Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I groomed a dog that had been shot

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I groomed a dog that had been shot

    On Saturday I groomed 5 dogs at the same residence. One of them was a chow/shepard mix. I found out that this dog was shot 3 months ago, by a hunter who thought it was a coyote. (The dog actually looks like a big fox.) and you're not suppose to just go around shooting coyotes anyway. The scary thing is that the owner was about 20 feet behind the dog and it could have easily been them. The dog was shot in the face and shoulder. As a result he was blind in both eyes. One eye was completely gone and the lids sewn shut. The other eye was still there but he could not see out of it. When I rubbed my hand along his shoulder I could actually feel some of the pellets that were still in him. The dog was such a sweetheart. I felt for the owners. I can not imagine the panic when the incident happened, and cannot imagine the cries of pain from that sweet dog. I didn't ask what happened to the "hunter", because I was sure I wasn't going to like the answer.
    don't find yourself up a creek without a poodle.

  • #2
    Poor dog! What is it with these so called hunters. I have nothing against hunters, my family hunts, but people who cannot distinguish a dog from a coyote have no business being in the woods with a gun. Even if the dog has similar coloring...they should know the difference and know what they are aiming a gun at! Sorry but this just angers me.

    Just a month ago there was a German Shorthair that was shot by a hunter here. The owner was only a few feet behind the dog. He heard the shot, seen the dog go down and seen 2 hunters only 50 ft (if that) away. Owner ran to his dog (who was still alive) the hunters said "I though it was a coyote" and walked AWAY!!! No ..Im sorry, or let us help you get him back to the house. They just walked away! UNREAL!! The owner was too worried about his dog to get their names or tag #'s. He took the dog to the vet where it had to be put down. How can you mistake a GSP wearing a bright orange collar for a coyote?

    Someone started up a reward for info leading to their arrests. It started at $50 and people in the area have been adding to it. It's up to $3,000 now. I hope they catch these jerks. And I hope they were able to catch the people who did this to the dog you groomed.

    Comment


    • #3
      That's terrible!
      Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Fluffy Puppy View Post
        Poor dog! What is it with these so called hunters. I have nothing against hunters, my family hunts, but people who cannot distinguish a dog from a coyote have no business being in the woods with a gun. Even if the dog has similar coloring...they should know the difference and know what they are aiming a gun at! Sorry but this just angers me.

        Just a month ago there was a German Shorthair that was shot by a hunter here. The owner was only a few feet behind the dog. He heard the shot, seen the dog go down and seen 2 hunters only 50 ft (if that) away. Owner ran to his dog (who was still alive) the hunters said "I though it was a coyote" and walked AWAY!!! No ..Im sorry, or let us help you get him back to the house. They just walked away! UNREAL!! The owner was too worried about his dog to get their names or tag #'s. He took the dog to the vet where it had to be put down. How can you mistake a GSP wearing a bright orange collar for a coyote?

        Someone started up a reward for info leading to their arrests. It started at $50 and people in the area have been adding to it. It's up to $3,000 now. I hope they catch these jerks. And I hope they were able to catch the people who did this to the dog you groomed.
        That is why during any hunting season, when we go out for a hike my dog wears a bright orange vest. We even went to a pheasant shoot and you each get so many birds planted in a few fields you are not supposed to go out of your fields. She had it on. people are stupid and don't care. Some scary ones out there just want to kill something, anything.
        If your dog is fat, you are not getting enough exercise!

        Comment


        • #5
          This person may have been hunting, but he was not a hunter, if you get my meaning. A hunter doesn't shot without being sure of what he's shooting, and he makes sure there aren't any humans near the line of fire.

          When I was a kid we had buckskin Quarter Horses, and we'd have to keep them stabled or in the barn yard during deer season. There were always "weekend warriors" out, in droves, pretending they knew how to hunt. One of them shot our neighbor's Angus bull. Now how can you mistake a 2,000 pound black bull for a deer?

          Comment


          • #6
            Very Scarey!

            Wow! That is too bad about that poor sweet dog! Good idea diamienono! When we get our next dog, I'll be sure to put a vest on it when we take it out! We plan to live in the woods.

            Comment


            • #7
              Must have gotten their license from "Dick Cheney's Hunting School". Sorry, not funny. Poor, poor puppy. This type of thing is unexcusable! We have had pellets fall around us sitting on our front porch when kids are shooting at prarie dogs. The neighbor's horse was shot with a 22. My family and our dogs hunt birds but mistakes are not allowable, EVER!

