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The Difference Between Expensive Shears and Cheaper Shears?

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  • The Difference Between Expensive Shears and Cheaper Shears?

    I'm looking to get another pair of shears especially to use on my show standard poodle pup. Most of my shears have been more in the under 150 range and have given me good results. I have my favourites of them, but all of them do a good job.
    What do you guys find is the biggest difference between the 150 and under shears and the 250 and up shears? Which is your favourite brand/shear (I'm probably looking for a 10" curved)? Why do you like the shear (feel, weight, how it cuts etc.)?

  • #2
    Originally posted by MysticRealm View Post
    I'm looking to get another pair of shears especially to use on my show standard poodle pup. Most of my shears have been more in the under 150 range and have given me good results. I have my favourites of them, but all of them do a good job.
    What do you guys find is the biggest difference between the 150 and under shears and the 250 and up shears? Which is your favourite brand/shear (I'm probably looking for a 10" curved)? Why do you like the shear (feel, weight, how it cuts etc.)?
    It's not about the COST of the shear, its the quality that matters. You also want one that fits your hand. 10 inches is a HUGE shear and the balance will likely be off. I know NO ONE that can use them properly. The reach on making them open all the way would KILL most peoples hand.

    I have a huge collection of Kenchii, but I also have a HUGE collection of Affordable Grooming Shears (that is the webstie as well) and they are REALLY REALLY nice shears, many the exact same shear other companies sell for hundreds of dollars (because they are discontinued models or over runs, etc) and he offers a 30 day return policy (minus shipping).

    The trick though is finding a shear that you can fully utilize (open all the way) without tiring your hand and stressing your joints. A ten inch shear that you can only open part of the wya without over extending your hand is a waste of shear and dangerous to your hand.
    <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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    • #3
      Thanks for the site. That's nice

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      • #4
        The blade edge makes the difference besides the metal quality. For finish work, you want a convex edge which is like a razor. Whereas a beveled edge cuts less clean, not ideal for detailed finish work.

        I like Kenchii shears and also my Sensei shears are of the highest quality.

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        • #5
          Thanks guys.
          Sorry PartiCentral I guess I should have been more clear. Obviously I know that cost is not what makes a good shear. I know that if my $100 dollar shear suddenly cost $250 it's not going to become a better shear. But generally you pay more for more quality, so my question I guess should have been "What is the difference between higher quality shears and lower quality shears (such as stays sharp longer, cuts better, feels better, etc)?
          I gotta say I love my 10" shears. When I get stuck back with my 8"s when my 10's are out getting sharpened I don't love it. But I did test my 10" shears after your comment and found that I didn't have an issue opening them using my normal range of motion.
          Thanks Irish, that's exactly what I was looking for.
          I'll look at the shears you guys suggested.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by IrishSetterTom View Post
            ...For finish work, you want a convex edge which is like a razor. Whereas a beveled edge cuts less clean, not ideal for detailed finish work. I like Kenchii shears and also my Sensei shears are of the highest quality.
            AHA! No wonder I haven't been able to get the finish I work so hard to achieve with my bevels, although my teacher can...but she has 30+ years of experience. Now I know what to shop for at Groom Expo West. Great question Mystic.

            So Tom, If I was going to buy just one convex to start, what size would you recommend? I predominantly use 8" and sometimes a 9" on poodly hair. I've watched all of Itza's videos and wondered how she was getting such smooth shaping. Other than her yeas of experience, maybe she's using convex. Thanks.

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            • #7
              Hardness rating and balance are the two main bonuses of better shears, edge retention right after. Most important is use of tools, great shears with no angle knowledge won't look as good as decent shears with impeccable shear work. I wouldn't buy any shears under $100 personally. I stay away from lines that need adjusting all the time because they skimp on that part of the shear

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              • #8
                8.5 are the best all around size.

                Go on Jeff's Northern Tails site. Lots of good info explaining shears and clipper blades.

                Check out Kenchii's site. There are even serrated convex edge shears and semi-convex which is a combo of bevel and convex.

                I have both bevels and convex and only use my "good" shears on detailed finish work, mostly on my Setters undercarriage. But for most pets on my table, I go for my bevels.

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