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Woman Says "Groomer Skinned Her Cat Alive" (pictures in article)

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  • Woman Says "Groomer Skinned Her Cat Alive" (pictures in article)

    http://www.wmtw.com/article/windham-...t-harm/8529266

    A Windham woman claims a local pet groomer "skinned her cat alive" after taking it in to remove mats from its fur.

    However the groomer is defending her work.

    Jamie Maietta said she was mortified after she saw her 12-year-old cat, Luther.

    "I took him out and I started crying. He was all bloody. He's back hind legs looked like they'd been attacked," Maetta said.

    Kelly Weymouth, owner of The Fine Feline Grooming Salon in Buxton, said Luther was in bad shape when he was brought in.

    "He looks like he went through what he went through which was me trying my best to gently remove those mats," Weymouth said.

    Weymouth said Luther's fur was knotted so tightly, it was hard for her to shave the mats out.

    "I told her beforehand that this would be irritating to his skin, but yes, I could do this," Weymouth said. "His skin though is that a 90-year-old person. Anyone in the medical field knows if you put tape on an elderly person's skin and take it off, that's enough to rip and tear skin. His skin the same if not worse, that kind of a condition and to take mats off from that is impossible without causing some type of irritation."
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  • #2
    It looks like the cat's skin has been nicked in a few places. I think the cut that is near the armpit may end up splitting open and requiring stitches, unless the cat stays very still. I've never seen blade marks like the ones on the cat's legs. They're odd, like maybe the groomer used a dull blade?
    To me it does look like the groomer does not know how to safely shave a matted cat. I hate to be judgmental, but even when I was a beginner and I groomed matted cats, they did not end up being nicked like that poor kitty. If I were the owner, I would be in shock.

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    • #3
      I have no problem being judgmental. That woman Weymouth has NO BUSINESS grooming cats. She obviously doesn't know what she's doing and certainly wasn't being very careful.

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      • #4
        That poor kitty!!
        All should been done under sedation so the skin could be stretched and medical attention for the areas that needed it (sure need some medical attention now). Having said that the owner is as much to blame as the groomer, imho, for allowing the cat to get in that bad of shape to start with. Groomer should not have attempted this without medical supervision, I don't care how good a groomer she is or what her credentials are.
        Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

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        • #5
          I once had a 19 year old cat in very very bad condition and I refused the groom and referred the client to the vet. The vet was also my vet and he called me the next day and asked it I would reconsider since they didn't want to knock out the cat but he was in reasonably good health and none of the Vet Techs wanted to do it. I ended up it, but in the Vet's office in case there were any issues and I made the cat owner sign a release acknowledging the risks involved including death and releasing me of all liability for any injury. Sadly the cat passed 3 days later. It still makes me sad to think about it.

          Scott

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          • #6
            Oh my goodness I feel horrible for this poor cat. Owner definitely shares responsibility for this situation.


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            • #7
              I've given up on referring cats to veterinary groomers, unless the cat is healthy enough to be sedated.
              I just groomed an 18 year old very matted cat skinny cat. Made it through without cutting him, though I did nick a nipple and make a very small scrape (not deep enough to penetrate beyond first layer of skin) on rear haunches. The owners had tried to cut out a mat, resulting in a very large bloody scab on the shoulder. He's such a sweet cat. I was sweating through it, so focused on not injuring him.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Emma123 View Post
                I've given up on referring cats to veterinary groomers, unless the cat is healthy enough to be sedated.
                I just groomed an 18 year old very matted cat skinny cat. Made it through without cutting him, though I did nick a nipple and make a very small scrape (not deep enough to penetrate beyond first layer of skin) on rear haunches. The owners had tried to cut out a mat, resulting in a very large bloody scab on the shoulder. He's such a sweet cat. I was sweating through it, so focused on not injuring him.
                You are a cat only groomer, I am sure your old cat looked much better.....the cat in OP was cut to pieces and appeared very scraggly.
                Thank goodness for cat only groomers.......the old ones have such thin skin, I have much respect for cat only or at least cat qualified groomers. I have shaved many matted cats in my younger years and it is not an easy thing to do without a scrape or a small nick, but I quit grooming cats yrs ago.
                Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cyn View Post
                  the cat in OP was cut to pieces and appeared very scraggly.

