Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hips

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hips

    I had a client today ask me advice about a mastiff pup she wants to purchase.. the breeder ( who I know and seems like a decent person) doesnt have anything about the hips except reference letters from previous buyers..

    so what and how would she find out about the hips.. she had a boxer who supports her vet already and doesnt want another money pit pet.. but really likes this pup. who is about 5-6 weeks, so she has a few more weeks to decide..

    I really dont know much about this area. advice is appreciated

  • #2
    she can go to the OFA website www.offa.org and look up the dog or others in the dogs pedigree. That will show if they are having their dogs xrayd. That is only if they OFA there is Penn hip evaluation but it doesn't post the results. Why doesnt' she just ask for proof? Ask the breeder for health clearances on the dog.

    Amante

    Comment


    • #3
      Would the potential buyer be willing to pay for x-rays of the parents hips to make sure they're OK? At least that would be something. It won't guarantee perfect hips in the puppy, but it's better than nothing. Also, if the hips are done by a certified orthopedic vet, they can be sent in to the OFA and results recorded. If the hips are good, that would be more of a selling point for pups (the breeder must be a "backyard breeder" right?).
      With such a large breed, known for orthopedic and heart problems, they should be very cautious about buying from a breeder that doesn't do any testing.

      The potential puppy buyer may want to look at this website:
      http://mastiff25.tripod.com/mastif/id12.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry, but that breed and the breeder doesn't OFA the hips, I wouldn't buy the pup! I realize OFA parents do not guarantee the pup's hips will be good, but it definitely gives you a better chance of having good hips. I had a friend that bought two mastiffs, littermates, neither parent was OFA, but the "breeder" told my friend she had never had a problem in her dogs before. Both dogs were lame with dysplasia before they were two. Neither one of the dogs saw their third birthday due to health and behavioral issues.
        Lisa VanVleet, RVT

        Comment


        • #5
          OFA won't certify a pup's hips (at least not a bernese pup's hips) until they have xrays at two years (or older), as they are done growing and won't change anymore. I would suggest finding a vet (preferably one that won't sedate for xrays) and have them do preliminary hips and elbows... the vet should be able to give you a good idea about the dog's hips. I would be concerned at whether or not the breeder is reputable and proceed with caution.... everyone I know that breeds large breed dogs is adamant about hip and elbow xrays, and reference letters don't tell a lot, especially if they are from people who got their dogs recently.... sometimes a dog won't show signs of hip or elbow dysplasia until they get a little older, and I have seen gorgeous show dogs that move beautifully have their OFA tests fail....

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree w/ the above posters. No way would I take reference letters from previous buyers as my only security. OFA, pennhip, something tangible in the form of XRays or measurements.
            That's wayyyy to big a dog w/ a short enough lifespan as it is,...to unnecessarily risk having them going down at the age of 2 w/ dysplasia.
            Not to mention a hip replacement surgery.
            Often it's not what you say, but how you say it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have an OFA certification in Wyatt's file. Big deal. Poor dog has the worst hips in the world and is currently on Metacam (day 2 of this, we just switched him over from Deramax) and Tramadol to handle any breakthrough pain. His days of going for walks (his absolute favoritest thing in the world next to sourdough bread) are over. He has not yet come to grips (DH and I are actually having trouble with that, too) with the fact that he can no longer do all the things he loves to do, like leaping to his feet and racing to the door or running around the backyard barking at the birds/squirrels/catnextdoor. He'll still do it, and he still hops up on the couch, on the bed, trots around the house, etc. But he pays a price for it and it hurts my heart to watch, even if it is momentary. We have to constantly monitor him to make sure he doesn't hurt himself and prevent him from overdoing it. We also spend well over $150/month on medications to keep him comfortable.

