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Before Im ready

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  • Before Im ready

    *sigh*
    well my friend and our groomer at work is leaving our shop-its an hour drive from her house and she isnt doing enough dogs for a full time position.we lost a lot of business while we didnt have a groomer after our other one was fired(cut dogs and didnt tell anyone) now me wanting to be a groomer and taking some online courses and a dog here and there for practice agreed to be the new groomer without a thought,but now im freaking out.I want this pretty bad But now Im starting to feel like im not ready -there is no way I could have turned this down.
    what should I do?IM nervous.she is leaving in 2 weeks and will help me till she leaves but after that im on my own.**** I need a crash course.

  • #2
    I would freak out too...I would also reconsider. JMHO

    i think you need MUCH more time then 2 weeks. Once you start losing clients due to lack of experience it will be very hard to get them back.

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    • #3
      Hmm, where are you?
      How much experience do you have so far? How busy is the shop? How are people reacting the dogs you've groomed so far? There are many clients out there who are more concerned with proper treatment of their dog than the perfect haircut. What kind of clientele does your shop cater to? Is it mostly shave downs? Hand scissors? There are a lot of variables. I know it can be really scary. I walked into work one day as a bather and all the groomers had quit but one (3 out of 4). I was handed a pair of clippers and that was the start of my "training". I had been a bather for about 6 months, had watched A LOT and learn very well by observation. Within a few months I was grooming on my own, then that groomer quit, we had a few new groomers, including myself, and within another year and a half I was running the place. Did REALLY well at it to if I do say so myself. We were last in a company of 36 stores and in 6 months I had our salon in first place in sales, with a profit margin never beloew 31% and we stayed there for about 9 months straight, and the 3 years I was running it we never fell below third place. Also had the lowest average price of groom. This sounds like a sink or swim kind of situation and it's up to you whether or not you think you're ready to dive in without a life preserver! Good luck with whatever you choose to do. You're probably half way cross the world from me, but if you happen to be close by, I'd help any way I could.
      What a caterpillar considers the end of his world, we call a butterfly.

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      • #4
        I hate to say it but you'll need some help. Where are you located? Maybe there's someone in the area that would be willing to give you some crash course training.

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        • #5
          I'm in Southern CA, I wouldn't mind training a bit!
          There are 3 different kinds of people in this world: Dog people, cat people, and rational people who don't have a problem liking two things at the same time.

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          • #6
            I would be nervous too, but you have to start somewhere. If you can master the most basic trims in two weeks the rest will come. Most customers are going to want one hair length all over. They are going to want column legs and well rounded feet. The most common head styles you will use the most are what I call the Panda, Teddy Bear, Westie, Schauzer. You need to groom a poodle. If you can do poodles you can do just about anything. I'm sure there is more than this, but this will get you started and don't be afraid to ask questions. I'm still asking and learning even after leaving school.

            I guess what I'm trying to say is you need to be calm and be confident in your abilities and don't get frazzled. Dogs will pick up on your energy and if you are new and confidence is low it will be rough going. I had a girl next to me in grooming school that had low esteme and some days she would break down in tears. i would jump in and give her a hand and help her build herself up. By the end of schooling she had gotten her confidence and could handle just about any situation. I even had her put her dog back in its crate and take a break to get herself back in the right frame of mind. Thats one thing about being mobile; its just you and the dog and you have to do the groom even when the dog is being a PITA.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by k2p1e View Post
              I would freak out too...I would also reconsider. JMHO

              i think you need MUCH more time then 2 weeks. Once you start losing clients due to lack of experience it will be very hard to get them back.
              As sad as it is I have to agree here if you were trying to start out with someone to help you along it would not be a question ,However you will be on your own and will not have anyone to help you out in the mostly unknown..

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              • #8
                If you know the basics, and you don't take anything that is too hard (like a wheatie in breed clip or a poodle in continental) you will be fine. MANY MANY groomers started out with less training than you have and went far. Ask Dawn Omboy. I also had a similar experience. I knew I wasn't ready to be a full fledged groomer when I started my first "real" job as a groomer and needed more handson and pattern work. the groomer QUIT right after I was hired and I had no choice but to step up. It worked out for me!
                <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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