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  • Shaving a double coated dog

    How many groomers shave or don't shave a double coated dog??

  • #2
    I have a few I do 1 at my salon and about 6 pack dogs for my son's grandparents. They live out in the country and acumulate burst and sticks that get imbedded in coat if I dont. Those guys also have a natural pond to dip in anytime to cool themselves. Other than that no new clients get shaved. They are offered the Tighten up or the door. Not in a mean way but I don't feel it is the best interest of the pet. After all it is my salon and from experience it causes more problems than keeping the true coat. In my opinion if they didn't want hair eveywhere then they should have picked a different breed

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    • #3
      I try not to. If someone asks me to I'll explain why it wouldn't be a good idea, but if they insist on me shaving it, I'll do it.

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      • #4
        I don't. Very few exceptions.

        I shake my head when I see dogs like the following and wonder how people can say shaving doesn't affect the coat.
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          Extremely rare now that I do and when I do they must be in very very bad condition. I get them to accept if I am going to groom them a good deshed and taking the coat shorter all over.

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          • #6
            Extremely rare - must be in bad shape. Although I gained an English Sheepdog over a year ago that is in an 1/4" length coat. I did not start this length on her...and she is a 4 wk regular.


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            • #7
              I don't, not even comb attachments, unless the coat is too far gone before its first visit to me. I've only ever had one or two clients refuse my services (alternatives offered) because of it.

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              • #8
                I don't shave and like Moo don't even like to use guard combs but will in spots. I don't try to talk customers out of it either and most of these customers go elsewhere. The way I see it is if I am going to shave then first I have to get the dog all prepped and deshedded and then I have this beautiful dog and now I am supposed to shave it which is like 2 grooms on one dog to me and nobody is going to pay double.

                I do think most coats can be rehabilitated in time though. Maybe not some coats repeatedly in a 10 but most other coats.

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                • #9
                  I don't do big dogs but have small breeds that are double coated. They came to me for clipping because they said dogs are hot or shedding. Explain them "your dog will still shed, it ruins coat etc". Most of them change to what I suggest, no clip on back but scissor skirt, legs etc. If they still want to clip or shave, I recommend somewhere else.

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                  • #10
                    We don't shave virgin coats off new clients. Now, if it was shaved previous and looks bad anyway, we do it. Why not? It will never come back again the same way.

                    We look at it this way, it's the customer's pet, not ours. They want what they want and will take their business elsewhere if we object to shaving it. Yes, we explain the downfalls of doing it, but many clients are stubborn and don't care about the coat, they just want the shedding gone from their home. Out here in the desert SW, it's very popular to shave off coats, especially in the Springtime. We call it "shavedown season". Out busiest month is May.

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                    • #11
                      I don't if I can help it--educating the owner is what I'd rather do. Once I explain double coats to most people, they usually opt for a bath/blowout/trim. Even if the coat has been shaved before, I prefer trying to blow it out first. I've only shaved a couple double coated dogs and that was due to insistent owners.


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                      • #12
                        I'm not as eager to do it as I used to be. Meaning that I would buzz down anything without much discussion just because it's a rural farm town and people mostly want short, and I used to just give 'em what they want. They don't care about maintenance, coat growth, or any of that. Even though I'd agree that a properly maintained thick coat is better protection for a dog in the elements, I don't think a densely packed, neglected mangled mess is, and if that is the alternative over buzzing, I'd rather buzz. I have never gone shorter than a 7f.

                        I don't do big hairies now, but I still have some regular Pekes and Peke mixes and similar that are trimmed short. One comes every two weeks (SS purple 4 comb) and another every month (7f), and they just want short. They don't care about shedding or coat growth or any of that. I happily oblige.

                        If I were starting over and still taking those big hairies, I would be more likely to bring up alternatives, but in all practicality, it would be unlikely to matter around here. Very few people with those types of dogs would be willing to put the time and money into maintaining that type of coat when the alternative is a Spring buzz cut.

                        Before I stopped doing bigger dogs, I had talked a couple of Husky owners into biweekly maintenance plans, and the only slightly largish hairy dog I do now is in a regularly maintained O comb trim instead of the buzz he had initially asked for. Some people do come around. I did actually initially refuse to buzz the Huskies when asked. Several years ago I would have just done it.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by IrishSetterTom View Post
                          We don't shave virgin coats off new clients. Now, if it was shaved previous and looks bad anyway, we do it. Why not? It will never come back again the same way.

                          We look at it this way, it's the customer's pet, not ours. They want what they want and will take their business elsewhere if we object to shaving it. Yes, we explain the downfalls of doing it, but many clients are stubborn and don't care about the coat, they just want the shedding gone from their home.
                          Exactly! If the new customer has a dog that is obviously been shaved before (you can tell by the coat), I'll do it. I will mention, that this kind of coat is not supposed to be shaved, just for the record, and in most cases the reply is "I know, and I don't care, I just want the hair gone".

                          Now, if it's a young dog, and owners that never had double coated dog before, I will tell them all I know about double coats, how they are designed to work, and it is a revelation for many. Most will agree to try deshed instead, with neatening the outline.


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                          • #14
                            Oh, and just to add, I currently only have one Golden and one Sheltie that get shaved in summer time. And two long haired chihs, that's it.


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                            • #15
                              Does anyone that shaves them get them to sign a release form in case issues arise with the grow out?

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