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Ever groomed a dog with Mange?

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  • Ever groomed a dog with Mange?

    Naturally, working as a groomer at a vet clinic i get pets that tend to have serious skin problems among other issues. Within the first week or so I got to shave down a husky with Demodex. It was a very sweet dog, it let me shave everything (and I had to shave it with a #40 because of its condition and because of the treatment) but I have never experienced something so revolting, disgusting and something that sticks in my mind more then what I seen on this dog.

    Mind you this was over 8 months ago, but I remember it vividly.

    This dog was in full coat and honestly it did not look like anything was wrong with it at all...until i started to shave it. I wish I could post pictures but can't because of patient privacy at the dr.s office. But the worst part of this experience...puss

    While shaving it, literally chunks of skin came off that were nothing but puss underneath. There were holes, or pockets, underneath the skin i had to clean out in the bath, this dog, named Zack btw, took nearly 3 hours and many latex gloves and almost a bottle of blade cleaner later.

    When I was finished, although Zack was clean, he still looked like he was a walking sore. I have never seen so much puss or skin falling off as i did on this dog.

    Believe me i have seen some crazy things while working there, including a 32lb tumor, a dog fight ending with both of the dogs back legs, nerves, and veins exposed...etc....but this is the most disturbing I have ever had to deal with...

    So has anyone else on here had to groom a dog with mange, or with such a serious condition that it will be burned into your memory forever?

  • #2
    The burned in to my memory dog that came in for a grooming was a chow that half his back end was eaten away covered in maggots. I could not groom it. Even though I am the groomer in a vet hosp I just could not do it. The vets and nurses ended up knocking him out and shaving him.. All those disgusting squirming maggots. I almost threw up. I feel queasy now just remembering it.

    Ive done lots of demo mange dogs but none like you experienced thank god.

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    • #3
      i just did one today actually, it was a bulldog with its entire neck covered in hotspots and layers of pus, it took 4 washings just to shave it and another 2 washings after that to get enough hair,blood and pus off it to be treated. I had to take a breather before even being able to clean the tub afterwards

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      • #4
        I've not had to shave a dog with demodex to that extent, but I spent 4 months as a vet groomer treating a doberman with adult onset demodex. He was so gross, but so sweet. So after 4 months of half a**es dreatment (owners never were totally compliant.) They were going to put him down (since he didn't have papers, their other doberman did) so I offered to take him in. Granted, at that time I was dirt poor, in college full time, making about $800/month...LOLOLOL. What was I thinking???

        He'd lay on the couch, feet off, and they would just drip puss and blood. My apartment smelled like death for a few months. I to this day have no idea how I got my whole deposit back. It took a year to finally get a negative skin scrape. (I did treat him the entire time, of course!)

        Mange is awful, but good for you for hanging in there!

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        • #5
          I have groomed a lot of dogs with mange, but it sounds like what you are describing is actually a secondary infection. Most of the mange dogs I have seen/see have simple hairloss.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jadenlea View Post
            The burned in to my memory dog that came in for a grooming was a chow that half his back end was eaten away covered in maggots. I could not groom it. Even though I am the groomer in a vet hosp I just could not do it. The vets and nurses ended up knocking him out and shaving him.. All those disgusting squirming maggots. I almost threw up. I feel queasy now just remembering it.
            My wife's grandfather had a cat that we inherited after he passed away. It was very matted. I went into the fur with scissors and the back half of her was completely raw with deep holes. Out of these tunnels came the maggots. They never quit coming out. She was completely infested. We had to put her down.

            I warn every matted dog owner of this now. Just today, I groomed a very matted elderly dog that was covered in it's own feces. I warned the owner that this WILL happen to her dog when the Blow Flies start coming out this summer if she doesn't keep her dog cleaned up.

            I still have a hard time looking at raw steak.

            I've groomed a dog that the vet suspected had mange. It was losing it's hair but was only covered with a yellow sticky goo.

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            • #7
              I've done a Yorkie X for a long time that has mange, but he only hair loss with nasty looking dry black scabs (where the hair should be.) I do hate grooming him.. since I no matter how hard I try, I always seem to hit one of his scabs and make them bleed. :-(

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              • #8
                I think my most memorable grooming experience was a male Irish Wolfhound that was covered in maggots down his back, from the occiput to tail head, then under his tail and in his groin area. Hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of maggots, crawling on his skin, in the open wounds, and you could even see them squirming around under his skin. The smell was horrible.