              Comment


              • #8
                Poor Baby,
                I hate that people do not use their heads or in this case brain and eyes and make sure what they are shooting at is ok
                "Whoever Said That Money Can't Buy Happiness Forgot About Puppies"
                Nancy

                Comment


                • #9
                  That poor dog! I remember when I was a kid living in the country a man actually parked his car in front of our house, walked into our yard and stood right next to my bedroom window shooting at a deer in our backyard. The local farmers would actually use florescent paint and paint "COW", "HORSE" etc. on their animals trying to prevent them from being "mistaken" for a deer.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's a fear I have!! Recently (last week) there was a rabid coyote in our town that was shot, and now there are calls for hunting events and challenges for whoever kills the most coyotes! It's horrible, and I've never actually seen a coyote in our area, and granted, anything rabid is a scary thought (especially since it attacked 3 people in daylight within one mile of my house, and was found within 1/2 mile on the other side of my house). I've got 3 Belgian Malinois, who are either mistaken for small GSDs or coyotes, or mixes. Thankfully the AC by us knows the breed and doesn't feed the frenzy, but still ...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That's just repugnant.

                      I feel for that poor dog and I'm glad the owner was good enough to his dog to actually get treatment. There are some calloused hunters out there who would have just shot the dog and ended its life. Sounds like this owner was much nicer. I would have asked what happened to the other "hunter" (notice I put that in quotes?). I hope he made him pay the VET BILL at the very least!

                      Tammy in Utah
                      Groomers Helper Affiliate

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Vests

                        Where I live it doesn't matter much, no hunters. But I used to live in a rural part of Arkansas. I had two wolves one was a 6ft. 98 lb timber. the other was female and 66 lbs. As soon as deer season started they had to wear the vests...at all times. They really did look like overgrown coyotes, and each had been shot before. Wiley the male got shot twice. Never fatal thank dog. My neighbors ranch hands shot him the second time, and called me. Wiley was laying at my feet, I didn't think anything was wrong w/him. The neighbor kept insisting that it was him they shot and he saw him go down. So I started examining him..sure enough about 20 buck shots in his pelt, such thick fur, the blood hadnt reached his outer coat. He was ok, but after that they always wore orange!!..If your'e in an area that has hunters, put a vest on, I also had the thick wide bright orange reflective collars for them to wear.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's horrible. I hate to hear stories like that. My friend has a little chow something mix and she's only about 35#'s and looks just like a fox. She would follow behind us when we were trail riding so I made sure to have her mommy get her a vest and a bandana. So far she's been fine, but it's so scary to think that some idiot might "accidently" shoot her.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I used to work with one of those macho redneck type guys who had champion working English Setters and Pointers.... He always acted like they were just "business" to him.... But he showed his real feelings the day his favorite Pointer got shot by a friend of his who had never hunted with a dog..... The dog had pointed a pheasant, then was given the okay to flush, which he did flawlessly, like the champion he was. The inexperienced hunter shot before the bird was high enough, spraying the dog directly in the face..... When B--- came rushing into the animal hospital covered in blood, carrying his bleeding dog, and crying his eyes out, we all saw just how much he truly loved his dogs. Once we cleaned the wounds, we found that they were superficial, and the dog made a full recovery and continued winning field trials.... I think MOST hunters who work with dogs feel the same way as B---; it's a minority who are callous enough to just shoot their own dogs. BUT, having said that, if it's clear that the dog is severely injured and in extreme pain or struggling to breathe, and there's not a way to get to a veterinarian quickly enough, wouldn't it be better to immediately put the dog out of its misery???

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Last year our 9 yr old collie who gets very disoriented very quickly got out of the fence thru the open gate I left open while I was doing some yard work. She had never ran off before. Well that was the day she decided to go for a little walk and couldn't find her way back home. For a couple weeks, we combed the area for her. It was heartbreaking to say the least! With all the neighbors on alert, on the 15th day since she had gone missing, we got a phone call that maybe she had been spotted. We instantly dropped what we were doing and everyone jumped in the car. I saw her in the field as we drove up to an old farm house. My heart sank becuase it looked like her, but yet it didn't - I had so hoped she had just wondered up on someone's porch and being the angel that she was - they just took her in. Unfortunately that was not the case at all - she had been shot, dehydrated, starved and looked near death. My husband effortlessly swooped her up, a near 70# dog before this day, in his arms and we ran her to the Vet. My heart almost broke when they laid her on the scale and it said 42#. With lots of nursing and TLC she pulled thru and only has scars left. And we all have the trauma - we simply could and still can not imagine how anyone could shoot a pet, especially one that looks like Lassie. Diamienono was right when she said, some people just want to shoot something - anything.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X