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  • Proof of Immunizations

    Do most of you require proof of immunizations? How do you handle it in the most diplomatic manner? I want to see proof, but I need to decide how I am going to do it first. Also, what if a client does not believe in immunizations or has a titer taken occasionally to see if the next years dose is necessary, or what if the owner vaccinates herself? Thanks.

  • #2
    Any which way......

    Proof of purchase of serum if they give shots themselves, or vet proof. Proof any way possible shopuild not be that difficult. Just your policy, that is the answer to give. I need to be diligent and professional in requesting this too. No explanation, no apologies, say your insurance requires it.
    In the background my dog is squeeking her toy. Squeek, squeeeeek. hahaha

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    • #3
      The only vaccination I require proof of is current rabies. it is the only one required by law and the only one that should the dog have the disease, puts me at risk. I am mobile so dogs aren't together that don't live together. I do make it clear to them that vaccination for distemper and parvo are good to protect their pet and it is up to them to use whatever preventive measures they wish to protect their pet from these diseases. I don't feel it is my place to push other vaccines as mandatory.

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      • #4
        I forgot to mention, rabies is not legal to administer themselves in most states so the self vaccination issue is not usually an issue with that one. Oddly a few states allow the rabies vaccine to be purchased by a lay person, but will only recognize vaccination if done by a vet. So in those states, even if the owner did vaccinate, as far as the law is concerned, the dog never got vaccinated unless the vaccine was administered by a vet. I don't know of any states that allow titers as legal proof of rabies (though I wish they would). If I am wrong on that one, you can simply see the test results to verify that the pet is carrying protection and the date of the test.

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        • #5
          parvo or distemper could spread

          I would like to require proof of the others too, because an infected dog could spread the disease to other dogs that come into my shop.

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          • #6
            I groom at a Veterinary Hospital and all vaccines are required--distemper combo, bordatella, rabies. Proof of titers is acceptable for all except rabies for those, like me, who don't vaccinate. Being state law, Rabies vaccines are required. We just state the policy and that's that. People may complain about spending the money if their pet isn't current, but they suck it up and get it done.

            Linda

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            • #7
              in my city, they require you to have rabies shot every year for your dog, and as a groomer clients must supply proof of rabies. I always ask them on the phone," Do you have proof of rabies? Like the certificate the vet gives you?" If they say no, then I ask them " I can call your vet and ask, or you can stop at the vet a pick up a copy on your way to my shop." I have had problems in the past and I tell them that it is for my safety. One lady said why dont I wait to get bit then find out if the dog has rabies or not. HAHAHAH

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              • #8
                Exemptions

                Both of my dogs have had severe allergic reactions to the rabies vaccine and both now have Letters of Exemption on file with licensing, so they are no longer required to have these shots to be licensed any more. It would be a good idea to make sure you know what the law is in your area before you go demanding that people do things that's aren't required by law.

                As stated earlier, Rabies is the only vaccine required by law. If you decide you are going to insist on the other vaccines for other people's animals, please only insist on the core vaccines (distemper & Parvo) and accept titers. Also be aware that the accepted time for a vaccine to be current is now 3 years not 1 year and it has been proven by challenge now, that parvo & Distemper vaccines last at least 7 years. If you don't know what a titer is or the harm vaccines can cause, then learn by researching the issue for yourself.

                Keep current on this very controversial issue and make informed decisions. Too many groomers, boarding kennels, trainers and yes, even vets are losing good clients to those who are up to date on these issues. While vaccines are important they also cause as much harm as good and a really great owner knows this. This is one case where you don't want to be the last person on the bandwagon because it's those really great owners who care enough to learn what's best for their animals are the very people you don't want to alienate.

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                • #9
                  I, too, work at an animal hospital, and it is our policy that all dogs are vaccinated against rabies (of course) and they must have the parvo/distemper and bordetella shots as well.

                  The advantages? It helps dieter the OAY's in my area---they usually find that I'm too booked and our policies in that regard too strict so they go down the road. Which I appreciate.

                  Tammy in Utah
                  Groomers Helper Affiliate

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                  • #10
                    Well, it's not true that rabies is the only vaccination required by law in all states and situations. In Illinois, if the dog is being boarded or groomed at a boarding facility, rabies AND distemper combo are required by law. And the kennel is required to have that proof on site. So yes, we require it, or a titer if the owner so desires. We can get away with that.

