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Is It True? That Big Box Store Groomers Don't Use Muzzles?

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  • Is It True? That Big Box Store Groomers Don't Use Muzzles?

    Young lady calls with a 12yr old Pom she always groomed and the shop she called Pet*** near by said they don't use muzzles and IF he needs one they won't groom him. I sure don't want to try. Luckily my excuse is I don't go to her area. But gee, I never heard that before. I am also getting people who up til now just brushed them and never clippered the dog in 8-12 years. Suddenly in all this time he is matted and bites when trying to brush him. UH HUH.

    I'm thinking a dog can bite just trying to hook the GH to the grooming arm. I mean, my hand would be near the mouth. How do you hook them safely?

  • #2
    at the petsomething I work for it is true for some breeds, pomeranians are one of those breeds. Flat nose breeds and breeds prone to collapsed trachea are not allowed to be muzzled. We can use an e-collar on those breeds, but we all know that for some hard core puppies that just isn't enough. Also, on the breeds we can actually muzzle, we can only muzzle them for 20 minutes, not at a time, but 20 minutes the whole time they are there, so basically only if they only bite for certain things. We are also not allowed to use muzzles on dogs over 10 years of age, so your 12 year old pom has a double whammy. Course I think if we were allowed to use groomers helpers, the need for muzzles would be cut down, but hey, what do I know. I can understand not providing them, but why can't I buy my own? Sheesh, they give me grief for buying and using a vinyl apron to bath dogs in. I don't wear it up front, but even if I walk up front and immediately take it off they are all over me, all the while a girl has been using sunglasses every day for the last week to keep her hair off her face. Sunglasses inside are ok, but a black bathing apron that matches our uniform is not ok to wear up front for less than 30 seconds. Man I can't get out of there soon enough.
    I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
    -Michelangelo

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    • #3
      I worked at a corporate store and we could use muzzles but only for fifteen minutes at a time. We could use E-collars all we needed and we could not take any dogs over 13 years old. In general, if there was a dog that was definitely going to bite or be hard to handle, we were told to refer it to a vet groomer. We had no tables in the back rooms and it was considered bad business to fight with a dog that was trying to eat us right next to the big fish bowl windows.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by AMelena View Post

        We had no tables in the back rooms and it was considered bad business to fight with a dog that was trying to eat us right next to the big fish bowl windows.
        That is why we had so many students at the school thinking dog grooming was a cinch. They watched the guys at Petsomething do it all the time. All you did was stand next to a sedate, elderly Poodle whilst snipping at sticky-outies. Easy. Nothing to it. And it pays well.

        Hand 'em a Chow cross that wants to take a chunk out of them and they can't believe such dogs exist, let alone need to be groomed.

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        • #5
          One such place I'd applied for

          let you use muzzles but only after the dog tried to bite you. So I said no understanding about a groomer's sense and knowledge of dog posture and expressions? Nope, dog had to try to bite first. No thanks said I. Kind of like locking the barn door after the horse is stolen.
          Money will buy you a pretty good dog but it won't buy the wag of it's tail.

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          • #6
            So do you think that muzzling a potential dog who is likely to bite, is 8yr and a

            Pom or whatever is bad for the dog? The one with the poodle that is 12 has an owner thinking a muzzle for 45 mins might not be safe for the dog. I try to get the muzzle off as soon as possible, but some must have it on for the entire groom. Gee, I am surprised. I never knew this before. I do not find E collars to be easy to use.

            I asked before....how can I hook the GH to the dogs' neck without getting a nip? There are enough nice dogs out there, so I try to avoid the biters. I do applaud those who take them on, but I no longer want to take the risks. The recent phone inquirreys are those with dogs who have NEVER seen a profesisonal groomer or even clippers before at a ripe old age too. Getting bitten is never far from my mind. Lets' face it....it ain't fun and it can potentionally put us out of business. I am not a new groomer, but I am getting fearful lately. People often leave out vital information; then blame us when we can't do a complete job!

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            • #7
              I've never had a problem hooking up a dog to the GH that bites because they are going to bite when you are doing whatever sets them off, nails, feet, etc. On the GH I first hook them up on the longest length and tighten it up if they start to get aggressive for nails or feet for example. I've never had a dog get aggressive while putting on the GH or a loop.

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              • #8
                I work at a petsomething, and they are currently "testing" the GH in order for us to use it (we have to provide our own, they won't supply it). They also just approved clipper vacs and skip tooth blades if we have them. I'm waiting for the email from the higher ups on the GH though. I had asked the reps at the booth at Intergroom and was first told yes we could use the basic set, but now I hear we have to wait for approval first. They will not let us use the professional set (the back part) and we can't use the GH on cats - even though I remember Chuck showing a great way to use the GH on cats - the box store I work at doesn't allow any restraints on cats at all (hence why I don't do cats there).

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                • #9
                  Please understand that there is more than one petsomething, and they all have different policies. The one I worked for allowed the use of the Groomer's Helper, and also allowed me to muzzle at my discretion. And I always had the right to refuse service to anyone if I felt the situation warrented it.

                  What I don't understand is having a list of dogs that you can't muzzle. Those dogs can still bite. Groomers need some kind of protection against those bites. There is more than one type of muzzle, and you can select a muzzle that will safely muzzle the dog. E collars are just a total waste of time, plus they don't offer you any protection if you have to groom the body part that's trying to bite. With the right kind of muzzle you can do that.

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                  • #10
                    The poster we have in the back is a list of dogs we can't muzzle or cage dry. I'm sure the list started out fine with just brachycephalic dogs (shih tzus, boxers, pugs, etc.) but they keep expanding the list on breeds that they say have "sensitive tracheas" aka if they had an issue with one specific dog in a store they'd add it to the list to cover their own butts. So now the list includes bichons, mini and toy poodles, min. schnauzers, etc. They're restrictions are getting a bit ridiculous, and it seems the people who make these policies have never stepped foot in a grooming salon or ever tried to bathe/groom a dog.

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                    • #11
                      Yep, that's what the manager at the box told me. Their policy is a muzzle for 20 minutes max total time no matter how long the dog was there. They also told me that only 18% of their customers use their grooming services. Maybe the stores are limiting their customer base too much.

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                      • #12
                        What in the world does a "sensitive trachea" have to do with whether or not you can (or should) use a muzzle? I don't put the muzzle around the dog's throat. I don't know anyone who does. And how would an E-collar, which does go around the neck, be any better?

                        There are way too many types of muzzles available. No one should have a policy that prohibits the use of muzzles on a dog based solely on breed. If one muzzle isn't appropriate, there's another that is.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Helly View Post
                          What I don't understand is having a list of dogs that you can't muzzle.
                          When OSHA gets involved they will stop that foolishness.
                          "We are all ignorant--we merely have different areas of specialization."~Anonymous
                          People, PLEASE..It's ONLY a website!~Me

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Smart-n-Pretty View Post
                            When OSHA gets involved they will stop that foolishness.
                            That list gets longer every yr the majority of breeds that are known to be biters are all on the list when cockers get added I am outta there.. not only are these dogs not to be muzzled but any dog on that list cannot be placed in a cage dryer( room temp) . nothing like trying to fluff dry a 15 yr shihtzu's face.

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                            • #15
                              I used to work at one of the big box places...

                              Yes, I do remember that chart. I always wondered why toy poodles were on there and what a sensitive trachea had to do with it! I guess they are probably more afraid of lawsuits from pet owners than from their employees. I agree with SNP - that foolishness will stop when OSHA gets involved!

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