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  • Noise in a strip mall.

    Good afternoon. I have a question for those of you in a strip mall. What do you do about noise. Our shop is in a strip mall and we have been having an issue with out neighbors complaining about barking. We try to do loud dogs as quick as possible as well as move them into an area that is away from them but we need to do something. What have you done to soundproof? Tia!

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  • #2
    Soundproofing is one thing, but I think the bigger issue may be why is there so much barking? Are the dogs in an area where they can watch you, or are they crated in a lonely back room? You'll get an occasional barker, but I did those start to finish when I was in a strip mall. They aren't barking while they're on your table. Sometimes, you can cover the crate, and that will quiet a dog. Figure out why so much barking to solve the problem.
    Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

    Groom on!!!

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    • #3
      We're in a strip and have a courtyard Marriott across the rear parking area. Our boarding dogs go out n the exterior runs during the day - starting at 6 am. Day admin dogs go out as well.
      Barking means there is a 'dog issue'. One or two barks is normal and acceptable. Excessive barking is never good. It's rather a dog and stress somebody on controllable, or somebody that just needs some training. If your shop itself is calm then it has been my experience that the dogs are generally calm and quiet. If your shop is noisy and very super high energy loud – then the dogs feed on that and they are allowed to. Rather then spend money on trying to soundproof your environment I would concentrate on trying to make your environment a calm her more peaceful atmosphere. It's a lot less expensive and it makes the people, too trying to sound proof your environment I would concentrate on trying to make your environment a calm her more peaceful atmosphere. It's a lot less expensive and it makes the people calmer too

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      • #4
        The barking isn't constant and to be totally honest it's not often. Normally it's when one dog is barking it causes more dogs to bark. We just swiched into a larger space and they now can see us rather than not. Sometimes the barking is coming from New dogs, sometimes from a sibling dog who isn't being worked on and the other is. We do not keep dogs for long we try to get them in and out in a few hours.

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        • #5
          If it's only an occasional bark, maybe a nice peace offering to your neighbors would be a nice gesture-a box of chocolates or "bark" !
          Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

          Groom on!!!

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          • #6
            what kind of business around your shop?

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            • #7
              I'm looking to relocate, and since rentals are scarce in my area, we're looking at a strip mall unit. The landlord wants a soundproofing/insulated wall put on each side we have neighbors on (2 walls). We won't have an option if we decide to go this way, but better than unhappy neighbors

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              • #8
                Make sure you have full floor to roof walls!! Many don't. If you share ceiling space it's impossible to fix. Also. Double walls are the only thing that works. And it doesn't work completely
                <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                • #9
                  I am right in the middle of a strip center. I just make sure any barkers and screamers get the express treatment and go out quickly since they mostly only bark when caged. My price reflects it. As far as I know, I've had no complaints. I am pretty hardcore about making sure they go out right away, though. If someone needs all day care for their incessant screamer that can't/won't settle, I am not a good fit for them.

                  I have had pretty decent results with Happy Hoodies on some barky dogs. Some others do ok just covering the cage especially if using those pretty well contained travel kennels as opposed to the wide open wire ones. I push it against the wall, but far enough out so that it gets good air flow but no visibility, and then just cover all the other sides. Those Happy Hoodies have been well worth the (small) investment for me, though.

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                  • #10
                    I am in a professional office complex. Builder installed sound proof insulation & sound board up the walls & 1/2 way to the roof trusses. I can still hear the mumbling of our neighbors to the right when they are in their conference room . I am know they hear the squeals & barkers here. I usually don't have too much noise over here, and pretty darn lucky that I've got good neighbors. But I don't take that for granted, I bring them sweet treats a few times during the year to thank them for being nice neighbors. It goes along way!


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cmf07 View Post
                      I am in a professional office complex. Builder installed sound proof insulation & sound board up the walls & 1/2 way to the roof trusses. I can still hear the mumbling of our neighbors to the right when they are in their conference room . I am know they hear the squeals & barkers here. I usually don't have too much noise over here, and pretty darn lucky that I've got good neighbors. But I don't take that for granted, I bring them sweet treats a few times during the year to thank them for being nice neighbors. It goes along way!


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                      As a former musician I can tell you that the way it's installed as incorrect if you can hear him through it. Soundproofing has to have a gap between what's being muffled in the area that you're trying to protect. That's why there has to be a false wall. Generally speaking it's two inches between the insulation and the wall. If it's right on the wall it's not going to do any good. A lot of people don't understand that.
                      <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Particentral View Post
                        As a former musician I can tell you that the way it's installed as incorrect if you can hear him through it. Soundproofing has to have a gap between what's being muffled in the area that you're trying to protect. That's why there has to be a false wall. Generally speaking it's two inches between the insulation and the wall. If it's right on the wall it's not going to do any good. A lot of people don't understand that.
                        You are absolutely correct Parti, plus the walls needed to go to the roof - we all hv dropped ceilings. Since it is just me, I do not too much barking or noise. Plus they cannot hear my dryers or clippers.


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                        • #13
                          Lol, this guy. I just remembered a screamer I go through stupid lengths to keep quiet when he can't go home right away, but it's such a part of my routine and seriously not as PITA as it's going to sound, I'd forgotten about him.

                          This guy. Perfect on the table, but kenneling freaks him out and makes him thrash and flail and throw himself around. And OMG the ear piercing shrieks. After two years of attempted conditioning, he just isn't having it. Happy Hoodies, cage covering, he's not buying any of that. Sometimes it's just about getting stuff done, you know? Whatever works.

                          Since he is perfectly comfortable on the table and small enough not to risk flipping a table, that's where I leave him if he isn't able to leave right away. My tables are portable, so I just set him up on a spare table with front and rear harnesses so that he can't leap off, and keep him within arm's reach. He can sit, but he is unable to jump, or if he did, he would just trapeze out and back again. I keep him on that table right by me as I do other work. If I have to potty, I take him with me. Otherwise I just drag him on that table around with me.

                          May or may not be relevant, but it is another tool in my anti barking arsenal for the otherwise exceptionally well behaved.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Particentral View Post
                            As a former musician I can tell you that the way it's installed as incorrect if you can hear him through it. Soundproofing has to have a gap between what's being muffled in the area that you're trying to protect. That's why there has to be a false wall. Generally speaking it's two inches between the insulation and the wall. If it's right on the wall it's not going to do any good. A lot of people don't understand that.
                            I agree with the gap beyond just putting sound tiles.

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                            • #15
                              If you are ever looking for a strip mall I worked in one that was the end unit so we only shared 1 wall, and it was single story. Lots less concern.

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