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ok, I tried bath befor clipping a matted dog today..

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  • ok, I tried bath befor clipping a matted dog today..

    I had a new customer today. She brought in a matted Poodle that would have been a # 5 at least. I put the dog straight in the tub. I bathed as well as I could and used cream rinse. Used the stuff all over it befor HVing it out. It seemed to be going pretty good at first, but then the dog started bucking and biting when I moved the hv off the hind quarters toward the center of the body. I turned HV down enough so the dog would relax, but then it was not blowing out the matts very well anymore...ugh. It got worse when I triied to do the front legs.
    Ok now, I have a wet, matted dog on my table that I can't dry with out it thrashing around giving itself a neck injury. It was harnessed at hip and throat with as well as up above, to control its movements.
    I managed to get it dry enough to start damp clipping where I could. that came off nice with the 4 blade, but I still in the end had to fight with the front legs and I got a rough 5 through them. By that time, the rest of the body was dry but curly.. :{ I wondered if I should rewet and try to blow dry... no.. not enough time...

    Um... I hated my first try at this method.
    If I had preped the dog as I usually do, I would have discovered its attitude when I first tried to pluck its ears, do nails. I would have most likely called the owner to pick it up , Or bring a proper fitting muzzle, because of its aggression, but by the time I figured out the terror it was, It was wet and matted and I felt I had to get through it. For most of the groom I felt completely overwhelmed with the wet, matted hair combined with the dogs unco-operation.
    In the end, I only save myself 1 blade lenght on the body and the back legs. the front legs I needed to mostly scissor to 4 length. the dog calmed down some and I managed to make it look nice.
    The owner was very happy. I did fill her in the dogs temperment on the table and she promised to bring him back in 2 months with a proper fitting muzzle and I agreed to work with him to get him to relax. She was new to town and only had him groomed once befor and was not aware he was a biter. Hmmm yeah I don't buy it.
    I guess these people figure that being bitten is part of the job!
    I am not knocking something that works for you guys,
    maybe I missed something, but it didn't go well and I won't be pre bathing matted shave downs again any time soon. It didn't seem to make grooming the dog any easier for me.
    I was really wishing I had one of you in my shop today to show me how to do it. :\ I am sure you would have had more sucess.

  • #2
    From what I've learned here. I think... You gotta clip it wet. Dont shampoo it just wet it.

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    • #3
      You could have just tried clipping the dog wet, perhaps? When I put a matted dog directly into the tub it's because I think I can save more coat if I clip wet. If a dog is pelted I will usually pre-clip, but that's the only time I do it. When I clip wet I usually just wash the dog really really well, I don't bother with conditioners or sprays, but it's my personal preference. If the dog is semi matted and they look like they'd blow out I may try the method you tried today. You could also try the HV on the dog before the tub to see how bad the matting really is, blow apart the matts a tad and see how the dog reacts to the dryer - three birds with one stone! The more you see matted coats and try different things the better you get at it, the better you're able to assess the situation to see if it's worth trying to blow out the matts. No one said you can't do ears and nails before the tub to get a feel for the dog.. if that's what works for you then do it! Every one has different ways to do things, you just gotta find yours. Good luck with your next matted pup! =)

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      • #4
        Sorry you had such a bad experience, but don't give up. You just had a bad dog. I do try to get a feel for the dog's temperment before I bathe, and I like to do ears before bath anyway. New dog, I probably would have shaved the face first to check reaction-and they don't like the dryer there anyway. Today I had a bichon for a 5AO who hasn't been in since Oct. I did rough him first only because he isn't always good for the HV. Just depends on the dog you're doing.
        Old groomers never die, they just go at a slower clip.

        Groom on!!!

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        • #5
          Just because you got a badly behaved dog doesn't mean the whole method stinks! Try it again with someone better. Lol.
          There are 3 different kinds of people in this world: Dog people, cat people, and rational people who don't have a problem liking two things at the same time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Integrity36 View Post

            I am not knocking something that works for you guys, maybe I missed something....
            You did - it is called "wet shaving" because you shave 'em down while they are WET.

            Not damp, not mostly dry - WET.

            I blow the water, soap and conditioner down under the mats, next to the skin. I HV just enough to lift the mats and stretch the coat between the mats and skin. Then, while still wet, off to the table to be shaved down.

            I think you let the dog get too dry.

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            • #7
              I'm sorry you had a bad expirance. But you shouldn't let this deter you. You haven't been grooming very long, right? I think that once you have some more expirance under your belt you'll start to find your own way of doing things. I also think that learning to handle the little naughty dogs will start to become more and more easy for you.

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              • #8
                I think it failed mostly because of the dogs behavior. I wasn't trying to 'wet shave' per se because I don't have a wet shave (circit interuper?) unit. If you pre bath, are you always wet shaving the dogs? I thought that you could blow them out, befor clipping to stretch out the coat to save some length, and still get a good result.
                The dog wasn't pelted. but was fairly matted.
                Just wondering how some of you would have approached this groom if it was a new client and didn't have a circut interupter. I am here to learn.

