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  • Sugar scrub-questions from previous post

    First of all, THANK you all for sharing on this forum! I am just ready to open for business in my home and have been following this board for a while. No book compares to this information on this board and I thank you all!

    I love the idea of the sugar scrub. A few questions that maybe someone can answer...
    1) Since sugar (the granulated refined type) is square, is it a concern that the corners could give the skin a very small scratch-I've heard this about certain facial products for humans?

    2) What is the main difference in going with the raw over the refined type? THis may be part of #1, but thought I'd ask.

    3) I thought of offering a special on the sugar scrub for my opening. Would it be best to wait until I"ve groomed the dog at least once before offering this-that way I know the dog's skin better?

    4) While I have no plans to groom cats-I am going to groom my Mom's. Has anyone tried this for cats?

    5) Any specific breeds to completely avoid offering this too?

    6) And finally, I saw an advertisement for a human hair shampoo or product that reduces buildup around the hair follicles, allowing growth from areas that previously didn't have good growth or texture. Has anyone had an experience with an enhanced texture and thickness after using a sugar scrub for exfoliating on a dog?

    Thanks everyone, please excuse my newbee questions!

  • #2
    Great questions! Unfortunately I have no answers for you but I will be watching this thread too to see what others have to say.
    My Blog: <a href="http://groomwise.typepad.com/in_the_dogs_house/">In the Dogs' House Groomwise Blog</a>

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    • #3
      I just started using a sugar scrub on some of my clients with bad dandruff. It does seem to exfoliate well. I've never experienced a cut because of the square shape. I would be interested to see some answers on this, I don't want to hurt my babies. Raw sugar is larger in texture, I haven't used it, only the refined kind.

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      • #4
        1) Since sugar (the granulated refined type) is square, is it a concern that the corners could give the skin a very small scratch-I've heard this about certain facial products for humans?

        A: I doubt that the shape of the sugar crystals is going to damage the skin because they will dissolve when liquid is introduced. However, I use a TRUE scrub, not a liquefied version, instead. I don't add it to my shampoo, but use it PRIOR to the shampoo process and let it rest on the coat under a warm (not hot) towel. My sugar scrub is made with brown sugar, honey, and a few other ingredients, plus essential oils, so it also sort of conditions (think hot oil treatment) the skin and coat. Brown sugar is better (IMHO) because it contains molasses, which contains B vitamins that condition the hair and skin, as well as, helps to repair damage.

        2) What is the main difference in going with the raw over the refined type? THis may be part of #1, but thought I'd ask.

        A: I haven't used regular refined sugar, so I can't answer that one except to say, the raw would be something I'd consider using over the granulated if I wasn't using what I felt was already a better choice in the first place.

        3) I thought of offering a special on the sugar scrub for my opening. Would it be best to wait until I"ve groomed the dog at least once before offering this-that way I know the dog's skin better?

        A: Well, if you don't have the skills necessary to use it and explain WHY you would use it, it's probably better to wait, however, it's not something that is going to really hurt the pet in most cases. Honestly though, wouldn't you really want your NEW clients to feel confident that they are getting the best groomer that knows her stuff? What if they asked a difficult question about it that you couldn't answer? Just sayin' ... it could be a bit awkward.


        4) While I have no plans to groom cats-I am going to groom my Mom's. Has anyone tried this for cats?

        A: Never tried it for cats, so I can make no recommendations other than, if using essentials oils, it'd probably be best to NOT offer it for cats, JIC

        5) Any specific breeds to completely avoid offering this too?

        A: For dogs, not that I'm aware of unless your using essential oils, which in that case, some breeds can be sensitive to certain oils..

        6) And finally, I saw an advertisement for a human hair shampoo or product that reduces buildup around the hair follicles, allowing growth from areas that previously didn't have good growth or texture. Has anyone had an experience with an enhanced texture and thickness after using a sugar scrub for exfoliating on a dog?

        A: A true scrub will exfoliate and remove build up, but as far as claiming it would improve growth, that might be hard to substantiate, but removing build up around the follicle would AID in creating an environment that is conducive to hair REGROWTH. In regards to texture, removing build up of sebum, oils, flakes, yeast, and product residue would improve the texture and make the hair more resilient and give it more lift. So, yes, it would improve texture IMO.
        Last edited by neanea; 03-21-10, 04:20 PM.

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        • #5
          1) Since sugar (the granulated refined type) is square, is it a concern that the corners could give the skin a very small scratch-I've heard this about certain facial products for humans?

          I use refined sugar on my own face several times a week. What's great is it does exfoliate extremely well, but it dissolves rather quickly. If I can use it on my own face without any scratches or pain, I feel like it's safe to use on the dogs' bodies.


