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  • Release Form

    I need some kind of a release form, this customer's dog has a hernia disk in his back and just had acupuncture at the Vets. but that takes care of the pain he has not the disk problem. I'm afraid that he comes in for a groom and it will put his back out again and they will say I did it and want me to pay for the operation!
    Does anyone have an idea on what a form should say?

  • #2
    Release form

    I would be afraid to groom that poor sweet, little dog. In the U.S. people can sue you for anything, even if they have signed a release form. I would think it would be safer for all if he were groomed at a veterinary hospital. Just my opinion.

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    • #3
      It took me weeks to put together an inclusive release form. Be sure your's includes something about the possibility of a professional grooming aggrivating pre-existing conditions. Note that my own release form does not have the dog owner "sign away his or her rights" (which as a pet owner I wouldn't do), but rather has the owner acknowledge the possibility of what can happen to their dog during and sometimes even after a professional groom. I have every client sign a Release Form which I keep in their file, just in case.

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      • #4
        Barkleigh has a form for senior pets, and one for "fuzzy pets". Both will give you good ideas on how to word yours so that the owner has to cover any vet expense, and also release you from liability.

        (I'm sure you know no form will cover negligence though.)

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        • #5
          It's very difficult to have someone blanketly release you from liability. As a professional, when you accept an animal into your care, you are assuming liability for the well being of the animal. And that's the way a judge will look at it. You need to have an attorney who understands the laws in your state write up a form that will give you the best protection. But even then, you could still wind up facing a law suit.

          Your best bet is to get a signed statement from the vet stating that the dog is physically able to withstand being groomed. He/she should also indicate what, if any, risks are involved, and what precautions should be taken to reduce those risks.

          It would also be a good idea to document the pets behavior at intake, during the groom, and when it's checked out to avoid claims for injuries that could happen after the pet gets home.

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          • #6
            First of, tell them to get a letter from the vet saying that it's ok for the dog to be groomed and make sure it states that the dog does have a prior back injury that can flare up at any moment. Then do as stated above. good luck
            Becky

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Helly View Post
              It's very difficult to have someone blanketly release you from liability. As a professional, when you accept an animal into your care, you are assuming liability for the well being of the animal. And that's the way a judge will look at it. You need to have an attorney who understands the laws in your state write up a form that will give you the best protection. But even then, you could still wind up facing a law suit.

              Your best bet is to get a signed statement from the vet stating that the dog is physically able to withstand being groomed. He/she should also indicate what, if any, risks are involved, and what precautions should be taken to reduce those risks.

              It would also be a good idea to document the pets behavior at intake, during the groom, and when it's checked out to avoid claims for injuries that could happen after the pet gets home.
              Helly is right AGAIN! lol You need a vets release.
              If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

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              • #8
                This customer has 8 poodles, I've been doing them for about 3yrs. they are very nice people but we have all heard that story before. I am at odds of doing this dog. Just not too sure what to do. I just thought if I had some sort of form it might make me feel better about it al.
                Thanks for your great input.

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                • #9
                  Special Needs Grooming

                  As a business person, I think that I would avoid accepting any pets for grooming services if they were in such a condition that I needed them to bring me a vets release first. I think that any pets with such special health needs would be best cared for at a vet clinic. Just my opinion.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by toomuchfunbnme View Post
                    I would be afraid to groom that poor sweet, little dog. In the U.S. people can sue you for anything, even if they have signed a release form. I would think it would be safer for all if he were groomed at a veterinary hospital. Just my opinion.
                    My feelings exactly.

                    Helly made a lot of good points too but I'm afraid I fall back on toomuchfun's advice.
                    "There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face."
                    Diane

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Pixie View Post
                      My feelings exactly.

                      Helly made a lot of good points too but I'm afraid I fall back on toomuchfun's advice.
                      I agree to a certain point. I don't like taking in new clients w/conditions like we are discussing. However, I also don't like to "pass the buck" on a client that I have groomed for a long time. I feel that our regular clients trust us, we develop a relationship w/both them and their dogs, and it is not terribly fair to send the dog elsewhere to be groomed by someone he is not familiar w/because he has developed a physical or age related ailement. JMO. I do get the owners to get a vet release though.
                      SheilaB from SC

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                      • #12
                        Something I forgot to mention. I will sometimes get the owner to stay, even if they wait in the lobby, just in case there is a problem.
                        SheilaB from SC

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                        • #13
                          I don't think I would do it. I would suggest a groomer at a Vet clinic to them.

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                          • #14
                            I'm so fortunate to have a Vet/Groomer just 10 minutes from me, plus we have a great relationship which is so valuable in this field. I would probably suggest too, that it gets groomed at the Vet - for the just in case hesitation I had when I read your thread Plexi. But then again, if you get a Vet's ok and you have a good relationship with the owner & dog I would probably be ok with grooming him too, especially if you're very upfront and informative to the owner about the risks and you have something from the Vet. It just seems all around safer and maybe less headaches for you though to give the situation over to the Vet - it's what I would do...
                            Last edited by milhasavilla; 01-11-07, 07:45 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Have you thought of referring to a compassionate mobile? I would take on this client and have the owner in the van with me while working. I don't mind doing the older/special needs pets. I have the patience for it I reckon And grooming older pets is one of the reasons I took First Aid/CPR and then became an instructor in the first place

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