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  • Oh c'mon now...

    Just recently had an adorable 9 month old poodle x come in for her first haircut. Yep the dreaded over 6 mths old and never been touched before pet. Well it turned out that she did fantastic! Only one problem, she had soooo much hair packed into her poor little ears that you couldn't see a darn thing. Made the "red flag" come up. After 16 years I learned by trial and error to leave it be until I speak personally with the owners. Of course when they show I tell them that I would suggest that she have it removed by a vet due to the possibility of irritation occuring. Unless they want me to do it while they were present. Never in all my years had I seen so much hair in there! I knew they'd take the vet course of action. I couldn't even tell them if she had an underlying infection in there or not, you just couldn't see.

    Three days later she shows up at the salon (I'm not there) screaming her head off about how I gave her puppy an infection because I pulled the ear hair. Is she mental? This is apparently what the vet told her. Most likely she's just looking to get her 300 dollar bill paid. That's right 300 bucks! If so the vet contradicted himself because on the notes it states she was anesthetized and the ear hair was removed from both the left and right ear! (well gee how can that be if I already did it) And what blows my mind is not only that but her "nails were not done" guess my dremel decided not to quick a dog that day. So they did the nails for me. I was told that what the other groomers saw were nails down to the nubs with the tell tale signs of cauterization. That poor little girl!!

    Sorry guys just wanted to vent. For the most part I love all of my clients and their dogs. And I love my job! After 16 years I still can't see myself doing anything else.

  • #2
    Originally posted by wolfygirl View Post
    This is apparently what the vet told her.
    Never trust what the client says the vets says. I would talk with the vet directly. Most vets are smart enough to not make any statements that they don't have absolute proof of.
    "The most affectionate creature in the world is a wet dog." -Ambrose Bierce

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    • #3
      We have a policy in which any issues with a Vet.. I must talk to the Vet. Ive had a few who tried to 'collect' but once I demand to speak directly to the Vet.. I put in nicely, as in I am overly concerned about the pet... I explain IN DETAIL what I saw adn the Vet always says "OH, they didnt tell me that"...

      I had one 'one time' client... called me about a medical issue.. it was a lab mix, just a bath & brush out and I only used a rubber curry. Owner said I scraped the dog until it bled. Asked to speak to the Vet... the Vet explained the skin issues were scrapes about an inch apart and rather deep... I called the number we had been given to contact the owner... his sister answered not thrilled to having to talk to me, shared how her brother was an alki who owed her money, the dog (she hated by the way) was kept out in the garage and kept knocking over all her things.. turns out the skin issues were from a garden rake and when I spoke again to the Vet... she agreed!

      SO, always good idea to speak to the Vet directly!

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      • #4
        I agree with others - speak to vet

        I highly doubt that the vet said what the owners SAYS he/she said, unless the vet is as kooky as the owner.

        And the nails were quicked under sedation while they did ears - sounds OK to me.

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        • #5
          Additionally -

          I'm thinking that the vet probably ADMIRES you for telling the owner to go there rather than attempt so much on the pup. PLUS the vet got some extra $$ (although we don't even know if it was actually $300 because the owner is likely lying about EVERYTHING.)

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          • #6
            I think you should talk to the vet. I personally think that dogs do get ear infections from plucking the ear hair. Especially a 9mo old dog that has never had the ear hair plucked. Plucking the ear hair will cause inflammation and it can lead to an ear infection.
            I'm sure the lady is over exaggerating about all the things the vet said. But I do recommend that you do some research on this forum on plucking the ear hair. There are many groomers that are not plucking the ear hair anymore because we've started to see evidence that plucking will actually cause an infection rather than prevent it.

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            • #7
              Not only the pet owners but

              the breeders that sell dogs ,do not educate new pet owners, as much as I do not like dog breeders and I' am against breeding an animal for a profit,enough unwanted pets in the world. I believe that they are the big contributors to the problem with pet owners no knowing about simple problems with certain breeds might have,like cockers ears,most breeders won't tell the new pet owner about all the infections if ears are not properly taken care of,but then they might not be able to sell the dog and make their money,though pet owner can easy Google their breed and find out a few things about their dog,there's stupid all around us.
              Last edited by desertdogs64; 05-09-10, 03:17 PM. Reason: added

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              • #8
                Not a breeder problem. It's an owner problem. Good breeders are extremely educational with their puppy buyers when they sell a puppy. Mine go home with a huge binder with tons of information. Responsible breeders want their puppies well taken care of.

