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  • Sharing fears as a groomer

    I like the threads of late where some of you are sharing your fears. There was black nails, poodle foot, backup van or trailer.

    OK mine was my first salary employee. You know, slow or busy you guarantee the salary for a great groomer. That was really really scary but it made me learn more about running a business. I bought from problems to profits, called the author, this was 10 years ago, took a class and was always thinking of ways to stay busy. We did OK and I love hourly and salary only.

    What fears did you get over? I think many readers here will learn from us.

  • #2
    I think I'm most afraid of someone crashing my van too and lose all my tools/ equipment and not being able to work for days or week.
    Or screw up on my appointment book and go to the wrong client or give away someone's appointment without noticing, I did once because the client said the appointment was too late for him, but I thought he wouldn't wait and go somewhere else but the day of the appointment he called to confirm. The fact he wasn't sure about the appointment means I'm not the only one who misunderstood.
    I'm also afraid of sentences like "he's not a gentle dog, he bites me when I try to brush him" or those, they really want me to not take that little monster as a client.

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    • #3
      I think my worst fear is that I won't become the caliper groomer that I want to be. I would love to offer clients show trims and groom dogs preparing for a show. I want to be "that " groomer that's all the buzz in the neighborhood. I know it will be a long road and a lot of hard work and an entire life of learning. As discussed in some previous threads though, i do believe that this profession just comes natural to some people and they just are naturally gifted while others work very hard but never seem to quite get it. I fear I will be the latter. I guess only time will tell and till then I just keep pushing forward.
      It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
      Henry David Thoreau

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Naturally Furry View Post
        I think my worst fear is that I won't become the caliper groomer that I want to be. I would love to offer clients show trims and groom dogs preparing for a show. I want to be "that " groomer that's all the buzz in the neighborhood. I know it will be a long road and a lot of hard work and an entire life of learning. As discussed in some previous threads though, i do believe that this profession just comes natural to some people and they just are naturally gifted while others work very hard but never seem to quite get it. I fear I will be the latter. I guess only time will tell and till then I just keep pushing forward.
        ?
        I Resonate with this but I'm realizing I'm totally capable when not rushed, but no one (That i've seen) wants to pay for the show quality grooms. they want show quality with none of the upkeep and a fraction of the cost. Take Pictures of your best work and keep them on hand. the important part is the dog feels good and is healthy. vanity comes to those who are willing to pay and work for it (on the customers side) Learning is my favorite part, but some teachers plain suck! (the know it alls who comment on your work yet put out lesser value themselves) Grooming isnt defined in making the dog look cute. its about health.. as long as you're doing your best i don't see an issue. I always give a better groom than what the customer pays for but if theyre expecting a high yeild for a little investment- (show quality for a basic price) they get what they get.

        Also if the customer deviates from the standard cut its totally up to the stylist, its art. can you compare a picasso to a rembrant? youll have mixed reviews on either sides...

        the only thing in grooming i really fear is the employers. everything else can be reasoned with but bad shop owners hurt the industry more than anything IMO

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        • #5
          Since becoming a groomer, I am more aware of my own health and well-being. My biggest worry is a non-grooming injury i.e. twisting an ankle, hurting my wrists or hands and etc. It's just me, so if I cannot work my shop is closed. That scares me especially if I would need any type of surgery & could not work for several weeks.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DogGamut View Post
            ?
            I Resonate with this but I'm realizing I'm totally capable when not rushed, but no one (That i've seen) wants to pay for the show quality grooms. they want show quality with none of the upkeep and a fraction of the cost. Take Pictures of your best work and keep them on hand. the important part is the dog feels good and is healthy. vanity comes to those who are willing to pay and work for it (on the customers side) Learning is my favorite part, but some teachers plain suck! (the know it alls who comment on your work yet put out lesser value themselves) Grooming isnt defined in making the dog look cute. its about health.. as long as you're doing your best i don't see an issue. I always give a better groom than what the customer pays for but if theyre expecting a high yeild for a little investment- (show quality for a basic price) they get what they get.

