Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vets that Play Blame the Groomer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vets that Play Blame the Groomer

    Now I love my personal vet. He's a practical cost effective honest gent and I appreciate that. However not all vets in the area I service are so pleasant. Recently, I had a client call to be removed from a schedule because although I do a great job her pet was just back from the vet and he said she had skin and ear issues (the dog has that yeasty scabby skin), something she can't understand would happen. Now understand that for the last 6 months I have been instructed to ONLY use her VET provided clorohexidine shampoo and nothing else. As for the ears, I had informed her they were looking kind of red and although we cleaned/plucked them to keep an eye on them. Why can't some vets just be honest and tell their clients that some dogs are just predisposed to skin and ear problems. Groomers DO NOT give ear infections. The only thing we can truly give as far as a medical condition is (pardon my spelling) is fununculolsis. Which is from rancid shampoo, dirty equipment etc. I don't diagnose because I trust the vet's education and experience to manage their clients as I would like some of them to respect ours as well. We see their cleints more often than and are a valuable resource in the pets well being. I just wish some vets would stop using the groomer as a scape goat and perhaps try to enlist or help instead.

  • #2
    Speaking up for the vets, I know for a fact that what the owner heard and what the vet actually said are often vastly different.

    The vet asks when was the last time the dog was groomed, or was the dog groomed recently. That's a pertinent part of the dog's medical history, and the vet is just trying to get as much information as possible. But what the owner hears is "It's the groomer's fault."

    Sometimes it is something the groomer did. Plucking ears can indeed cause or exaserbate infections. If the ears were already red and inflammed, you shouldn't pluck them. Let the vet see them "as is." And if you put it in writing "Ears red and swollen. Lots of debris. Did not clean or pluck so vet can see the exact condition." the vet has no reason to blame you. It was already that way, and you opted not to play vet and "treat" them.

    In the same way, sometimes we find skin that's obviously infected. Write a "report of findings". "Skin red and irritated. Patches of crusts and hair loss." Again, you covered your butt, as well as letting the vet know this is not something that happened as a result of the groom, but was already there.

    Sometimes the problem is an allergic reaction to one or more products the groomer used. It's possible the groomer caused some clipper irritation or brush burn. If that's the case, we need to admit it. We can't control allergies, but we can make note of it, and not use the same products. And if it's clipper or brush burn, we know what we have to do to prevent that.

    Not saying vets never blame the groomer, because for some it's a convenient excuse that beats admitting they don't know. But often, it's a case of an owner not hearing what the vet actually said.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have to agree with Helly on this one. I have worked in a veterinary hospital for 14 yrs and I know talking to clients is like playing that old children's game telephone. You know where the first person whispers something to the next person who whispers to the next person and so on and by the time the last person gets the message, it is totally different from the original. The only thing I don't understand is how the message gets so garbled from the vet to the client. I myself have had conversations with clients only to hear them repeat what they heard to the vet or a friend and it wasn't at all what I had said. I can understand the vet questioning razor burn or some other scrotal irritation so soon after grooming...you answered those questions very well.

      Comment


      • #4
        When my uncle sold his last litter of lab pups, one of the pups went to a family with an adult retarded son. The parents allowed the son to take the dog on a walk and he dragged the puppy to death. When the owner took the puppy to the vet they were told it was congenital and called my uncle and demanded a refund, which he gave them. My uncle then called their vet to get the details so that he could know if there was risk for his dogs or any of the other puppies. The vet told him that she had lied to "ease the pain" and admitted the truth. Now the owners have the money, no clue of the real cause, and will probably go out and get another puppy. Lets just hope the vet says something if they do or they decide to watch their son a bit more closely around the new dog.

        Comment


        • #5
          They key here is to CYA. Try to remember to look in dogs ears, at their skin, etc...before the groom. Then you can say "it looks like something is going on with Boot's ears, he should see a vet, and I shouldn't mess with his ears today so the vet can get accurate slides." If they are bad but not horrid I've been known to take a cotton swab of right & left ear, place in 2 labeled baggies for the owner to take to the vet for a slide. (worked for vets for 10 years).

          And if you notice an issue during the groom be sure to say something when they pick up, or a week later you're liable to get a phone call about an ear infection that appeared *after* being groomed.

          I like Helly's suggestion to write up the problems, will have to start doing that.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think Barkleigh sells slips for veterinary referral where you write down your findings. I'm lucky in that I work at a vet, and I will totally agree that clients will often hear what they want to hear! It's like a game of "telephone".
            Bulldogs are adorable, with faces like toads that have been sat on.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm also with Helly on this one. Plus you never know what the owner may have told the vet. I groomed a extremely matted shihtzu mutt had the owners sign the release, explain the possible problems of a dog in this condition. This poor little thing had awful skin some sores under the matts and the like. I took pictures and informed the owners when they picked up that as I had said remove this dogs coat had un covered some skin issues that required a vet visit. They thanked me and did take the little thing to a vet, well I soon get a phone call from them going on and on how the vet had told them that all the skin problems were my fault and they wanted all their money back plus vet expenses.. I remind them of the release they signed but did tell them if they could provide me with something from their vet stating I was the direct cause of the problems I would be happy to talk to them about a refund. Well need less to say I received nothing from the vet, I even called and talked to the vet ( a friend) and asked about the dog's condition and if they had told her that this little guy had been matted into a doggy hair cast prior to his visit..

