 weeks, maintenance shouldn't be a problem and a lot easier.

              And I've never heard of Corgis getting shaved. That must be misguided advice from a prior groomer. I can't tell you how many people I've had to talk out of shaving their double-coated dogs to "control shedding" because their last groomer told them that was the solution....or how many dogs I see that are bathed and dried without being brushed or de-shed, and then the problem is multiplied. Those groomers taking shortcuts make my work look like a million bucks, and why even as a brand new business, I'm already 50% booked for the year.
              ^^^exactly this^^^[emoji6]


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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              • #8
                Totally agree with the not shaving double coated dogs. I don't shave many that come through wanting their dogs stripped down to bare skin to control shedding. Some I have managed to talk out of the shaving and do a deshed, others go down the street to petco. I do have a high percentage of clients who have come to me because we're just going out that I won't strip dogs, I will rematch , will deshed, and I will try to get their coats back to decent condition. When I shaved theat first corgi I was about one month out of grooming school and didn't know any better., nor did I feel experienced enough to argue with the groomer who was "mentoring" me. Learned my lesson the hard way
                Thanks all. I figured it would be a normal deshed but thought I would ask for any experiential advice prior to jumping right in.

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                • #9
                  Thanks cockerlvr and CMF07. Honey, I failed to answer your question completely. I've followed the advice of many on this board, and from my recollection, Dolly has had the soundest advice for de-shedding protocol. If memory serves, she uses a slicker in the tub with shampoo to get out what she can, followed by using the slicker with conditioner, and then using the slicker while HVing with the condenser cone. I use the Bass medium slicker, which can be used wet or dry. Sometimes, the undercoat doesn't come out easily with either shampoo or conditioner and a slicker. If it doesn't, I don't waste time trying. While drying, I can see the condenser cone doing some of the work for me, separating the impacted coat from the existing coat, by seeing the hair fly off into the tub. It looks like spider webs coming apart, or old dull hair being separated from the shiny good hair.

                  This is the procedure I follow after having tried other methods mentioned on this forum. I then use my Andis de-shedding tool once bone dry to remove more. I have found that I cannot remove as much undercoat if they're even slightly moist, so I do as Dolly has advised and put the HV right to the skin, after having used the condenser to get the majority of water out. This method works very well for me on all double-coated dogs that I do. I also am using the Envirogroom De-Shed system, which I find more efficient than Best Shot.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Sandy.
                    Yep the steps as presented here now and in the past are great. We've gone a step beyond and start with conditioner to loosen most of the coat with the first in tub step. Shampoo afterwards and finish with HV and final brushing out. Oats are sucrtvleM and so hot without any residue. Even thick short double coats are coming out beautifully.
                    I think my original concern was regarding any specific corgi coat anomalies I should watch out for. serms that I Should just proceed as normal.

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                    • #11
                      Good advice Sandy.

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                      • #12
                        It's all been said good advice but I must say I just love grooming Corgi's.

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