              For us, the OFA cert doesn't mean diddly squat. Wyatt is the result of bad breeding, pure and simple, and I have veterinary receipts in excess of $10,000 built up over the last 10 years to prove it. We watch and worry about him constantly. I was told that labs generally live to be about 12 years old. If I'm completely honest with myself, I realize we probably wont get that lucky. He just turned 10 in
              December. As age takes the inevitable toll on his body, we are faced with the very real possibility that he may not make it through the year. Just typing that sentence....puts me into a depression. If I think about it too much, I cry. He is the dog of my heart and I love him with every fiber of my being, perhaps more than may be healthy. Never having children makes him the closest I'll ever get to having a son. BUT, had I known then what I know now, I would never have adopted this particular dog. Of course, I would've missed out on the best dog that has ever graced the planet (the premier dog of the western world, as my dad used to say).
              Guard well within yourself that treasure, kindness. Know how to give without hesitation, how to lose without regret, how to acquire without meanness.
              George Sand (1804 - 1876)

              Comment


              • #8
                20% of OFA tested Mastiffs fail hips, and 15% of OFA tested Mastiffs fail elbows. Now, those are the percentages for dogs in good breeding programs that are actually tested. Most Mastiffs are never tested, so I shudder to think what the percentages would be in the "pet" population. In such a big dog, that is extremely important to consider.

                If the breeder tests, they will have the paperwork to prove it. If they don't have it, they don't test. If the breeder didn't bother to test, they either don't care or are uneducated about proper dog breeding. In either case, I would not purchase a puppy from the litter. Even if the breeder has reference letters from other puppy buyers, unless those reference letters are stamped with the OFA symbol, they mean nothing when talking about hips or elbows. NO breeder that wants to sell their puppies is going to give out reference letters that are bad. Also consider this, most quality breeders don't repeat litters. Rarely do you see two litters out of the same sire and dam. Unless those references are for dogs of the exact same breeding, you have nothing to go on when it comes to a health guarantee. If the breeder is doing the exact same breeding as previous litter/litters, the odds of them being a quality breeder that really has studied and knows about their breed is slim.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In certain breeds I would not worry about OFA hip certs on sire and dam. But PLEASE tell her she must have OFA on this breed. Bad hips on a giant breed can be a very serious issue. Giant breeds who are hauling around 80 - 200 lbs will have serious problems that will alter the dogs quality of life and pose a financial burden to the owner. I do not care what the breeder says...if you do not test, you do not know.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My parents berner is very well bred with a fully tested parents and his hips and elbows are fine. His knees are another story. Big dogs' joints will cost you plenty of money when they get old. The weight just does that sometimes, good genes or no, and she should know that. That said, big dogs tend to be my favorites and many problems can be minimized by a good diet and weight management. We all know a fatties joints go sooner than a strong lean dogs will.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the information!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I would just tell your friend not to chance it. I just don't understand people who by from breeders who don't do necessary health testing. No, it is no guarantee, but I would want to know the breeder had the dog and the breeds best interests at heart. It is true you can't get definitive ofa on a dogs hips until it is 2 yrs, but they can sure as heck ofa the parents and grandparents, etc. When you buy from a breeder who doesn't show and doesn't health test you are in a **** shoot. and quite frankly it is those dogs more often than not that will end up w/ problems. If you don't do the homework to support the best breeders, than you might as well rescue. W/ a rescue you are still getting the same health **** shoot, but at least you are saving a life.
                        I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.
                        -Michelangelo

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's a hard call a client of mine drove hours to visit a mastiff breeder and pick out a puppy. I had told her to ask for hip information well she didn't and feel in love with a pup brought him home and on his first birthday noticed he was limping took him to the vet and after some testing they found out he had a problem with his right hip. They tried surgery and meds but he was in a great deal of pain and they had to put him down. It was so sad. I know that you can't always be sure of a dogs healthy but if you can protect yourself them do
                          "I've seen a look in dogs' eyes, a quickly vanishing look of amazed contempt,
                          and I am convinced that basically dogs think humans are nuts." - John Steinbeck
                          www.wagmoresalon.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            No way should she buy the pup without several generations of ofa on hand, as everyone stated no garutees but it sure does make a difference if parents and grands had good hips. And some good lond time breeders DO repeat a particularly good breeding, once then move on.
                            ~~Everyone is entitled to my opinion!~~

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Odette is right, some litters are repeated, even with top notch breeders, but they do tend to be few and far between and only done if it is an exceptional litter. However, in this situation it doesn't appear as though there is any health testing done for the litter, and with that, repeating litters isn't a good sign.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X