              You just never know what goes on with people always cover yourself better safe than sorry.
              "I've seen a look in dogs' eyes, a quickly vanishing look of amazed contempt,
              and I am convinced that basically dogs think humans are nuts." - John Steinbeck
              www.wagmoresalon.com

              Comment


              • #8
                When I read the OP I was going to post pretty much exactly what Helly said. Now I don't have to.

                I do know for a fact that what the vet says and what the owner hears are often two different things and that very few vets will come right out and blame the groomer. They might give recent grooming as one option of what could happen but they also probably gave a list of other things. The owner picks and chooses what they want to hear or the easiest to hear. (blaming the groomer for bad skin is a lot less complicated then starting different allergy tests or food trials)

                Comment


                • #9
                  We lost a very good customer because of a vet (who is not a good one as we have personally experienced) anyways.
                  The other groomer had a very good client (she just always ended up doing the dog) it was a schnauzer we started grooming the puppy at 9 weeks old...When the dog was about three years old the owner came in and explained that she was not coming here anymore...Her reason? The vet said that Fluffy's ears were infected because the groomer has NEVER plucked the dogs ear before...Maybe the client misunderstood, but I know the groomer always plucked the dogs ears...It was mentioned that the dog always had very dirty greasy ears on his notes and we talked to the owner about how to clean the dogs ears...We told the women that we do pluck the dogs ears and she took the vets word over ours.It was very sad since the owner and the dog were very good.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I know it will never happen, but it sure would save alot of mistrust, or hard feelings between vets and groomers if we ALL did hand outs of what we realy said or found. My personal vet does this sometimes, I just think it would solve some of this, but I sometimes forget to give it out so I can see anyone else forgetting.
                    ~~Everyone is entitled to my opinion!~~

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My boss and 16 year owner of the grooming salon where I work was previously a vet tech for several years. She has mentioned on several occassions how she now feels a little guilty that at the vet clinic they used to quite often blame things, especially ear infections on groomers!! She now sees things on the other side of the fence, and can educate people if the vet has a tendancy to point fingers too quickly.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I do not agree with Helly at all ! I worked for a Vet and a dog I groomed the day before Thanksgiving came in sick on Sat. The Vet said right infront of me to the client that perhaps the dog was stressed from the grooming on Wednesday....not ! Turns out Sparky ate too much turkey and had pacriatitus(sp) !!!!!!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The clients also spin stories to the vets. I had one last week, went out to reception on pick up and told her the dogs ears were very red and that she should book an appointment with the vet to have them checked, so she did and saw the vet about 15 minutes later. Noticed her in the waiting room a couple of days later when she was in for a revisit for the ears, looked up her notes to see what the diagnosis was and lo and behold I see...owner says groomer told her dog has ear mites!!!!! We all had a good laugh over it, but it just goes to show you how quickly the clients can make this stuff up.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I did a 90# black Golden Doodle who was extremely dog aggressive. #7AO poodle head. Easy right? It took 2 of us working at once (thank goodness for the groomer's Helper or we could NOT have done him). He came in at 7:30AM Friday and was done by 10AM Friday.

                            Owner phoned the shop on Monday AM probably not expecting me to be there and told the owner "Your groomer put a 3 inch gash in the chest of my dog requiring 7 staples and a drain tube." The owner of the shop kept trying to make me say I was sorry & would pay for it. I did no such thing.

                            I got the # of the vet who had treated the dog. She called me back & when hearing what I had been told proceeded to tell me the owner brought in the dog to animal ER at 7PM Saturday stating that the dog was at the groomer all day and the owner claimed she did not notice the blood on his chest until she had dropped him at home, gone to do errands & returned. 33 hours had elapsed since she picked the dog up.

                            The dog owner supposedly took the dog straight to the vet & was pressuring the vet to say the groomer did it & the wound was super glued shut. The vet refused so the dog owner got irate saying the vet did not know what she was talking about since she was not a groomer. The vet said she had never groomed a dog, but, was an animal emergency specialist and this did not LOOK like anything a groomer could do, not to mention there was no super glue on the wound. We did not even have any in the shop.

                            BTW, the 3inch gash on the chest DID actually need 7 staples & a drain tube---it was 3 centimeters. The vet needed 3 people besides herself to hold the dog while they fixed up the wound. The vet reassured me that not ONLY would she not support the dog owner in her legal pursuit she was so angry at being lied to she FAXED the dog's records to it's regular groomer so they could not be tampered with. The regular groomer said the dog was usually a sedated groom. Can you say extortion?
                            "We are all ignorant--we merely have different areas of specialization."~Anonymous
                            People, PLEASE..It's ONLY a website!~Me

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sarahliz View Post
                              When my uncle sold his last litter of lab pups, one of the pups went to a family with an adult retarded son. The parents allowed the son to take the dog on a walk and he dragged the puppy to death. When the owner took the puppy to the vet they were told it was congenital and called my uncle and demanded a refund, which he gave them. My uncle then called their vet to get the details so that he could know if there was risk for his dogs or any of the other puppies. The vet told him that she had lied to "ease the pain" and admitted the truth. Now the owners have the money, no clue of the real cause, and will probably go out and get another puppy. Lets just hope the vet says something if they do or they decide to watch their son a bit more closely around the new dog.

                              Wow, this is a crazy situation. How would the vet know for a fact that the son dragged the puppy to death and that the pup didn't get hung up by it's collar or leash somehow? If he did know for a fact that it was the son's fault iit was IMO very unethical for him not only to blame it on a genetic problem, but also to not tell the owners how the puppy died so they can be more careful in educating and supervising their son w/any future dogs they may get.

                              If I was your uncle I would demand the vet reimburse HIM for the money that he refunded these people.
                              SheilaB from SC

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X