Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

So, about reverse shaving....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • So, about reverse shaving....

    I read the other reverse shaving thread over the weekend - brand new data to this newbie. I started a new thread so this wouldn't get swallowed up by that thread. So my first sweetie today was a very dancy Yorkie. In my extremely short experience, this thin flat coat has been difficult to get smoothly finished and I am graded on this. So I thought, what the heck, I'll try a 5 reverse on a 7 all over, what's the worst that can happen? I'll be damned. It came out beautiful, smooth and velvety. Even my teacher was impressed.

    Then my second darling was an older Golden with thinning hair, also a 7 A/O. The 5 reverse wouldn't go through her hair. I had to use the 7 first, then I used the 5 in reverse to smooth it out and she came out beautiful!

    I'm so glad I read this board!!!

    Any thoughts on why the 5 reverse wouldn't work on my Goldie the first go round? I'd like to understand the whys of how things work, if anyone has any insight/experience. Thanks.

  • #2
    I'm still trying to comprehend why owners would want their Golden and Yorkie shaved down with a #7...............here's hoping that most pets coming thru your salon/school will allow you to practice some scissor work.

    Happy impressing your teacher

    Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

    www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a handful of clients (mostly yorkies) that I do a 5 or 4 reverse. they have weird coats and the finish is nicer, however I don't like to reverse shave bc it's a lot easier to knick the dog. In fact, a couple of these, I've just started to use a 10 and it looks the same. Around here, shorter is better. Glad you learned something new. I agree with Dolly, hopefully you get to do more scissor work!

      Comment


      • #4
        When you clip against the grain, your blade is positioned underneath the lie of the coat and lifts the hair as you are clipping it off. There could be a couple of reasons your #5FC couldn't do this. One would be that the undercoat of your Golden, a double coated breed, had not been brushed out when it shed. This unbrushed dead hair will stay trapped under the topcoat and create a very dense layer (wadding) . This would be difficult for your blade to lift and clip in reverse until you removed some packed in hair with the grain first. If your Golden didn't have a full topcoat, because it's usually clipped, the #5FC may not have been effective initially because clipping a double coat down creates the two coats ( top and under) to be the same length. This creates an increase in the coats density until the topcoat regrows. This dense coat may have been too plush for your blade to lift and clip in reverse initially.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by wild4westies View Post
          When you clip against the grain, your blade is positioned underneath the lie of the coat and lifts the hair as you are clipping it off. There could be a couple of reasons your #5FC couldn't do this. One would be that the undercoat of your Golden, a double coated breed, had not been brushed out when it shed. This unbrushed dead hair will stay trapped under the topcoat and create a very dense layer (wadding) . This would be difficult for your blade to lift and clip in reverse until you removed some packed in hair with the grain first. If your Golden didn't have a full topcoat, because it's usually clipped, the #5FC may not have been effective initially because clipping a double coat down creates the two coats ( top and under) to be the same length. This creates an increase in the coats density until the topcoat regrows. This dense coat may have been too plush for your blade to lift and clip in reverse initially.
          That makes perfect sense W4W. I actually recognized the undercoat issue, not as detailed as you explained it of course, but when my blade wouldn't go through, I tried to brush her hair with my pin brush, which made no difference, and then with a soft slicker, which made no difference either. Not her whole coat, just one of the dense areas to see if it made a difference getting the blade though it. Her top coat was thinning and her undercoat was dense and woolly, so I ended up using the 7, which was fine, but ended up with the usual track marks. The 5 in reverse erased those in the end.

          I am happy to have learned a new technique, and happy to have learned that it works better for certain coat types - not all. I could read about details like these all day (and I do read a lot), but until I experience it first hand, it doesn't sink in nearly as well for me.

          I am about 5 weeks in to my training, and have become far more adept with my clippers for someone who had never even held a clipper before starting. And I AM scissoring feet, heads and some tails, I have to do it to all of my assigned dogs. At first the teacher would demo on half the head and I would do the other, but now I do them all myself. I find that between the videos I watch and the 2 teachers demonstrating, they all do it so differently that I am not catching on to certain aspects of the "teddy bear head", which is about 90% of what comes in. Being that I'm from the legal field and have had little exposure to artistic expressions, I tend towards being analytical and my learning style is mechanical, i,e., Step 1 is: Step 2 is:... I have to learn one way, and then when I get comfortable with that, I can experiment with other ways of doing things.

          I had my first technical test last week, Clippering, on a Maltese no less, I left the top of the head 1/4" too long and the feet not tight enough. I wish I would have known about the reverse shaving for that!! But I think the faults I just mentioned are sort of subjective. The Maltese looked good when I finished her and to me her head and feet were in balance with the 5 A/O body cut. TO ME....not to the teacher.

          My next technical will be Scissoring and then I will learn to set patterns. So I am scissoring, especially legs, as I have had LOTS of wiggly dancy dogs who twist their feet away from the clippers. I've been thinking that maybe my Andis Excel vibrates a lot, it seems to more than the Bravura the teacher has, and that bothers the dogs more? But more than likely it is my lack of experience.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SandyinAnaheim View Post

            Then my second darling was an older Golden with thinning hair, also a 7 A/O. The 5 reverse wouldn't go through her hair. I had to use the 7 first, then I used the 5 in reverse to smooth it out and she came out beautiful!

            I'm so glad I read this board!!!

            Any thoughts on why the 5 reverse wouldn't work on my Goldie the first go round? I'd like to understand the whys of how things work, if anyone has any insight/experience. Thanks.
            You can also use reverse with combs as well. Just remember to go 2 lengths or so longer than the comb. So if you use a 1 Comb you can reverse it with a A comb. I have shaved a few Goldens and Labs down. Not my favorite thing to do.. but if people want it... I shall give it! I love doing a 5 reverse on a lab. Hahaha.. a couple of years ago, I went back to grooming school.. and this other gal and I would tag team, I guess that's the term lol.. anyway.. if a lab or Golden came along that needed shaving.. she'd take one side, and I'd take the other side.. and we'd get that dog done in no time.
            Debbie
            There's always room for another rose in the garden.

            Comment


            • #7
              Something else that can cause a blade to catch on a double coated dog is an undercoat that's still slightly damp close to the skin. It will go through more smoothly if the coat is well and truly dry.

              Yorkies getting short all-one-length styles seem to be particularly well suited to reverse comb clipping. I do a lot of them with #1, #2, or #4 SS combs, depending on how close the owner wants me to get to a shaved look. I don't like using the method on dogs with limp, Maltese type coats, though. The yorkie coat usually has enough body to it that it will stand up to a reversed blade or comb, but too often a Maltese coat will flatten backwards. In my hands the finish is better if I follow the grain.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by rosyone View Post
                Something else that can cause a blade to catch on a double coated dog is an undercoat that's still slightly damp close to the skin. It will go through more smoothly if the coat is well and truly dry.
                I think this might have been one of the problems actually. I was told to bathe and HV dry the Goldie and then get on to de-shedding her brother, an Australian Cattle Dog, while Goldie finishes drying with a cage dryer. The cage dryers they use are seriously underpowered and ineffective, they're like a hand-held fan. So even though it took just under an hour to HV de-shed twice in the tub and then HV dry the Aussie, certain areas of Goldie weren't dry, like her inner thighs and hair under her ears. So a moist densely packed undercoat is the likely culprit of why my blade wouldn't even budge through her coat, now that I look back on it. Thanks for the insights.

                Comment

                Working...
                X