            Also if the customer deviates from the standard cut its totally up to the stylist, its art. can you compare a picasso to a rembrant? youll have mixed reviews on either sides...

            the only thing in grooming i really fear is the employers. everything else can be reasoned with but bad shop owners hurt the industry more than anything IMO
            Thanks for all the input but I think I may have not been clear. I would like to eventually groom actually show dogs, not just a pet in a show cut. I had a lady calling the other day that needed her Lakeland stripped for show and was looking for a closer groomer than her breeder/handler was to her. I explained we offer "pet" hand stripping and unfortunately could not be able to help her. That's one of my dreams is to be a show groomer.
            It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
            Henry David Thoreau

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            • #7
              Yep I shared mine about mobile things. I know the poodle feet thing and blacks nails when you first learn. I do have a fear of Akitas and Chows but much less. I now interview the dog and owner first and make a decision.

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              • #8
                I never liked the feeling of having to call a customer and say we need to take the coat off due to our not doing a good pre-inspection.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cmf07 View Post
                  Since becoming a groomer, I am more aware of my own health and well-being. My biggest worry is a non-grooming injury i.e. twisting an ankle, hurting my wrists or hands and etc. It's just me, so if I cannot work my shop is closed. That scares me especially if I would need any type of surgery & could not work for several weeks.


                  Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                  Yep, this is a worry for me as I am the only wage earner. However, I have had a broken foot, broken ankle, 7 stitches in my left palm, cancer surgery. .......although I have never had to close for more than a week (I WILL WORK HURT), you put money back for these times, or buy insurance like Aflac.
                  Last edited by Cyn; 11-17-15, 05:09 PM.
                  Ain't always easy to stand up for what is right.

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                  • #10
                    Thank you for sharing your stories. I think it helps the groomers who are single and intend to go it alone self employed. You really take on a lot when not an employee and running your own business. It can seem fearful and you just have to know I can do it, and do it. Very different than being an employee. I think I have some happy employees who tend to stay because they know for sure they don't the fears of being self employed and like having a good boss, which I strive to be and get them over any fears of grooming.

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                    • #11
                      Injuring a dog in any way, shape, or form.

                      I also worry about the quality of work I am doing. I grew up showing dogs and I still show my guys in conformation. I love watching my friends at shows preparing their hand stripped or perfectly scissored breeds. Then the next day I'm at work trying to hide severe bow legs on an ugly Shih Tzu... Ya know what I mean?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Nitewalk View Post
                        Injuring a dog in any way, shape, or form.

                        I also worry about the quality of work I am doing. I grew up showing dogs and I still show my guys in conformation. I love watching my friends at shows preparing their hand stripped or perfectly scissored breeds. Then the next day I'm at work trying to hide severe bow legs on an ugly Shih Tzu... Ya know what I mean?
                        Uh huh, I know what ya mean Nitewalk! I know.
                        It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see.
                        Henry David Thoreau

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                        • #13
                          I found most of my fears were pleasing my family who thought I should finish college, get a degree. In the end they see how happy I am and bring it on, face the fear get over it. Most are somebody elses.

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                          • #14
                            Never thought about that Tootsie, deep. I was just afraid of criticism at first especially with Poodles. In school I hardly got to do them.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nitewalk View Post
                              Injuring a dog in any way, shape, or form.

                              I also worry about the quality of work I am doing. I grew up showing dogs and I still show my guys in conformation. I love watching my friends at shows preparing their hand stripped or perfectly scissored breeds. Then the next day I'm at work trying to hide severe bow legs on an ugly Shih Tzu... Ya know what I mean?
                              Since I put a foot in cat/dog shows world, I've seen those perfect dogs and cats matching with the standards, when a new owner told his 20lbs yorkie is the purest breed and that how they should all be looking like, tiny ones are fake and been mixed with another breed < I just want to laugh, the dog has a long body, high legs, big head, long muzzle sometimes their ears stand, sometimes they have poodle ears lol.
                              I don't even talk about Persians cat from shows and Persians I groom, I should say long haired cat who owners think being a Persian!

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