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  • Thinning shears to dematt

    What is your opinion on this? I have heard some say that it makes the dog matt faster if you use thinners to dematt, then others who say it's nonsense since we use thinners to bulk thin a lot of breeds, etc. So I'm looking for what the general consensus is on this.
    What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

  • #2
    I disagree with one of my heroes on this. I think it is OK, but if you cut across the grain it has the same clip marks as using scissors to cut out knots.
    "We are all ignorant--we merely have different areas of specialization."~Anonymous
    People, PLEASE..It's ONLY a website!~Me

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    • #3
      I use them from time to time. Only on matts that will not brush out. I don't know if they make the dog matt worse or not....I would think that if you have to dematt with thinners that is better than brushing the matt until it breaks loose.
      Mandy, Birdie, Evie, Willie and The Woo
      Check out my Blog at doggydivasdish.com

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      • #4
        I prefer using my mat comb...with the Stuff or IceonIce. Actually, I prefer No mats at all, but dream on.
        Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

        Groom on!!!

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        • #5
          I do use thinners to dematt at times. I haven't found it to encourage future matting. It may under certain circumstances, I just haven't noticed a correlation. I can't say much else. I do it, it works for me.

          I did it today. Old, ailing Schnauzer had mats in his beard. He doesn't tolerate a lot of picking and brushing anymore. The thinners got it loosened up enough to brush out and he got to keep his beard.
          That Tenacious Terrier!
          www.thattenaciousterrier.com
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          • #6
            I will use thinners to dematt before the bath if needed, and then when I scissor or clipper over the coat once it is cleaned, it is easy to see if there is damaged hair behind that still needs to be removed so that it doesn't just matt right back up again.
            Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
            www.ChrisSertzel.com

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            • #7
              Matt removal and thinning

              I do this all the time, especially when iI have a sensitve dog (older, puppy, etc). Sometimes it is the least offensive to the dog and the matted area. You really can just try 2-3 "snips" of the thinners to loosen the matt then continue with the traditional brushing and combing of the area to remove the matt.

              sittingpretty

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              • #8
                Like COS, I have certain situations where you just can't convince me there is a better way to gently remove a matt in a tricky area on a sensitive dog...than the use of thinning shears.
                I've used them for 30 years in certain de-matting situations and have never seen evidence that it causes the dog to matt worse as the coat grows back in.
                I'm sure it happens for some folks out there...but it's never happened to me.
                Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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                • #9
                  Notnhing better on schnauzer beards to me, a quick snip on matts helps loosen them.
                  ~~Everyone is entitled to my opinion!~~

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                  • #10
                    I have a shih tzu/bichon mix and one cocker that I have noticed them matting faster in the areas I used thinners to dematt. Especially with the cocker, when I first started grooming I used to bulk thin him(full coat) and found that there was intense matting by the next monthly appointment.. so for the past year and a half I haven't been and I have found less matting. Just my own experience!

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                    • #11
                      Definitely use thinners!!

                      I absolutely use thinning shears in many cases of matting. They do two things at once - thin out the coat so it is LESS likely to get matted, and release a lot of the coat so that it is not as time-consuming or irritating to the dog.

                      My motto is - if it's an area with mats, then LESS hair is less for the owners to look after, and this has worked very well for my on all types of coats for about 20 years. Maybe some thinners actually damage the cut ends of the coat and make them more able to tangle up, I don't know - but my Geibs have not had such a problem.

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                      • #12
                        Some removal of mats is ok, but if the shears are used to remove "lots" of mats in one area of to bulk thin long coats, then matting can occur in many cases. Its just ike cockers that are in shorter, growing out coats will mat up worse than longer cocker coats do and much much faster. Same as with shihtzu coat or maltese coat that is growing out after being cut short. It mats up because the ends of the hair "catch" on the others. Once they are long that doesnt happen as much. I have fllwed behind a groomer once that used thinners exclusively. She cut out ALL the mats, not brushing out any. Her dogs got more and more matted. One of her notes read "Owner MUST learn to brush more because I running out of hair to cut out". I cut the one dog she was talking about short and started over. I was able to brush it out every time for several years. the shorter, thinned out coat was matted every three weeks so badly it was impossible to do her.

                        I think that if its done correctly (like to remove one mat or a splitting a matted area into smaller mats) its a fine, acceptable technique. Use incorrectly or in large areas it can be damaging and cause more trouble than it solves.
                        <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                        • #13
                          Best way to de-mat? I'm sure that will be debated.

                          Quickest, easiest, and least painful/stress on the dog, and least labor intensive? Absolutely. I do it all the time.

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                          • #14
                            I wanted to add something else that I didn't think of before, what I think the original poster was getting at. I have been taught that bulk thinning or removing coat in layers to help it to lay more close and tight does cause matting- like some may do on a Cocker's furnishings. The reason, I was taught, is because that as the hair grows out from its short length, it often will tangle with the longer coat laying on top of it. The longer hair is growing down and across the hair that has been thinnered (or clippered) shorter, and it is growing up and out underneath the longer hair. Does that make sense? lol.
                            So, doing this on a leg that has, say, a matt around the hock, or on a elbow where the rest of the front leg is to be kept long, could in fact grow out and become matted again. This I have seen to be true, but I think that it also has to do with the method of thinnering. Top thinning and blending works great, we all know that, and dematting by using thinners works fine as long as you are not leaving behind damaged hair that is brittle and kinked or coarse from breakage. Meaning that even if you thinner out a matt on a hock or elbow, on a long full leg, you might get a matt there when the dog returns if you have left behind broken coat to grow back out. Anytime you scissor hair short and leave longer hair atop it, you can expect that it will tangle more easily, and likely come in even more "poufy" and thick at the next visit, but its really the damaged coat left behind that will cause you the problems. Is this what you were meaning?
                            Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                            www.ChrisSertzel.com

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                            • #15
                              I never use thinners to de-bulk coat, I'd rather use a coat king or something like that. I could see where thinners would cause matting as the shorter coat grows out. I do use thinners for blending and some matting as I did for an Aussie recently that had some dreadlocks hanging off it; the coat was in otherwise good condition.
                              A Light exists in Spring, Not present on the Year, At any other period -- When March is scarcely here...~~ Emily Dickensen~~

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