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Need advice on bad bloody warts on Cocker.

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  • Need advice on bad bloody warts on Cocker.

    I have a very long term Cocker client more then 10 years. This older dog has an auto immune disease hence it has a very bad case of bloody crust warts. Large scabs cover some of them and they will constantly bleed after cleaning from the bath. I went from a 10 on the back to a 7f. I am always hitting one of the many on the muzzle or around the eyes with the blade. It's a bloody mess. She struggled with the face from day one so this process is getting worse as well as new lumps month to month. My ultimate concern with the process is that i might shave a lump the just popped up, or changed shape, off. The lump problem changes from month to month. I groom the dog in the clients home so there is no vet around. I am no spring chicken cause i started in 88. This problem has me stumped. I have concern for the well being of the dog for the grooming. I fear cutting one off so bad that i am a wreck doing her. Have any of you groomers in shop or mobile decided that because the lumpy bumpy problem was so bad and you were concerned about the welfare of the dog referred them to a vet groomer? I am slowly starting to feel that a in house vet is needed in case something happens with the groom. HELP!! Thanks.
    Stress is nothing more than a socially acceptable form of mental illness.- Richard Carlson

  • #2
    Asess the dog fully each time. Shave face before bath and thin aftwards. Use a 4 on the face, try a teddy head. Hold on to the lumps and shave around them. Use some super gentle condiconditioner on lumps prior to shampooing to soak off scabs. Do not pull them off

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    • #3
      Those are just a bunch of different things to try

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      • #4
        Personally I would stop shaving the face, just lightly skim off the long hairs. For the body I would use a clip comb instead of a blade because the comb will glide over and around the warts.

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        • #5
          I leave the coat longer by using guard combs. And then what Moses said.

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          • #6
            Yep, owner has to give up on a 'cocker cut'. Go to a two comb all over and try scissoring the face as much as possible. Sometimes you just have to do what makes the dog clean and comfortable.

            BTW a seven is a better choice on a cocker back than a ten, all the time.

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            • #7
              Completely agree with seven being better than a 10. I usually use either a #5 blade or 2 c9mb. Depends on season

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cockerlvr View Post
                Yep, owner has to give up on a 'cocker cut'. Go to a two comb all over and try scissoring the face as much as possible. Sometimes you just have to do what makes the dog clean and comfortable.

                BTW a seven is a better choice on a cocker back than a ten, all the time.
                Lots of good advice and this one barks.

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                • #9
                  Just did my moley cocker. Bravura dark purple comb. On a cv. Not one bled or got snagged

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                  • #10
                    Way to go!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Moses View Post
                      Just did my moley cocker. Bravura dark purple comb. On a cv. Not one bled or got snagged
                      Good job

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                      • #12
                        Sort of on this topic, has anyone found a good immune system booster that reduced warts?

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                        • #13
                          Natural (unprocessed) honey is said to be helpful in treating warts (both topically and as a dietary supplement). Leptospermum (kanuka or manuka) honey is the most recommended for healing. OilyVet uses essential oils to reduce size of warts. I believe it was either cinnamon or clove oil, but worth the read on her website if you are into that kind of thing. Dr. Karen Becker(a holistic vet) addresses warts on her site as well, and the connection between vaccines and papillomatosis. Otherwise I'd take a look at a dietary change, which would replace processed foods/refined sugars for more fresh foods, supplements, vitamins, etcetera. Dogs Naturally did an article on this, or you can check out Rodney Habib of Planet Paws- a nutrition blogger.

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