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I am so tired of seeing these 4 week grooming schools!

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  • I am so tired of seeing these 4 week grooming schools!

    Ok, so mostly because I get applicants and they are glorified bathers. Come on people take a longer class, it will be so beneficial to you! Even worse is seeing 4 week programs and it being part time. If you are interested in becoming a dog groomer, take the leap! But please find a good school- Do whatever you need to do to attend for at least 200 hours. Pay attention to everything they say and soak up all that information. Make sure they can provide you with a wide range of dogs and not just shave downs and not just poodles from the owners breeding program! Don't have the money for a longer class or did you fall in love with a school two states away? Get a personal loan, its so inexpensive for school and you get to go right out and probably be hired in a week. You can't say that about most degrees. The industry needs more good groomers.

  • #2
    There is a grooming school in Ohio that costs $2875.00 for 80 hrs........that's 2 week folks !! In those 2 weeks, you are suppose to learn all of the different breed grooms, bathing techniques and use of equipment. They break down the hours: 16 hrs of theory and 64 hrs of hands on. They advertise that they have been open for 35 years.

    Happy smelling a rip off

    Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

    www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com

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    • #3
      In defense, since there's no grooming licensing by states, a school can make up any length program they want. In 80 hours, an individual can learn BASIC grooming skills and animal safety skills. After that, it's up to that individual to pursue further education and mentoring and get a job as a bather. It's more of a introduction to grooming. It's misleading if the school claims you will be a full finish groomer and can do all breeds and styles.

      Lots of groomers learned by a family member and hands-on, no school. My daughter is 4 and like a dental assistant, can anticipate what tools and chemicals I need and hands them to me, knows how to brush and helps bathe when she's with us in my shop. Can you imagine her skill level by 12 yrs old if she continues watching and learning? No grooming school necessary.

      I agree, 80 hours is not nearly enough. I did 1800 cosmetology hours to get a license.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dolly View Post
        There is a grooming school in Ohio that costs $2875.00 for 80 hrs........that's 2 week folks !! In those 2 weeks, you are suppose to learn all of the different breed grooms, bathing techniques and use of equipment. They break down the hours: 16 hrs of theory and 64 hrs of hands on. They advertise that they have been open for 35 years.

        Happy smelling a rip off

        Dolly's Barking Bubbles, LLC

        www.dollysbarkingbubbles.com
        Wow, that's expensive, for only 80 hours. The one I went to was 16 weeks, and was just below $6,000.
        I just can't imagine learning enough in 64 hours of "hands-on", just imagine how long does it take a newbie to groom a dog start to finish, say, 3-4 hours? That means there will only be enough time for 16-21 dogs. Maybe enough for a starting point, but not for opening your own business upon graduation.

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        • #5
          I feel the same way. But the student or potential groomer is led to believe this is the normal course of study and will find work right after schooling. This is why school needs regulated with standards and a required amount of hours. They should also not be able to use the term certified. It is very misleading if not deceitful to students. They are sent out to find a job and can't understand why no one will hire them since they are "certified". Yes I do think potential groomers should do more research on the school they choose but the schools need oversight to and more regulations. People are take. Advantage of and taken for $$ all the time. I feel sorry for the students, well sort of. To think after 2 weeks you are certified and can go get a job and make tons of $$ or open your open your own salon is quite naive on the students part.

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          • #6
            Problem is anyone can with zero experience, build a quick home built van, slap a name on it, get a business license very easily and advertise on CL and be out grooming LEGALLY. I actually know someone with 6 months experience watching a groomer and then went out on their own van and 2 yrs later have a steady client base. All they did was shadow a groomer 6 months and learned from there.

            I can assess whether a person has natural hair cutting skill either dog or human very quickly. Some have natural talent and can easily pick it up. Others can try and try and it's like they have 2 left hands. Cannot see symmetry and balance at all.

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            • #7
              Shadowing a groomer does not necessarily complete training that could be achieved in school. Many groomers without formal training have weak skin and coat knowledge, just one example. Also, how can they be any better than the one they shadow, lots of recycled nonsense in groomers I know that trained under another groomer unless they did extensive continuing education.

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              • #8
                I think we should be more supportive of people's choices. Some have no other avenue that works with their life choices. I for one choose an online school because that's the way it had to be, no other option. Mentors an be wonderful people and I'm looking forward to meeting my mentors of 40 and 20 years. I will not be as good as they are, or someone with comparable experience. But I will make a difference in the lives of many pets and that is an accomplishment I will be proud of.

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                • #9
                  Most schools cannot get students to go much more than 300 hours today from what I hear. Continuing education is more important than ever.

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                  • #10
                    The school I am attending requires 480 hrs and I think that is not enough, I would prefer 600 hrs.

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                    • #11
                      Isn't that the length of the school of the retail pet supply chains?

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                      • #12
                        Most schools used to be 500 to 600 but very few students are willing to go that long unless they school loans. We have surveyed perhaps 25,000 career seekers minimum, and majority wanted 400 or less hours. But you are right 600 is the standard that Melissa Verplank chose for Paragon. If you listened to the GroomerTALK Radio Show with Greg Docktor of Merryfield School, they are 600 hours but students that need more hours can get 900 hours at no additional charge.

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                        • #13
                          I paid ~$6,000 for a 420 hour program. Best thing I could have ever done

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                          • #14
                            How big are classes at Merryfield and paragon?

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                            • #15
                              Way back when, I paid around $5000 for a full time course that was 16 weeks and 692 hours of training. Worth every penny, but not everyone can take that chunk of time off from making a living and paying bills. Especially working/learning grooming students that have a child to support. I think whether you learn for 4 weeks or 4 months, the important thing is to continue to learn and improve at your craft. Buy books and DVD's, hang out in the grooming tents at dog shows, ask a mentor for tips. I was just chatting with Jodi Murphy at Atlanta Pet Fair where she reminded me that she is a self-taught groomer. Certainly her accomplishments have been monumental, and that's because she sought out knowledge and didn't pay attention to the nay sayers.

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