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When is old, too old?

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  • rainingcats&dogs
    replied
    i had someone call this week wanted an 18 yr old persian shaved,to me thats to old im not putting myself or the poor cat through that,but on the other hand my cairn is 15,no one believes it,still acts like a puppy

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  • Helly
    replied
    Pudel, I also was bitten by an old dog, a Border Collie. Just a tiny puncture on my wrist. i couldn't even get it to bleed much, so washed it as best a could, did a Betadine soak, and thought nothing more about it until the next morning.

    I woke up with my right arm throbbing, red and swollen from knuckles almost to my elbow, and headed for the ER. I had cellulitis. I had to go back to the ER that evening because the redness and swelling were advancing. Two rounds of IV antibiotics, oral antibiotics over the weekend, and saw an Ortho on Monday. I had surgery that same afternoon. I almost lost my arm because a piece of tartar had broken off from the dog's tooth and was lodged in my flesh.

    Which brings me to this; if you have a bite, no matter how insignificant it may seem, don't take it lightly until you're sure it's healing without any problems. Any redness, swelling, stiffness, or bad odor needs to be evaluated by a doctor.

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  • brownlikewoah
    replied
    I would also like to add, when they do "the bark" the entire groom... then you know they've had enough.

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  • pudel
    replied
    Originally posted by Helly View Post
    Perhaps you could say "Sure, if you'd be willing to support me while I recover from the bite I get that IS bad. Of course, if it's bad enough, I might never be able to groom again, so you should consider exactly how long you'd have to support me."
    Helly I got a bite from an ancient dog once. It got me right on the knuckle. The infection was so bad that they were afraid it would go into the bone. Thankfully it did not do that. But my hand looked like I had a really bad case of arthritis for a very long time. Since then, I have my limits with grooming very old dogs. I am too old to start another career. And If I get bit again and it debillitates me, then yes, someone is going to pay me for the rest of my life.

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  • Helly
    replied
    Originally posted by scrubapup View Post
    The owner apologized, while acting very surprised, and then asked me if I would be willing to groom her again since she "really didn't get me bad". **sigh**

    Some people just don't get it.
    Perhaps you could say "Sure, if you'd be willing to support me while I recover from the bite I get that IS bad. Of course, if it's bad enough, I might never be able to groom again, so you should consider exactly how long you'd have to support me."

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  • gottalovegracie
    replied
    Wow, I appreciate all your help. The mom just kept saying that Easter was coming and he needed to look good. I told her he just can't handle it anymore...can't even keep his balance. I thought he looked pretty good without the cut, actually. His hair is so thin that when she has him cut short, he's see thru. She said, "this will do for now, but he will get too hot come summer with all this hair (mind you his hair was maybe an inch??) I told her with it being so thin, he would do better with a little more hair.

    I had the lady's daughter help hold his face that first time since they wanted it shaved...i didn't get bit but she sure did(no blood), a few times. That's just not right.

    Helly, if I get the chance to see him again, I will definately look for some of those signs you listed. That is very helpful. I told her she might need him groomed at a vets office (sorry vet groomers ...just in case something would happen, they would be better prepared to handle those situations. I'm not and I really don't want him crashing on my table. I only mentioned MY dangers when she wasn't hearing any of the other things I was trying to get thru to her. Anyways, thanks y'all!

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  • SiberianLover
    replied
    I had one 16 yr old yorkie, all skin and bones, that I made the owner get a note from the vet before I would touch it. The dog passed away about 2 weeks later.

    Another elderly poodle that I had groomed at my new shop for a while was getting to where she couldn't take it anymore. Her last groom I had her dads stay with her the whole time. They saw how she reacted to the grooming and they ended up agreeing that enough was enough.

    Another 16 yr old Westie came in because they didn't like how the other groomer did it. The dog was stressing out, biting and teeter tottering all over the place. I got bit, and had to try to scissor the face with a muzzle on.

    The owner called back and wanted me to take the face shorter. I said no. I told her I would not do the dog again and it was in the dogs best interest to be groomed by a vet groomer so they would be right there should the dog stress out too much.

    My short answer is when the potential for danger to either the dog or the groomer is too high, the dog should refused. You can't groom everything.

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  • mylady
    replied
    I specialize in senior and special needs pets. I have never had anyone question me about what i felt was safe or right for their pet, thankfully. All have understood that I am thinking about their pets's best interest. It would drive me insane to have a client like that, insist on something that simply was too much for their poor pet to handle. I have had poodles over the years, that although were still able to be groomed, clean feet were getting to be too much so I would suggest teddy bear feet to the owners and tell them why. None ever had a problem and a few thanked me for being concerned enough to tell them. I don't understand people who put a haircut over the comfort of their pet. Whether it's age, or "it has to be dematted" kind of thing. Thankfully the only senior dog I do that's a biter is a Chihuahua, so that's pretty easy. Not that he has many teeth left.
    Every dog I take on an individual basis. i started grooming one Westie at 15 that would still do backflips (literally) for her mom, dance on her hind legs and twirl. She lived to be over 20 before I lost her as a client. My Toy poodle was great right up to the end for the most part. She was 19 and my little girl had a stroke. But up until then she still got around very well, could see and hear. S he was slower and had some arthritis, but even the vets told me they felt she was in very minimal discomfort and probably only after a long rest she might be stiff. They were shocked at how wonderfully she aged.
    You need to know what your, and each pets, limits are. Never feel bad for sticking up for yourself, especially when it's to try to make a pets like more comfortable.

