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  • Rust looking stuff on Dog

    OK I only have a few hour, but I hope a get a response before the. I read about this somewhere, but for the life of me I can't remember what it is. Can anyone tell me what would cause a dog to have rust looking stuff on there hair? I'm going to try to attach a photo. It has a strange texture to it, I didn't notice a smell. I pick her up in a few hours to groom her. Just wondering what it could be.Click image for larger version

Name:	Rust on Contest D.jpg
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    I hope the photo worked =/ I haven't done that since the change in the board.
    "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin

  • #2
    NO ONE??? I can't believe this got shuffled out of new thread so fast =(
    "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin

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    • #3
      Clearly the dog is a robot.



      (It has only been an hour, during normal business hours. Wait a bit, I am sure someone will post a real answer later today or tonight.)

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      • #4
        3:35 and still cant see pic so have no idea

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        • #5
          The pic looks to me that the dog is severely matted. Possibly stains from licking from a previous sore? or the discolor could also be flea dirt?

          Once you get the hair off you should be able to tell.

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          • #6
            It looks like chewing. That will cause the stains. They are saliva stains, not rust. They also can be caused by allergies, but usually its saliva.
            <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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            • #7
              I was going to suggest it was staining from saliva, but didn't want to speak before I saw the pic. But yes, it definitely looks like staining from licking/chewing. Now, please correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't the staining come from a form of oxidation to the coat from the saliva?
              What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

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              • #8
                I think it is staining too from saliva

                but I thought it was from the acidic nature of the saliva. My dogs' beards are not stained and I think it is due to their saliva being less acidic. By the salivary glans you can see stains on almost any dogs' mouth.....hense from the saliva.

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                • #9
                  I also...just finally saw the pic, so I know it's too late for you...but to me it looks like saliva stain...possibly from a previous "insult' to the skin.
                  Something like a flea allergy or reaction to a chemical or food(?) that started the dog itching and chewing. It looks like it is growing out in your picture?
                  As I recall...saliva stains are the result of an enzyme in the saliva oxidizing and then coming into contact w/ some sort of specific hair/fur/skin
                  cells in a dog.

                  I know of someone that is a veterinarian and shows dogs, and gives his Veteran Dogs a chewable Maalox a day to change the ph of the saliva (sort of like what jen was referring to) and his old dogs never have any eye staining or lick-spot staining or staining around their rears.
                  I've never done that...but then again...I don't show old dogs, lol!
                  Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

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                  • #10
                    Looks like saliva staining as well. My Shbia gets staining, though hers is a deeper reddish colour.

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                    • #11
                      After thinking about this, yeast will also cause that color staining. It IS technically a form of oxidation but it isn't rust. UNLESS its yeast causing the staining in which case its the waste from the yeast micro organisms that stained the hair. I would wager that Angel's Eyes or Glow or even low dose tetracycline MIGHT take the color out from the new hair. The old hair will have to grow out.
                      <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                      • #12
                        Thanks everyone, it was only on the hair and the texture of the hair was really different. She was matted really bad, but I was able to get enough out to keep furnishing, and I used her in a Extreme Doggie Do over at the Everything pet show in Cincinnati, and Won First place with her. Thanks for all your replies. It took 3 baths just to start to get a lather on this poor girl. She had a total of 5 baths to get her squeaky clean.
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                        "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mylady View Post
                          Now, please correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't the staining come from a form of oxidation to the coat from the saliva?
                          No, the red staining is one of two things; red yeast or the saliva's digestive enzymes. Or a combination of both.

                          Saliva isn't strong enough to actually digest the hair, because it's main purpose is to start breaking down carbohydrates. But it does cause some staining. But it's not really oxidation. It's digestion.

                          If the hair stays wet all the time, it'll start to grow red yeast. That's what causes the really red staining under the eyes and in beards on some dogs.

                          I most strongly object to using an antibiotic for what is essencially a cosmetic problem. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is responsible for the emergence of the nasty strains of e-coli and MRSA that can kill. We don't need to further the development of antibiotic resistence in bacteria. The ones we already have to deal with are bad enough.

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                          • #14
                            If it was the Red yeast would it leave the hair tacky feeling? Were the hair was red it had a rough texture to it, and when using thinning shears in those area, it was really tough.
                            "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin

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                            • #15
                              Yes it can change the texture of the hair. Also, licking and chewing will cause the texture to change. I find often that allergy type coats with staining feel different than the rest of the hair. drier, stickier, more strawlike. Helly, I can see how a short term use of an antibiotic could be benficial. I think that the yeast is itchy, making trhe dog scratch MORE. By killing the bacteria that they yeast feeds off of you can stop that cycle. Its NOT just cosmetic. Its about making the dog more comfortable. I WOULD say to stop using it once the problem resolves, but I cannot see letting a dog suffer when it can be easily treated. We KNOW yeasty skin itches, so why not stop it?
                              <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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