                    We simply inform all new clients that we need a copy of their vaccination records. We can make a copy of theirs, or their vet can fax us a copy.

                    As for other vaccines, whether they are legally required or not, you have the right as a shop owner to set policies that you are comfortable with. While you may not feel you are at risk from distemper or parvo, your business may well be. A dog who is subclinical (either a dog who is infected but not yet showing symptoms, or a carrier who will never show symptoms) can shed a lot of parvo virus without you being aware that there's a problem. And the next young dog who enters your shop or mobile unit can become infected if they aren't vaccinated. And you might find yourself facing a law suit. Is it worth it? Only you can decide.

                    And regarding the length of time a distemper/parvo vaccine is considered effective; until the drug manufacturers start labling them as a 3 year vaccine, legally any other use is considered off-lable. I just had this discussion last month with my vet. She's perfectly happy with a 3 year protocol if that's what I chose to do, but must inform me that the vaccine is labled as yearly.

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                    • #11
                      <<Also be aware that the accepted time for a vaccine to be current is now 3 years not 1 year and it has been proven by challenge now,>>

                      I asked our vets about this, why they don't change protocol to every 3 years when AAHA advocates the 3 years vaccines (I work at an AAHA accredited hospital). The problem is that the Vaccine manufactures will not change the labeling from good for one year to good for three years. As long as the drug companies won't change labeling, Veterinarian's that go against annual vaccines are liable if a dog/cat should get parvo, lepto, whatever disease the vaccine prevents. At least my vet does let people Titer their dogs but to cover their backsides, it's got to be vaccines or titers.

                      Linda

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                      • #12
                        We require rabies vacc. for grooming. We really haven't had any problems. Most people bring it right on in. If they complain we just tell them that it's policy, and for our protection as well as the dogs.
                        Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chownpugz View Post
                          <<Also be aware that the accepted time for a vaccine to be current is now 3 years not 1 year and it has been proven by challenge now,>>

                          I asked our vets about this, why they don't change protocol to every 3 years when AAHA advocates the 3 years vaccines (I work at an AAHA accredited hospital). The problem is that the Vaccine manufactures will not change the labeling from good for one year to good for three years. As long as the drug companies won't change labeling, Veterinarian's that go against annual vaccines are liable if a dog/cat should get parvo, lepto, whatever disease the vaccine prevents. At least my vet does let people Titer their dogs but to cover their backsides, it's got to be vaccines or titers.

                          Linda
                          It's not that the manufactures will not change the labeling, it's that they cannot change the labeling without FDA approval. And to get that they have to conduct the proper studies that prove the vaccines are effective for three yeas, then apply to the FDA for approval. And we all know how quickly the FDA moves to approve anything. It's in the works. It's just going to take time.

                          And really, the vet cannot force you to vaccinate or titer test your dog if you don't want to, unless your pet will be hospitalized or is boarding/grooming at their facility. It's your pet, your decision.

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                          • #14
                            I too only give rabies. i feel that you should really only require a proof of rabies vacc. if you want the others thats fine...but if people dont vacc. for those then i'd accept a titer in exchange for the other vacc. proof. now whenever id go to board my dog somewhere he'd always have to be vacc. for those things...understandable yes...but a simple 100 dollar boarding fee shoots up to 300 something with vet visits, cost of vaccs, etc etc. last time i boarded him they didnt even tell us until we GOT to the boarding kennel (vet office/boarding kennel) that they needed to have flea/tick preventative put on! UHHHHHHH why didnt ya say this over the phone when we CALLED? too late to turn back (it was in woodstock,IL, fiance lives in carpentersville,IL now so its quite a drive, and i live in orland park,IL so thats about a 2 1/2 hr drive almost!) too late to try and find another boarding facility on short notice! so i had no choice but to say fine put it on him...i was NOT happy about it believe me! and god forbid he would have been eating a raw diet then! i know that would have been a HUGE NO NO we cant feed that!
                            again.,...either require proof of the vaccs or a titer showing that they are up to the current levels.
                            JMHO
                            Hound

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                            • #15
                              I only require rabies. I liked the previous post that mentioned that you don't want to alienate the people who are doing the research cause they're the type of customers you want. These are the people who truly care about their pet's wellbeing and are doing active research on the matter, so I want to make them happy. I insist on the rabies, cause that is needed by law, and I don't want any trouble in case someone gets bit, or whatever happens.
                              Erin
                              No Fur, No Paws, No Service.

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