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  • Moonpiepoodlz
    replied
    I just told a client I would no longer groom their schnauzer as it was no longer safe for either one of us. the dog was totally stressed during the grooming; screaming, barking, falling, just unable to deal with the whole grooming process.
    Fortunately mom and dad were more worried about the comfort of the dog than the way he looked.

    I think deciding when old is too old, depends on each dog.

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  • Helly
    replied
    You can't really pinpoint a specific age. A 12 year old Standard Poodle is a lot older than a 12 year old Chihuahua. So you have to really look at the individual dog and decide, based on his physical presentation, if he's "too old" to be groomed safely.

    I'd start by just looking at him. Does he have muscle wasting? Can he stand unassisted. Is he shaking? When you handle his ears, are they cold to the touch? Is his belly distended?

    Then I'd look a little deeper. Check for dehydration. Check his gums. Does his breath smell like urine, or rotten fruit? Does his breath smell like rotten teeth? Listen for wheezing or coughs. Does he react painfully when you manipulate his legs or neck.

    If you're seeing signs that point to problems, you should probably ask the owner to have their vet check the dog and give you a written statement that it's okay to groom him. I'd also make that SOP for any dog that can be considered geriatric.

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  • Smart-n-Pretty
    replied
    Originally posted by Doubledogdare View Post
    With dogs that are in "God's Waiting Room", if they are having trouble dealling with a full groom, we will break it down into sessions over the course of a week so the dog doesn't get all stressed out at one sitting.

    One day we do any prep work that needs doing, one day for a bath, third day a haircut or trim.

    Might be a bit of a scramble on the owner's part, but it is easier on the dog.
    That is not really practical in a mobile unit.

    Leave a comment:


  • winterroo
    replied
    I had that dog of my own...his last haircut was a half inch all over-head to tail-with a clean face-I was barely able to do his legs even, I just ended up scissoring them up the best I could because I couldn't really clip them. Ugly? You bet...but a pretty haircut just didn't work for either one of us at that point. Now I can tell people that-yes, I did the same thing with my old dog-and leave it at that. How can you argue? I get really frustrated with those who think their dog NEEDS to be fashionable when it is no longer possible to do so-both for their safety and ours.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doubledogdare
    replied
    With dogs that are in "God's Waiting Room", if they are having trouble dealling with a full groom, we will break it down into sessions over the course of a week so the dog doesn't get all stressed out at one sitting.

    One day we do any prep work that needs doing, one day for a bath, third day a haircut or trim.

    Might be a bit of a scramble on the owner's part, but it is easier on the dog.

    Leave a comment:


  • scrubapup
    replied
    Originally posted by Nadu View Post
    When it is unsafe for you and/or the dog, and from what you say, it is time.
    Ditto!!

    I recently told a client who has been coming to me for 7 years that I could no longer groom her 18 year old Peke. Fortunately for me, the owner completely understood and said she had just been telling her husband that having me groom him was unfair to ME. This particular dog has a heart condition, and on top of the fact that the once wonderful dog has become irritable, I was afraid he was going to keel over on me right after he sunk his old teeth into me.

    Sometimes we feel defeated when we can't do the job, but I would rather temporarily feel defeated, then to live with the guilt when a dog dies on my table, regardless of whether or not the dog is older then dirt or has a health issue. I wouldn't feel to bad about that woman getting upset with you. If she gets that upset over you refusing to groom her dog, imagine how she will act if something happens to the dog while in your care. It will be YOUR fault.

    As for bites - I've been dwelling over THAT situation since Monday. I had a Schnoodle at my shop Monday who wigged out and nailed me on my finger. Not a "bad" bite, but it did draw blood. I put the dog in a cage to let her chill out and tend to myself, and then attempted to finish her.... because I'm stubborn like that. Got the dog out of the cage (after putting her muzzle on) put her on my table and started hooking her up to my GH. She started wigging out again, got her muzzle off and nailed me AGAIN. This time putting a tooth into my fingernail on the same finger she had already munched on. That was it for me, and I called the owner. The owner apologized, while acting very surprised, and then asked me if I would be willing to groom her again since she "really didn't get me bad". **sigh**

    Some people just don't get it.

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  • neanea
    replied
    I have a few that won't be "with us" much longer and for them, I do what the dog will allow safely (their safety). Of course, these dogs don't try to bite me and that's a whole different situation. A dog that is trying to bite and flipping out for the grooming process is subject to passing on your table and I would probably ask the client to accept what's good enough and let that be it. If they weren't understanding about the dog's situation and the place they are putting YOU in, then I would no longer book them.

    I'm so glad I have very understanding clients that LOVE their pets and want only what's best for them

    Leave a comment:

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