                Yes, there are bad breeders in this country. However, if owners would do their homework, and owners would listen to their vet, things like this wouldn't be common. Every owner chooses the source of their puppy and chooses whether they go to a quality breeder, or any other method of obtaining a pet. The vast majority of vets do a ton of education on proper pet care. Most vets would rather prevent problems than have to solve problems. And owners make their own choice as to which vet they go to. However, there are good and bad owners out there. It is 100% the owner's responsibility as to how a pet is taken care of.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by windfall4 View Post
                  I think you should talk to the vet. I personally think that dogs do get ear infections from plucking the ear hair. Especially a 9mo old dog that has never had the ear hair plucked. Plucking the ear hair will cause inflammation and it can lead to an ear infection.
                  I'm sure the lady is over exaggerating about all the things the vet said. But I do recommend that you do some research on this forum on plucking the ear hair. There are many groomers that are not plucking the ear hair anymore because we've started to see evidence that plucking will actually cause an infection rather than prevent it.
                  uummm, she didn't pluck the ear hair, she sent it to the vet for the vet to do it.
                  I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                  -Michelangelo

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                  • #10
                    Caution when it comes to Vet's

                    Let me tell everyone a tale. I became State Certified about 4 years ago. In my class were 2 students; both previous vet techs...from different areas. Both had the same sick tale about what they were told shortly after working at the vet clinics. When expressing anal glands...if you happen to burst them..."always" blame it on the groomer. If it were to happen...they were told to fish around in conversation as to when the dog had its last groom...and the blame goes from there. Now come on...that is sick! Both of these people were true dog lovers and left for that and other "sick" reasons. Now thats a real big coincidence to hear the same type of story from 2 totally unfamiliar people. So...watch out. I had it happen to me...groomed a pair of Bichons; but never do anal glands on them. Then they had a vet trip for an office/teeth cleaning visit and wha-la....the vet tech's come out to speak with her. It was quite clear they had recently been groomed up so all of a sudden she is told that her groomer must've burst an anal sack and was bleeding. Of course I get a call. This is a client of 3.5 years...and she believed in me and my care of her beloved Bichons. My point....not everyone is reputable.

                    Poochlady

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SwissNChow View Post
                      Not a breeder problem. It's an owner problem. Good breeders are extremely educational with their puppy buyers when they sell a puppy. Mine go home with a huge binder with tons of information. Responsible breeders want their puppies well taken care of.
                      I think the key part here is "good breeders". I would wager for every good breeder out there, there are 100 who are terrible. Maybe even more than that, but just a guesstimate. I agree that the owners should do proper research, but it is also the breeders responsibility to educate the owner. You obviously feel that is important also, you give them loads of information. The problem is that 99% of the dogs we see every day are not from show kennels that health test their dogs and educate the buyers. There are even lowlife people who completely lie about the maintenance needed for their "breed", doodles for instance. I care very much about my dogs, but there was a time when I needed to be educated as well, by the rescue I adopted my first dane from. I am very thankful they started me down the path of understanding and now seek and learn on my own, but before that I just had no idea.
                      I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                      -Michelangelo

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                      • #12
                        The powers that be are taking over the rest of the incident. I can't spend my days worrying over something that I know for a fact wasn't my fault I've been doing this long enough to know when a pet should or should not have their ear hair plucked.

                        Thanks guys for the input it's greatly appreciated.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gr8danlvr1 View Post
                          I think the key part here is "good breeders". I would wager for every good breeder out there, there are 100 who are terrible. ...I adopted my first dane from. I am very thankful they started me down the path of understanding and now seek and learn on my own, but before that I just had no idea.
                          But it's the uneducated owners that choose to buy from the terrible breeders in the first place. It's kind of a "which came first; the chicken or the egg" situation. If people didn't support irresponsible breeders; they wouldn't be able to turn a profit and they would dissapear. If people didn't see dogs as disposable, they would put more though into buying one, training it and making sure it didn't contribute to the overpopulation problem. If irresponsible breeders didn't flood the market w/ cute, readily available, "cheap" puppies, then people would have no other choice then to rescue (w/o irresponsible breeders there would be fewer dog in need of rescue) or buy from good breeders.

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                          • #14
                            In an ideal world, breeder's educating their puppy buyers would be the key. But ultimately, the responsibility comes down to the owner to get themselves educated.

                            Let's take a look at our own educational efforts. How many times do you work on educating your clients, only to feel that you are beating your head against a brick wall? The umpteenth time you tell the client about how long toenails affect the dog and that they are crippling their dog, and that they really have to be trimmed every _ weeks, you tell the owner about how unhealthy it is for their dog for them to be ungroomed all year, and simply get shaved down every spring. Yet, once a year, the same dog comes in for it's yearly nail trim and shave down. From what you are saying about breeders, this owner's lack of getting their dog's nails trimmed is a GROOMER problem! I stand by the premise that this is an OWNER problem. You can educate people all you want, but it won't make them become knowledgeable. It is up to the owner to take in the information, process it, and then do something about it.

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                            • #15
                              Hmmm

                              Originally posted by gr8danlvr1 View Post
                              uummm, she didn't pluck the ear hair, she sent it to the vet for the vet to do it.
                              She suggested to go to the Vet for plucking since she didn't feel good about plucking those particular ears. Thus basically believed in Plucking So a mention of non-plucking practices seems appropriate, at least to suggest a search of the subject on here. If it had been me, a non-ear plucker, I would have explained what seems to be a problem with ear plucking and why I wouldn't do it. I would not have suggested a Vet, but that's simply my opinion from years of experience.

                              Regarding the nails, it might have been that they clipped the nails while the dog was anesthesized. It is not too uncommon to quick them while they are under. I'm not sure if it hurts them after the fact.

                              Yes, I'd speak with the Vet. It sure sounds like a customer you won't be wanting around.
                              Money will buy you a pretty good dog but it won't buy the wag of it's tail.

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