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  • Cage Dryers

    What is your views on cage Dryers. They are easier because I find you can get more grooms done. But the dogs hair does not poof out or look fluffy after. So I almost prefer blow drying even though it is more time consuming. What do you guys think??

  • #2
    it depends on what you're doing. if it's a Bichon with a scissor cut, it really needs to be blown out to look it's best. if it's a little shih that's getting a 7f a/o then you can get away with putting it in the cage dryer. we usually dry them 95% of the way on the table anyway. i have a great bather. but if you need to save time and get more done save the cage dryer for the short cuts and fluff dry the little curly fluffies whose cut really depends on proper drying.

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    • #3
      I hand dry probably 95% of the dogs that come into the salon. I do have a couple of cage dryers that were purchased by the owner before she hired me. I had never used them in the past, but am now starting to use them on occassion. I use them with dogs that absolutely don't want to be hand dried, dogs that the coat doesn't matter if it's hand dried (short coats like labs) and I'll occasionally start something with a cage dryer and finish hand drying.

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      • #4
        Don't use them

        I hand dry everyone using force & stand dryers.
        I like the idea of checking the skin super uper good while drying.
        And I just like the finishes better.

        On dogs with skin issues, they just air dry & get picked up late.

        Erica

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        • #5
          I dry most dogs 95% of the way, and then they are put under the fan for a few minutes. Curly coated dogs (poodles, bichons, etc.) get dried 100%. Dogs with medical problems, or dog that get super short cuts (#10 A/O) I'll put under a fan. I definitely don't like the idea of cage drying completely. I know that you said you can get more grooms done, but I'm not sure that's the case if you think about it. I know if I have a crappily dried dog it takes me more time to correct it because the hair sticks together, doesn't fluff up nicely, etc. With a thirty second towel dry I can get most dogs done in less than five minutes. So I think that while it's ok to use a cage dryer (room temp. air, not heat) to "finish" after force drying, I definitely wouldn't cage dry the entire dog unless it was for health problems.
          Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. ~Franklin P. Jones

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          • #6
            Thanks. I don't like the idea of cage drying myself either. I seem to get a better finish every time when I blow dry and ya it doesnt take that long anyways. Its just my boss likes it when i use the cage dryer because then I can get more grooms done in a day. But I rather have quality over quantity right? I don't think that they understand that blow drying gets a better finish.

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            • #7
              Cage drying is a short substitution:

              In our salon, the bather will bathe 3 or 4 dogs, as she finishes each one she puts them in a kennel with a NO-HEAT dryer. After she finishes bathing the 3-4 she goes back and force dries them, then starts on 3-4 more baths. This gets a good start on the dogs for the groomers to get going and by the time they are done the second set of dogs are done.

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              • #8
                GR wouldn't it be more benficial

                to towel well, then to blow the dog off while in the tub- (use a GFCB outlet for this)
                using your HV with a concetrator nozzle seperating the hair & removing excess water, then place them in the crate for addtional drying, then finish with fluff drying?

                JMHO
                Erica

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                • #9
                  Cage Dryers

                  I think fluff drying makes ANY type of clip look better. Of course, if you are doing a high volume of dogs, sometimes you just don't have time. But all poodles, bichons, and curly-coated dogs should always be fluff dried if they are getting a haircut. I think this makes the difference between a haircut that looks okay, and a haircut that looks superior.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by eli View Post
                    to towel well, then to blow the dog off while in the tub- (use a GFCB outlet for this)
                    using your HV with a concetrator nozzle seperating the hair & removing excess water, then place them in the crate for addtional drying, then finish with fluff drying?

                    JMHO
                    Erica
                    This is what we do... we towel, HV for excess, NO-HEAT cage dry, then force again till complete and fluff faces. My groomers all have fluff-out and dryers to do their own fluffing as needed.

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                    • #11
                      I kennel dry very little. And when I do, I don't use anything that has heat.

                      If I want to save time, (and I always do!) I will bathe a dog, wrap it in towels, clip the towels or tie the towels in place, and then go to the next dog. I can dry the dogs MUCH quicker this way, especially cockers!

                      The dogs I DO kennel dry are dogs being taken down with a #7 blade, except curly coated dogs. I will still dry the face a little on shih tzus getting shaved with a #7, and brush the face out a little too, but kennel drying has saved me time only in that aspect. All other dogs are bathed and then hand dried, or bathed and then wrapped, then hand dried.

                      I prefer to only HV dry short coated dogs that shed because I can get more shedding hair out.

                      Tammy in Utah
                      Groomers Helper Affiliate

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