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  • Need advise Please

    Ive been groom for right a yr now. I have been clipper burning some of my clients I havent had a problem until about the last 2 wks I don't know what Im doing wrong. I try to be really careful. It seems to be in the same place every time on their bellies and groin area. I use a 10 blade. The owners say that it don't show up until a day or two afterward. What can I do to keep this from happening? I need advise from some of you that have been groom awile. Thanks

  • #2
    I don't know, could it be a bad blade drive or one missing teeth? Usually 10's are very safe

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    • #3
      It's spring

      Are these dogs matted? Is the blade going closer? Or are the dogs going wild because they haven't been groomed for 4-12 months??

      These are factors, too.

      Maybe your blade is adjusted a little too close? Or it needs sharpening and is pulling/irritating a bit??

      LOTS of things - especially if it's showing up later, it is not likely a hot clipper blade, it is something else.

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      • #4
        Dull blades or bad blade drive is my guess.

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        • #5
          I agree, with the possiblity of dull, damaged blades....but I'd make sure you're disinfecting and cleaning them as well. I've seen a nasty skin infection/irritation come from ill cleaned equipment.

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          • #6
            Make sure that the sanitary is the first thing you do, before the blade has had a chance to heat up. And don't dig around the vulva area. I usually kind of skim mine.

            Are they SURE it's clipper irritation? If the dog is suddenly clean (hey, it can get pretty breezy back there when just clipped!) it may be a little itchy and the bumps/red spots they are seeing are from a secondary reaction of the dog's. It's hard to tell.
            There are 3 different kinds of people in this world: Dog people, cat people, and rational people who don't have a problem liking two things at the same time.

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            • #7
              If the dogs haven't been groomed for awhile then possibly the irritation is caused by them licking the area repeatedly for after you have groomed them. They are feeling "different" down there and maybe a bit itchy or prickly from the newly clipped hair. A day of licking could do this to their skin. I try to advise my clients that the dog may lick a little with a new hair cut, a little sprinkling of Gold Bond powder often helps.

              I'd also consider the possibility of your blade slipping a bit.

              sittingpretty

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              • #8
                Not only bad blades but a bad clipper too. I have one that sounds well and runs but struggles. I thought it was the blade but it was the clippers because I always keep a backup...and the backup clipper works fine.

                I test the blade ALL THE TIME with my hands because blades heat up fast...esp with fast clippers. Once they heat up, even spraying them - they heat up even quicker. Remember its getting warmer outside and all the effects me (I am mobile).

                I have quite a few 10 blades AND a full can of coolant. I change blades all the time when shaving down any area and constantly spray them

                I am paranoid about this because some years ago I was working in a shop. A woman said her dog had clipper burn all over, she took him to the vet where he went on meds. It was the manager who groomed the dog and at first she denied the dog had any burn on him because she is always careful. When the woman came in with the vet bill the manager actually turned and asked me if at any point I groomed her dog because that would explain the dogs burn! She suggested that as she was so very experienced in grooming there was NO WAY she could clipper burn a dog so it must have been me (I was new and this was my first job). I said no of course not. Surely the manager would remember if she abandoned the dog at any time and I took over....anyway for the rest of the short time I worked there, this manager had convinced herself that I must have run my clippers on her dog.

                So it can happen to anyone...but that story above is the reason I am paranoid about heated blades.

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                • #9
                  First point to clear up. Clipper "burn" is not a thermal burn. The irritation does not come from a hot blade. It's caused by friction. Just like a rope burn (those who grew up with livestock are all too familiar with that) isn't caused by heat.

                  Second, clipper irritation (I really hate calling it a burn) shows up quickly. It's not something that pops up a day or two after the groom. My guess is the dogs are doing it to themselves by licking/scratching. So we have to determine why they're licking and scratching. My first guess would be shampoo residue. Second would the razor stubble.

                  Make sure you're double checking the groin area and belly for any shampoo when you rinse. When you think the dog is completely rinsed, rinse again.

                  Try to use a longer blade on tummies and the inside of the back legs. I do them with a 7. That eliminates a lot of the itching caused by razor stubble. I'd also suggest a light application of corn starch or baby powder (don't use talc, get baby corn starch powder). If they're itching from stubble, it helps.

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                  • #10
                    I go with the dull blade vote. Especially since it only started happening a couple weeks ago. when blades get dull you can start getting clipperburn with them.

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                    • #11
                      I think you pretty much have your resolve here based on everyone's answers it's just a matter of narrowing the issue down now I just wanted to add a 10 blade is a safety blade and I wouldn't dare advise you to use a 7 on sanitary areas, that can be quite dangerous even for someone with a good amount of experience. Stick to your 10 and take it slow. Try not to repeatedly run over the same area. Every single hair does not need to be perfect.

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                      • #12
                        What Helly is saying makes alot of sense I have a new girl that is helping me bathe. I'm wondering now if she is getting them rinsed good She started about a month ago. The clients are saying that the dogs are licking and licking. When I see the irritation it does look more like a rope burn. I have had plenty of them on my hands from the horses. I just never put the two together. Thanks Helly

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LexPauline View Post
                          I think you pretty much have your resolve here based on everyone's answers it's just a matter of narrowing the issue down now I just wanted to add a 10 blade is a safety blade and I wouldn't dare advise you to use a 7 on sanitary areas, that can be quite dangerous even for someone with a good amount of experience. Stick to your 10 and take it slow. Try not to repeatedly run over the same area. Every single hair does not need to be perfect.
                          I learned using a 7 on sanitary areas. When I went on to work with another salon, I learned to use a 10. I liked a 10 better, just seemed cleaner. I am working part time at the salon where I learned to groom again and I've had a complaint about it being too short from a client... my boss told me that the dogs that go there aren't used to a 10. I don't know what to think now. In my own salon I've gone back to the 7. I'm so confused! But I'm liking the 7 again cause I just feel like I'm dodging some clipper irritation problems. I've had a few dogs stop coming and I wonder if thats the reason cause I've had new clients come to me cause their last groomer gave them razor burn on the groin....I try to tell them that some dogs just can't handle getting clipped there and that they should always call back and let the groomer know cause there's ways to prevent it.

                          Anyways... darn clipper irritation!!!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pjsgroom View Post
                            What Helly is saying makes alot of sense I have a new girl that is helping me bathe. I'm wondering now if she is getting them rinsed good She started about a month ago. The clients are saying that the dogs are licking and licking. When I see the irritation it does look more like a rope burn. I have had plenty of them on my hands from the horses. I just never put the two together. Thanks Helly
                            Helly makes a lot of sense. I bet that is the problem

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                            • #15
                              Are dull blades really a possible cause of irritation? When blades are dull, they don't even cut hair properly. I know that every time I've gotten razor burn on my legs it was because I was using a new, sharp razor. When my razors get used a few times, they're dull and don't even get the hair, much less cause irritation to my skin.

                              In any case, after shaving delicate areas I give a quick, light shot of Shave Relief spray. A bottle costs very little and lasts a long time. It's good insurance- I've never had a case of irritation after using it, even with dogs I know to be sensitive. And for these sensitive guys, I've even been known to give a quick spray before shaving, as it gives the skin a protective coating.
                              The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit. ~Nelson Henderson

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