                Its all good. I am just chalking this up to a 'learning experience'

                I wouldn't call myself a 'new groomer' (but I am not a seasoned one either) I have been grooming for 4 years, but I have always pre cliped coats that are matted or on dogs that are not regularly groomed and have several months of hair.
                I really don't like dealing with mats after I get to the blowdrying stage and try to have them generally matt free by then and just brush out what ever tangle are left when I am fluffdrying. Usually I don't have too much trouble handling naughty dogs, but I was a little out of my groove with the new technique.

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                • #9
                  You don't always have to wet shave. Sometimes it is possible to use the HV and spiderweb the mats, forcing them away from the skin. In this case the problem really wasn't the technique, it was the dog. I don't think any technique would have made a difference here because the dog was such a PITA.

                  As for the muzzle issue; have someone teach you how to fashion a muzzle from a leash, strip of gauze, or a long piece of ribbon. That way it'll be the exact right fit, and no worries about if it's too large. And with this kind of muzzle you can still groom the face. You just have to move the thing around a bit to get to all the areas of the dog's face.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mitch73 View Post
                    From what I've learned here. I think... You gotta clip it wet. Dont shampoo it just wet it.
                    No, actually you HAVE to shampoo it otherwise you have dirty wet hair which is worse than dirty clean hair IMO. Read my handout and watch the video clip. My handout also talks about dematting wet coats.
                    <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                    • #11
                      Why wet shave??

                      OK, I know people have accomplished great things by wet shaving, but why? To make a neglected dog look better so the owner can bring it in again like that?? Not my idea of fun. However, yes, your worst problem is that you attempted it on a dog that you did not know would be difficult for ANY groom.

                      However, I really hate working with wet hair. Yuk! All I want to do with wet hair is dry it. So no, I won't be doing the wet shave thing. On top of not enjoying handling wet hair, I can shave a lot of dogs with the old skip blades and leave more coat than some would, but again, I prefer to spend my effort on well-kept dogs. Matted dogs take a lot of focus and time regardless of the shaving method. So however short they are that is the easiest for me and the dog is what the owner gets - plus a recommended schedule of grooming!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Debbiedogs View Post
                        OK, I know people have accomplished great things by wet shaving, but why? To make a neglected dog look better so the owner can bring it in again like that??
                        !
                        NO its to make my job easier. PERIOD. And to make the dog have abetter experience. I could care less what the ownners think, I do it for me and the dog,
                        <a href="http://www.groomwise.typepad.com/grooming_smarter" target="_blank">My Blog</a> The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. –Mark Twain

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                        • #13
                          So glad to hear someone say that!

                          Originally posted by Particentral View Post
                          NO its to make my job easier. PERIOD. And to make the dog have abetter experience. I could care less what the owners think, I do it for me and the dog,
                          I am getting into the grooming business because of what I can do for the dogs. I am so new that I don't give the best haircuts, but the dogs really give me the confidence to continue in this field. I had some dogs in my first month that were insanely hard, and after just a few visits they are more relaxed and calm and the owners are saying they behave well at home too. Before I guess some would hide, or pee on the floor, or have some other issues for a day or 2 after the groom. They are impressed that the dog is not doing that after seeing me, so that makes me happy. I am also happy that the owners notice the change and are looking beyond the obvious. They pay the bill so I try to please them, but the dog always comes first!
                          The dogs are truly cared for while they are with me, that includes some nice music playing and some petting and talking to them, not just rushing them through the process and making them nervous and upset. It also makes my days a whole lot better and more relaxed. After all, I had some rotten days that I thought I was useless and would never get anything right, now I don't worry so much about that, and just focus on having happy clean dogs leave my shop. Once again I am enjoying it and not as frustrated ...

                          Oh and just to update everyone, my business plan got approval yesterday! It is a good day and I look forward to making my dream work!

                          Lisa

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                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=Debbiedogs;392168]OK, I know people have accomplished great things by wet shaving, but why? To make a neglected dog look better so the owner can bring it in again like that?? Not my idea of fun. QUOTE]

                            No, that's not at all why I do it. I do it because it's easier for me and the dog. It's safer (you can see where the skin is, and avoid nicking it more easily). You can forget about clipper "burn". You don't have to dull your blades on dirty hair.

                            The fact that I can leave a little more hair is just gravy. It shows that I have talent, LOL.

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                            • #15
                              Wet shaving saves me tons of time. Dogs that would take me an hour to shave matted, I can wet shave in about 15 mins, and I don't fear I'm gonna nick them or give them clipper burn. Plus it's less wear & tear on my blades. I'm a huge beliver! I don't shave in the tub, I wrap them in a towel and take them to my table and put the towel under them to absorbe the water and catch all the wet hair. Once I'm done, they go back in the tub for a quickie, then dried. Don't give up on wet shaving, it is great, once you get used to it. My 1st attempt at a wet shave was while I was working at a petsmething. I got in so much trouble, almost got written up by the store manager,, cause that not how they did things there,,,,lmao!!!!!

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