                  Agreed! This almost looked like a rush job. If one take the time to ensure the skin is stretched, blades are switched often to prevent overheating, and the time is taken to make sure no skin is trapped within the mat about to be clipped, this type of injury is usually avoided. It is obvious that a #10 reverse was not used. While I will always go for safety over appearance, especially on the senior cats, it is obvious that neither was done in this case.

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                  • #10
                    Looks like they used the wrong blades

                    Everyone (who doesn't know any better) insists on using 10 blades for shave downs. That's the wrong blade. Skip-tooth 3 3/4 or skip-tooth 4,5 or even a 7 would've done the job. then follow with the finishing blade.
                    Also, I don't groom cats because of their fight or flight instinct. Too much hassle. Dogs 'usually' just sit and pant.

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                    • #11
                      I've used a 10 blade on shave downs. Generally works well. There are cat groomers on this forum who are far more experienced and accomplished than I am. They use 10 blades.
                      I'm confused. If you don't groom cats, how do you know what works and doesn't work? I'm not saying a skip blade couldn't work, but I don't understand how you would know since you don't groom cats.
                      Not every cat has a fight or flight instinct. In fact, many don't fight at all, in my experience.
                      I am sure you mean well, but excuse my honesty here, what you say seems like it is not based on experience but is based on preconceptions.

                      Originally posted by JMarti521 View Post
                      Everyone (who doesn't know any better) insists on using 10 blades for shave downs. That's the wrong blade. Skip-tooth 3 3/4 or skip-tooth 4,5 or even a 7 would've done the job. then follow with the finishing blade.
                      Also, I don't groom cats because of their fight or flight instinct. Too much hassle. Dogs 'usually' just sit and pant.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JMarti521 View Post
                        Everyone (who doesn't know any better) insists on using 10 blades for shave downs. That's the wrong blade. Skip-tooth 3 3/4 or skip-tooth 4,5 or even a 7 would've done the job. then follow with the finishing blade.
                        Also, I don't groom cats because of their fight or flight instinct. Too much hassle. Dogs 'usually' just sit and pant.
                        Skip-tooth? On matted cats? I think it's a recipe for disaster.



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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ABDG View Post
                          Skip-tooth? On matted cats? I think it's a recipe for disaster.



                          Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                          Me and you both think that is a recipe for disaster!
                          Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Aristocats View Post
                            Agreed! This almost looked like a rush job. If one take the time to ensure the skin is stretched, blades are switched often to prevent overheating, and the time is taken to make sure no skin is trapped within the mat about to be clipped, this type of injury is usually avoided. It is obvious that a #10 reverse was not used. While I will always go for safety over appearance, especially on the senior cats, it is obvious that neither was done in this case.
                            I agree 1000% My first impression is that this was done in an awful hurry. It's frightening that groomers such as this one call themselves feline experts. I personally never shaved a cat until I took a hands-on workshop that taught me the RIGHT way to do it and certified me to do it. One of the first things I learned in grooming school is that cat and dog skin are NOT the same, and while shaving them may look the same, the methods are very different, and not covered at my grooming school.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cyn View Post
                              You are a cat only groomer, I am sure your old cat looked much better.....the cat in OP was cut to pieces and appeared very scraggly.
                              Thank goodness for cat only groomers.......the old ones have such thin skin, I have much respect for cat only or at least cat qualified groomers. I have shaved many matted cats in my younger years and it is not an easy thing to do without a scrape or a small nick, but I quit grooming cats yrs ago.
                              She IS a feline only groomer
                              <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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