          2) What is the main difference in going with the raw over the refined type? THis may be part of #1, but thought I'd ask.

          Whatever you prefer, but in the original post, Helly explained:

          "You actually can use any type of sugar. Brown sugar and olive oil scrubs work well on dogs who have pseudofolliculitis barbi after being clipped really close. What is pseudofolliculitis barbi you might ask....think Schnauzer bumps.

          One benefit of using plain old white table sugar is that it dissolves fairly quickly. Not much chance of over exfoliating. And it's less expensive than raw sugar, which really doesn't have much benefit over table sugar when it's being used externally.

          I'm not sure there's really any benefit of raw over white sugar when it's consumed internally, either, although the processes used to refine raw sugar into white sugar may have a greater environmental impact. That brown color you find in raw sugar is molasses. Brown sugar is simply white sugar with molasses added. It's moist because it contains more molasses than raw sugar, and they don't dry it, like they do raw sugar.

          Sugar is useful in treating infection because it draws 10 times more powerfully than salt, and it doesn't sting. It has been used to field dress battle wounds for centuries because of it's ability to clot blood (remember that next time you quick a nail. Advise clients to grab the powdered sugar if it starts bleeding at home) and draw out infection. But, like I mentioned before, I wouldn't use it on a diabetic. One reason diabetics suffer from slow wound healing is the amount of glucose in their blood. Adding more sugar is just going to complicate things. "


          3) I thought of offering a special on the sugar scrub for my opening. Would it be best to wait until I"ve groomed the dog at least once before offering this-that way I know the dog's skin better?

          I've been doing them for free since I read this thread. It really makes SUCH a difference on the dogs with really flaky skin, and they seem to love the good back scratching! I was thinking of taking some pics of flaky skin after a regular shampoo, and after a shampoo with sugar scrub, maybe eventually offering it as an add on.

          4) While I have no plans to groom cats-I am going to groom my Mom's. Has anyone tried this for cats?

          Haven't tried it on a cat, but I'm curious on this one as well, since mine could use it!

          5) Any specific breeds to completely avoid offering this too?

          I don't know about specific breeds, but diabetic dogs, especially those with open sores, should not be given a sugar scrub.

          6) And finally, I saw an advertisement for a human hair shampoo or product that reduces buildup around the hair follicles, allowing growth from areas that previously didn't have good growth or texture. Has anyone had an experience with an enhanced texture and thickness after using a sugar scrub for exfoliating on a dog?

          I've only been using this for the past week or so, so I haven't had a chance to see any improvements yet. But try it for yourself and you'll see why everyone is raving about it. It really is one of the best, cheapest, and most effective tips I've found on this site!

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          • #6
            Has anyone used to scrubs on hairless breeds? I bet it would work magic on their skin...

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            • #7
              Would it help hair loss?

              I have a 7 year old LH Dachsie with a minor thyroid condition. It was misdiagnosed for 6 months before he started meds, and he lost a triangular area of fur on his head. The skin is dark and looks damaged - do you think a brown sugar scrub would help his coat? He's fine now - I'm just looking for something to make his coat look like it used to. Other commercial treatments haven't helped. Is there something else I should be putting in the brown sugar?

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              • #8
                Thank you very much! I think you're right NeaNea, I'll work with it for a while, watch the results personally, then I'll be able to offer it with confidence and more experience-Thank you!
                I do have a few dogs that are not going out with me to shows this spring or summer, so I think I'll work on them and try a few things out.

                Never thought about brown sugar-I will have to try that. Since I have my own dogs to try this out on, I'll be able to track the differences and what works best.

                Thanks again everyone!

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                • #9
                  How'd I miss this thread? Jeez! Anyhow--excellent answers here already- Nea--you are great!
                  Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt
                  www.ChrisSertzel.com

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Petekids View Post
                    I have a 7 year old LH Dachsie with a minor thyroid condition. It was misdiagnosed for 6 months before he started meds, and he lost a triangular area of fur on his head. The skin is dark and looks damaged - do you think a brown sugar scrub would help his coat? He's fine now - I'm just looking for something to make his coat look like it used to. Other commercial treatments haven't helped. Is there something else I should be putting in the brown sugar?
                    People who have Poms that are afflicted with Black Skinned Alopecia, which is similar to Acanthosis Nigricans that affects Dachshunds, have reported some success with treating these dogs with brown sugar and olive oil scrubs. I think that's probably what I'd try. It certainly wouldn't do any harm. I've used it on both of my boys when they get the summer ick, and it's been great.

                    The dark, damaged look is hyperpigmentation that can happen after the skin has been damaged from hormonal problems or surgery. Usually it will eventually return to normal. But once in a while it doesn't.

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