                Thank God we had a large animal crush in the basement. I stood him in that and hose the majority of them down the drain before attempting to clip the hair away. The worst part was holding him for Doc after I'd washed and clipped him. He had to squeeze out the maggots that were under the skin. Eeeewwwww!

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                • #9
                  Gah, ick, and ewwwww!

                  Originally posted by Helly View Post
                  I think my most memorable grooming experience was a male Irish Wolfhound that was covered in maggots down his back, from the occiput to tail head, then under his tail and in his groin area. Hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of maggots, crawling on his skin, in the open wounds, and you could even see them squirming around under his skin. The smell was horrible.

                  Thank God we had a large animal crush in the basement. I stood him in that and hose the majority of them down the drain before attempting to clip the hair away. The worst part was holding him for Doc after I'd washed and clipped him. He had to squeeze out the maggots that were under the skin. Eeeewwwww!
                  And y'all say I'M the one who paints a vivid picture with words....I think I just threw up a little.

                  My hat's off to ya, Helly ol' girl. No way no how could I be a vet groomer. I can barely stand dealing with kitty's with overgrown toenails, and, knock on wood, have yet to deal with a maggot dog. Something like what you described would send me over the edge.
                  Guard well within yourself that treasure, kindness. Know how to give without hesitation, how to lose without regret, how to acquire without meanness.
                  George Sand (1804 - 1876)

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                  • #10
                    I've done my fair share of maggot dogs. God help the owner if I find a maggot on a dog. The price of the grooming goes thru the roof.

                    I have a tendency to lose my cookies working on a maggot dog. Gross.

                    One of the vets is my area called me about a Sammy he just cleaned up. Had maggots , said they were dead and could I groom the dog. Sure send it over. Got the dog in the tub and God the maggots started coming out of it's anus. I was on the phone yelling at the vet. He sent over his tech with an emena to clean the dog out. The owner was pissed, she said it was the second time the dog had maggots. She really got pissed with her grooming bill. Dumb broad.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Fast Ellie View Post
                      I've done my fair share of maggot dogs. God help the owner if I find a maggot on a dog. The price of the grooming goes thru the roof.

                      I have a tendency to lose my cookies working on a maggot dog. Gross.

                      One of the vets is my area called me about a Sammy he just cleaned up. Had maggots , said they were dead and could I groom the dog. Sure send it over. Got the dog in the tub and God the maggots started coming out of it's anus. I was on the phone yelling at the vet. He sent over his tech with an emena to clean the dog out. The owner was pissed, she said it was the second time the dog had maggots. She really got pissed with her grooming bill. Dumb broad.

                      eww! thats about as gross as hellys story. Yea no fried rice dinners for a looooong time now.

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                      • #12
                        Excuse my ignorance, but what kind of conditions exactly happen to get a dog in that bad a state with maggots...gross. Is it mainly a certain terrain or climate or can happen anywhere and is it certain flies or all of them, is it certain times of the year. I'v been lucky not to come across this and I know nothing, but flies are everywhere and I should know this.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Yappiness View Post
                          Excuse my ignorance, but what kind of conditions exactly happen to get a dog in that bad a state with maggots...gross. Is it mainly a certain terrain or climate or can happen anywhere and is it certain flies or all of them, is it certain times of the year. I'v been lucky not to come across this and I know nothing, but flies are everywhere and I should know this.
                          The factors are variable, but heat, moisture, and an open, infected wound are the main ones. We see them more often in late spring through summer. It's possible for the maggots to start in fur that's caked in feces, even if there's so wound, and young rabbits can get them in their ears, too.

                          Maggots can be devided into two basic classes; those who only eat dead tissue and those who eat living tissue. And then there's the cutarebra, which is a maggot that will get as big as your . Thankfully we usually see only one of those, not multiple ones

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Fast Ellie View Post

                            the maggots started coming out of it's anus..
                            I just upchucked the white rice I ate for lunch...

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                            • #15
                              Trust me, it's probably the nastiest thing you will ever see. The cat that I mentioned had maggot burrows between her digestive tract and each side of her anus. There was feces coming out of these holes.

                              I just hope that if I see this again, and knowing more about it, I will be able to deal with it a little better.

                              But to be honest, that episode is really what got me into grooming. I had three pomeranians that had a little matting on them at the time and so I immediately took the clippers to them. After that cat, I swore that I'd never have a pet with ANY matted hair. So while grooming my dogs, I found that I enjoyed it and started learning more about it.

                              So I guess I owe those little white guys a big thank you. Maybe I'll take them out for cheeseburgers or something.

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